Welcome!


This is a membership forum. As as guest, you can read most areas. If you would like to participate, please join.

[ Lost Username or Password | Pitmaster Club Information, | Join 30 Days Free | Contact Us ]

Announcement

Collapse

Meat-Up in Memphis 2020

Join us in Memphis for our Meat-Up! Space is limited to 400, secure your spot by booking early! Click here for details. (https://amazingribs.com/memphis2020)
See more
See less

How to make sourdough bread...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts
  • Willy
    Charter Member
    • Apr 2015
    • 1767
    • High Desert of the Great Southwest

    Breadhead I understand everything you are saying. What I am saying is that I am routinely making very good loaves with a very active starter that does not pass the float test when I begin to make the dough. The starter has plenty of yeast in it and the loaf produces plenty of CO2. One time it even over-proofed (my timing error) and blew up to almost a basketball size. No doubt a weaker starter will take more time than a super-active one, but so often longer ferment times are cited as a good thing, right? As an example, think of Chef Jacob's Neapolitan pizza dough that just uses one gram of yeast instead of a whole packet. I am basically equating “weaker starter” with “less yeast” and a “slower rise time”. Also, it seems to me that a starter that has “exhausted” its available food and has begun to die back in activity will be guaranteed to be as “full” of acetic and lactic acids as is possible. I’m not looking to be argumentative, just trying to satisfy my own curiosity and get comments from more experienced bakers. It’s the da**ed engineer in me!!!

    I am also curious as to what folks think about the importance of the yeast to the flavor of the final loaf. I’d love to be able to make a loaf using a starter with only bacteria, no wild yeast, then leaven it with commercial yeast. Alas, I have no way to do that.

    Comment


    • Breadhead
      Breadhead commented
      Editing a comment
      "Weaker starter = less yeast." That's a good analogy. Went you mix it in flour and water it reactivates the wild yeast though.

    • Breadhead
      Breadhead commented
      Editing a comment
      I didn't think you were being argumentive at all. I could feel your curiosity. That's what we all do on this thread is learn from each other. Ask all the questions you want.👍

    • Breadhead
      Breadhead commented
      Editing a comment
      Less yeast = more flavor. Less yeast requires more time to develop the dough which gives the flour more time to develop. Low yeast = slow rise. I call that my low and slow loaf.😎 Low and slow is as good in bread as it is in BBQ.
  • MBMorgan
    Club Member
    • Sep 2015
    • 5607
    • Colorado
    • > Weber Genesis EP-330
      > Grilla Grills Original Grilla (OG) pellet smoker
      > Pit Barrel Cooker (gone to a new home)
      > WeberQ 2000 (on "loan" to a relative)
      > Old Smokey Electric (for chickens mostly - when it's too nasty out
      to fiddle with a more capable cooker)
      > Luhr Jensen Little Chief Electric - Top Loader circa 1990 (smoked fish & jerky)
      > Thermoworks Smoke
      > 3 Thermoworks Chef Alarms
      > Thermoworks Thermapen
      > Thermoworks IR-GUN-S
      > Anova sous vide circulator
      > Searzall torch
      > BBQ Guru Rib Ring

      > Favorite Beer: Guinness Extra Stout, Fat Tire, Anchor Steam, or Alaskan Amber
      > Favorite Wine: Klinker Brick Old Ghost Zinfandel or Matetic Corralillo Winemaker's Blend
      > Favorite Whiskey: Balvenie Double Wood Scotch or Jameson Irish

    "I agree... you could use an exhausted starter for just flavor and rise the dough with active dry yeast. I've read comments on different bread sites where guys will add a pinch of dry yeast after a long preferment to speed up the process. That seems counter productive to me."

    I do it all the time. I typically bake a Forkish style bread with a 500g poolish that's allowed to develop overnight. In the poolish, I use 100g established sourdough starter (for the flavor it brings) plus another 400g flour/water. The added flour might be anywhere from 100% white to 50/50 white/whole wheat. When I assemble the loaf the next morning, I generally add 1.5g (3/8 tsp) commercial yeast (per Forkish advice) in case the loaf needs a little extra oomph for rising. Works great!
    Last edited by MBMorgan; December 5th, 2016, 01:30 PM. Reason: Corrected the amount of added commercial yeast.

    Comment


    • Breadhead
      Breadhead commented
      Editing a comment
      Many times I start my preferment with just 20 grams of starter in 500 grams flour and 500 grams of water. I let it preferment for 16 hours and the add 500 grams of new flour, 250 grams of water and 20 grams of salt. I don't bother adding any additional starter or yeast and it rises perfectly.

    • MBMorgan
      MBMorgan commented
      Editing a comment
      FWIW, I use 100 g of established starter (25g BF, 25g WW, and 50g water) for the sourdough flavor it provides. For the 500 g poolish preferment, I add only 200g BF and 200g water to the established starter ... no additional WW at all.

    • MBMorgan
      MBMorgan commented
      Editing a comment
      To answer Willy , my starter is often pretty "tired" when I mix up the poolish that will preferment overnight. Hence the commercial yeast "kicker" to the preferment as recommended by Forkish.
  • Breadhead
    Banned Former Member
    • Jul 2014
    • 1

    Originally posted by Mbmorgan View Post
    Found this on the Chefs-Resources.com site today: http://www.chefs-resources.com/kitch...cipe-template/

    With a little modification, the Baker's Recipe spreadsheet looks like it might be really useful. FYI, there's a short video explaining the spreadsheet on the same page.

    EDIT: I've been checking the spreadsheet and have found that some of the oz.-to-gram conversions are off ... so until I've made corrections, use them with a grain of salt (by weight, of course) ...
    This format is what professional baker's use as their guide. It shows the traditional formula for each type of bread. Notice their is no yeast column showing how much or what type of yeast to use. Professional bakers know yeast is only used to determine when you want to bake your dough. They use very little yeast or starter for premium Artisan loaves and lots of yeast, starter, for sameday average bread. They use the bakers percentage to calculate their formula for how much bread they want to make. They can make 1 loaf or 1000 loaves using this list. They know they can tweak the hydration rate, the salt content, they can add or subtract fat at will.
    Attached Files

    Comment


    • Willy
      Willy commented
      Editing a comment
      Nice chart--Thanks!
  • Breadhead
    Banned Former Member
    • Jul 2014
    • 1

    Willy said...

    Breadhead I would never want to contaminate my starter with commercial yeast, but it'd be fun to make a sourdough loaf with no wild yeast. I just don't know how to do that. Maybe a young starter that has never floated, but I'd worry the bacteria wouldn't be up to the job, either.

    hmmm... a young starter that had never floated, I'm thinking that would not rise your dough and probably not bring much flavor either because the bacteria hasn't fully developed either.

    I would do what Mbmorgan said... use an exhausted starter in a preferment and add a pinch of dry yeast. The problem will be that the exhausted starter will reactivate soon after you put it in fresh flour and water so your desire to make sourdough bread with no wild yeast is not possible that way.

    ken Forkish has some recipes that are just yeast bread though.

    Comment


    • Willy
      Willy commented
      Editing a comment
      Yeah, getting active bacterial colonies without wild yeast is the problem. The rise wouldn't be a problem as it would be provided by commercial yeast. My curiosity is to find out if wild yeast brings any real flavor to the party beyond what commercial yeast brings.

    • Breadhead
      Breadhead commented
      Editing a comment
      Yeast is yeast... it doesn't matter which you use. Wild yeast in a sourdough starter does exactly what dry yeast does. What's different is the culture in your starter. As we discussed before the unique flavor you get from a sourdough starter is from the bacteria it produces.
  • Potkettleblack
    Club Member
    • Jun 2016
    • 1790
    • Chicago, IL
    • Grill: Grilla Original / Weber Genesis EP-330
      Thermometers: Thermapen / iGrill 2 / Fireboard
      For Smoke: Chunks / Pellet Tube / Mo Pouch
      Sous Vide: Joule / Nomiku WiFi
      Disqus: Le Chef - (something something something)

    Originally posted by Breadhead View Post
    Willy said...

    Breadhead I would never want to contaminate my starter with commercial yeast, but it'd be fun to make a sourdough loaf with no wild yeast. I just don't know how to do that. Maybe a young starter that has never floated, but I'd worry the bacteria wouldn't be up to the job, either.

    hmmm... a young starter that had never floated, I'm thinking that would not rise your dough and probably not bring much flavor either because the bacteria hasn't fully developed either.

    I would do what Mbmorgan said... use an exhausted starter in a preferment and add a pinch of dry yeast. The problem will be that the exhausted starter will reactivate soon after you put it in fresh flour and water so your desire to make sourdough bread with no wild yeast is not possible that way.

    ken Forkish has some recipes that are just yeast bread though.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	14212767_10209704425957677_7106292970881031476_n.jpg
Views:	16
Size:	114.8 KB
ID:	247168Click image for larger version

Name:	14212802_10209704426797698_9150104149230808467_n.jpg
Views:	15
Size:	74.5 KB
ID:	247167

    This is a Forkish bread made with a "straight" dough using nothing but commercial yeast. While a great bread, with an overnight bulk ferment, it's flavor was not what the levain bread with a bit of commercial yeast made this thanksgiving.

    Comment


    • Breadhead
      Breadhead commented
      Editing a comment
      Oh my... that's a beautiful loaf of bread!!! Fantastic crumb.👌 Forkish explains in his book the added complexity of levain bread adds lots of flavor. As does the preferment of regular yeasted bread. Giving flour lots of time to develop makes your bread taste better.

    • Breadhead
      Breadhead commented
      Editing a comment
      Personally I've never found a need to add yeast after the preferment. The pinch of yeast used in the preferment for 16 hours has multiplied many times in that 16 hour period. I just add the rest of the flour, water and salt and my final mix rises just fine.
  • RonB
    Club Member
    • Apr 2016
    • 10787
    • Near Richmond VA
    • Weber Performer Deluxe
      SNS
      Pizza insert
      Rotisserie
      Smokenator 1000
      Cookshack Smokette Elite
      2 Thermapens
      Chefalarm
      Dot
      lots of probes.
      CyberQ

    That's one great looking boule Potkettleblack . The crust has a great color, and the crumb is top notch. I might have to check the Forkish guy out.

    Comment


    • Breadhead
      Breadhead commented
      Editing a comment
      You really should study Ken Forkish' ideas and techniques. If you want to make really high hydration dough he is the master of that realm in my opinion.
  • Willy
    Charter Member
    • Apr 2015
    • 1767
    • High Desert of the Great Southwest

    Breadhead The reason I wonder about the influence of the yeast on the flavor of bread is based on my experience as a homebrewer some 20 years ago (I gave it up because it’s too much work and because excellent beer is easily bought, unlike excellent BBQ and bread which must be homemade). Consider a good German hefeweizen (a wheat beer) like Paulaner which has a taste often described as clovey/banana-y. Then taste almost any American wheat beer—they do not have that unique taste like Paulaner. The difference is due to a special strain of yeast used to make hefeweizens. That yeast produces esters that give the beer its lovely flavor.

    So, I am curious about whatever taste the wild yeast might impart to our sourdough. While I suspect it is minimal, I simply don’t know for sure.

    Comment

    • Willy
      Charter Member
      • Apr 2015
      • 1767
      • High Desert of the Great Southwest

      Breadhead What do you see as the advantage to using a tiny amount of starter (your 20 grams, say) and (I'm assuming) letting it rise at room temp vs using a larger amount of starter, say, 200 grams, and letting it stew in the fridge overnight or longer?

      Comment

      • Breadhead
        Banned Former Member
        • Jul 2014
        • 1

        Originally posted by Willy View Post
        Breadhead What do you see as the advantage to using a tiny amount of starter (your 20 grams, say) and (I'm assuming) letting it rise at room temp vs using a larger amount of starter, say, 200 grams, and letting it stew in the fridge overnight or longer?
        Less yeast = better flavor. Slower fermentation = better flavor. Low and slow is as good for bread as it is for BBQ.👌
        Like BBQ... going low and slow with bread is all waiting time, no labor required. Patience grasshopper.👍 Planning ahead has great benefits.

        Subtle Flavor and Aroma Differences
        Prefermented dough, poolish, sponge and biga are the primary types of commercial yeast raised preferments available to bakers. It is possible for bakers to develop a unique preferment (between an sponge and a poolish, for example), but the concept stays the same.
        The use of preferments is a simple and inexpensive way to improve bread quality. Each preferment generates different aromas depending on its characteristics. Aromas and final bread flavors are influenced by the preferments' liquid or stiff consistency, fermentation temperature, salt including or exclusion and the use of commercial yeast or wild yeast.
        Although it is difficult to describe all the flavors of each preferment, the poolish is generally described as having a nutty flavor, the sponge is sweeter with more acidity, and the prefermented dough is a little bit more acetic without being sour.
        The main factors to take into consideration when opting for a specific type of preferment are production and space requirements, flour characteristics and flavor. Knowing all those parameters, you should be able to decide what kind of preferment is best for your production. Once the choice is made, it is better to limit the type of preferment to two or three kinds.
        Using preferments is one more example of how the baking process can be simple and complex at the same time. But, when you understand how to work with preferments, they can provide a natural and traditional technique to improve bread quality.
        Last edited by Breadhead; December 5th, 2016, 09:28 PM.

        Comment

        • Breadhead
          Banned Former Member
          • Jul 2014
          • 1

          Willy said...

          "So, I am curious about whatever taste the wild yeast might impart to our sourdough. While I suspect it is minimal, I simply don’t know for sure."

          Know this... sourdough bread has 4 ingredients, flour, water, salt and your starter. You starter is flour and water, so your are really dealing with flour, water and salt. You... didn't add wild yeast to your starter, your processed flour contains some yeast and then the wild yeast on your hands in your kitchen invaded the flour and water you mixed together. Wild yeast is everywhere. Your local wild yeast invaded your flour and water and killed the yeast in your flour and took over the infrastructure of your starter. The wild yeast creates 2 forms of bacteria, acidic acid and lactic acid. They produce alcohol and Co2 gas, the gas raises your dough. The bacteria flavors your dough/bread.

          A starter is a living organism that can be manipulated/engineered to be what you want it to be. If you engineer it to have the lactic acid the dominate bacteria of the culture you will get a mild loaf of bread, very little sourdough tang. If you engineer it to have the acidic acid dominate the culture you will get a tangy sour loaf - like San Francisco style sourdough bread. Advanced Artisan bread makers keep both types of starters.

          So... now that we've established that what we are using to make sourdough bread is flour, water and salt... that has been invaded by wild yeast how do we make a real kick ass loaf of bread that will blow your mind/taste buds?😎

          What really improves the taste and quality of an Artisan loaf of sourdough bread that you can't buy anywhere? What is your number 1 flavor builder? The answer to those questions is... TIME.

          FLOUR... is your main ingredient. If you give flour lots and lots of time to absorb the water you feed it, it starts a chemical reaction that develops enzymes that helps the bacteria do its job, it builds the Co2 necessary to raise the dough, the alcohol adds to the flavor. So... at the end of the day, TIME is your major flavor builder.

          You can mix together the exact same ingredients and make a loaf of sourdough bread in 6 hours and you will get a mild loaf of bread, no matter what your starter was engineered to do. Use the same ingredients and give it 12 hours, 18 hours, 26 hours, 32 hours to fully develop and each loaf will be noticeably different. Time... builds flavor.👍
          Last edited by Breadhead; December 5th, 2016, 10:51 PM.

          Comment


          • scottranda
            scottranda commented
            Editing a comment
            Noticeably different flavor. I only do long preferments now bc it's way better, and doesn't take any more effort. Just more time/planning. I got one going right now!

          • Willy
            Willy commented
            Editing a comment
            A quick point of clarification--the yeast doesn't create the bacteria; the bacteria are separate wild species just like yeast and they get into the starter from the air, our hands, etc., just as does the yeast.
        • Breadhead
          Banned Former Member
          • Jul 2014
          • 1

          Willy ... when to add salt.


          The reason for the autolyse is to give the flour time to absorb the water... plus it gives it a head start on gluten development. Salt is usually held back because it inhibits the gluten development some. I weigh my salt content for the recipe during the mixing process but I put it in a ramican and set it right next to the mixing bowl that my dough is autolysing in. That's my safeguard from forgeting to add the salt.

          Chef Jacob waits until he starts the slap and folds to add the salt. I usually follow his lead on that.

          Last edited by Breadhead; December 6th, 2016, 01:55 PM.

          Comment


          • Willy
            Willy commented
            Editing a comment
            I don't mix the salt in--I just dump it on top when the mixing of the dough is finished. It gets mixed when the dough is kneaded or S&F'd. Lately, I am kneading with a KitchenAid & dough hook.

          • Breadhead
            Breadhead commented
            Editing a comment
            You're good... I just don't worry about not remembering the salt. My brain requires a built in check list that must be followed. In 5 years I forgot the salt once.😎
        • scottranda
          Charter Member
          • May 2015
          • 1448
          • Charlotte, NC

          I've heard several times that sourdough bread will "keep" longer. Will it "keep" longer/shorter if I used more sourdough starter (without a pre-ferment)? And will it keep more/less time if I use a pre-ferment?

          So, what makes sourdough keep longer?

          Comment


          • Willy
            Willy commented
            Editing a comment
            My understanding is that its acidity helps with preservation.
        • Potkettleblack
          Club Member
          • Jun 2016
          • 1790
          • Chicago, IL
          • Grill: Grilla Original / Weber Genesis EP-330
            Thermometers: Thermapen / iGrill 2 / Fireboard
            For Smoke: Chunks / Pellet Tube / Mo Pouch
            Sous Vide: Joule / Nomiku WiFi
            Disqus: Le Chef - (something something something)

          Okay, if we're asking random questions: What, if any, is the advantage of a high hydration dough. The difficulty in use is an obvious downside, but what are we trading for?

          Comment


          • Breadhead
            Breadhead commented
            Editing a comment
            You get a more open and softer crumb. It is well worth going up in hydration. Use Ken Forkish' technique. He really makes mixing high hydration dough very simple. Google Ken Forkish on YouTube. His videos are excellent. It's easier than the slap and folds actually.

          • Potkettleblack
            Potkettleblack commented
            Editing a comment
            Forkish is actually the only way I know to do things. My brother buying me that book is what started my interest in bread.

          • Breadhead
            Breadhead commented
            Editing a comment
            You have probably been making high hydration dough following Forkish. Try making a 65% hydration loaf just so you see the difference in the crumb.
        • Breadhead
          Banned Former Member
          • Jul 2014
          • 1

          Originally posted by scottranda View Post
          I've heard several times that sourdough bread will "keep" longer. Will it "keep" longer/shorter if I used more sourdough starter (without a pre-ferment)? And will it keep more/less time if I use a pre-ferment?

          So, what makes sourdough keep longer?
          Specifically, the fermentation process produces "lactic acid", and this element is responsible for the natural keeping qualities of sourdough bread. What a relief to use this acidity to our advantage instead of relying on commercial bread's "shelf life extender" and "mould inhibitor".

          A preferment of 20 grams of starter, 500 grams of water and 500 grams of flour will have as much starter after a 16 hour fermentation as a same day dough that contains 200 grams of starter.

          That 20 grams will multiply many, many times during those 16 hours. Putting it in the 500g of flour is starter nirvana. The ultimate feeding.🙀
          Last edited by Breadhead; December 6th, 2016, 03:42 PM.

          Comment


          • scottranda
            scottranda commented
            Editing a comment
            Your last 2 paragraphs was what I thought. Thx for confirming that, plus the education earlier!
        • Breadhead
          Banned Former Member
          • Jul 2014
          • 1

          Willy commented
          December 6th, 2016, 04:43 PM
          A quick point of clarification--the yeast doesn't create the bacteria; the bacteria are separate wild species just like yeast and they get into the starter from the air, our hands, etc., just as does the yeast.

          The wild yeast that invades your starter has no bacteria in it. The bacteria doesn't invade your starter like the yeast does. The flour and water that you mix together has all of the necessary chemicals to start the process once the wild yeast ignites the process. You flour contains natural sugar. The lactic acid bacteria in the flour consumes the sugar and its digestive content creates alcohol and Co2.

          If you really want to totally understand the science to this entire process... here is the best article I've ever found on the subject. http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/103...tion-sourdough

          Comment


          • Willy
            Willy commented
            Editing a comment
            Agreed yeast has no bacteria. Disagree that bacteria doesn't "invade"; it invades from the environment and the flour. I've read Wink's article several times.

            The reason that a new starter gets sour before it's able to leaven is due to the bacteria. The yeast takes longer to get established.

          • Breadhead
            Breadhead commented
            Editing a comment
            You might be correct... lactic acid bacteria is everywhere like wild yeast is. I'll have to reread the Wink article. My understanding is that the Wheat in the field has lactic acid on it plus it has natural sugar too. When it's processed those elements remain in the processed flour.

        Announcement

        Collapse

        Meat-Up in Memphis 2020

        Join us in Memphis for our Meat-Up! Space is limited to 400, secure your spot by booking early! Click here for details. (https://amazingribs.com/memphis2020)
        See more
        See less
        Working...
        X
        Meat-Up in Memphis

        T-Shirts & More T-Shirts & More
        Order men's and women's T-Shirts, Sweatshirts, Aprons, Mugs, Caps, Tote Bags, Flasks, and more, all imprinted with the Pitmaster Club logo. There's even a spiral bound journal where you can make notes on your cooks.

        Cool Embroidered Shirt Cool Embroidered Shirt
        This beautifully embroidered shirt is the same one Meathead wears in public and on TV. It's wash and wear and doesn't need ironing (really!), but it is a soft cottonlike feel. Choice of four colors and both men's and women's.

        Click here for more info.

        Support ARC

        Many merchants pay us a small referral fee when you click our links and purchase from them. On Amazon it works on everything from grills to diapers, they never tell us what you bought, and it has zero impact on the price you pay, but has a major impact on our ability to improve this site! And remember, we only recommend products we love. If you like AmazingRibs.com, please save this link and use it every time you go to Amazon.

        https://tinyurl.com/amazingribs

        BBQ Stars

        SPOTLIGHT

        These are not ads or paid placements. These Are Some Of Our Favorite Tools And Toys.

        These are products we have tested, won our top awards, and are highly recommend. Click here to read how we test, about our medals, and what they mean.

        Use our links when you buy things

        Many merchants pay us a small referral fee when you click our links and purchase from them. On Amazon it works on everything from grills to diapers, they never tell us what you bought, it has zero impact on the price you pay, but has a major impact on our ability to improve this site! If you like AmazingRibs.com, please save this link and use it every time you go to Amazon

        https://tinyurl.com/amazingribs

         


        Placeholder

        Surely you know somebody who loves outdoor cooking who deserves a gift for the holidays, birthday, anniversary, or just for being wonderful. There he is, right in the mirror! Here are our selections of best ideas, all Platinum or Gold Medalists, listed by price.

        Click here to see our list of Gold Medal Gifts


        Digital Thermometers Are Your Most Valuable Tool And Here's A Great Buy!

        maverick PT55 thermometer

        A good digital thermometer keeps you from serving dry overcooked food or dangerously undercooked food. They are much faster and much more accurate than dial thermometers. YOU NEED ONE!

        Click here for more info on the Maverick PT-55 Waterproof Instant-Read Thermometer Review shown above. It may be the best value in a thermometer out there


        If you have a Weber Kettle, you need the Slow 'N' Sear

        slow n sear

        The Slow 'N' Sear turns your grill into a first class smoker and also creates an extremely hot sear zone you can use to create steakhouse steaks.

        Click here for our article on this breakthrough tool


        Bring The Heat With Broil King Signet's Dual Tube Burners

        the good one grill

        The Broil King Signet 320 is a modestly priced, 3-burner gas grill that packs a lot of value and power under the hood. Broil King's proprietary, dual-tube burners get hot fast and are able to achieve high, searing temps that rival most comparatively priced gas grills. The quality cast aluminum housing carries a Limited Lifetime Warranty.

        Click here to read our complete review


        The Good-One Is A Superb Grill And A Superb Smoker All In One

        the good one grill

        The Good-One Open Range is a charcoal grill with an offset smoke chamber attached. It is dramatically different from a traditional offset smoker. The grill sits low in front and doubles as a firebox for the smoke chamber which is spliced on above and behind so it can work like a horizontal offset smoker only better. By placing the heat source behind and under the smokebox instead of off to the side, Open Range produces even temperature from left to right, something almost impossible to achieve with a standard barrel shaped offset.

        Click here to read our complete review


        Pit Barrel Cooker Smoker

        Griddle And Deep Fryer All In One

        The flat top does the burgers and the fryer does the fries. Use the griddle for bacon, eggs, and home fries. Or pancakes, fajitas, grilled cheese, you name it. Why stink up the house deep frying and spatter all over? Do your fried chicken and calamari outside. Blackstone's Rangetop Combo With Deep Fryer does it all. Plus it has a built in cutting board, garbage bag holder, and paper towel holder. An additional work table on the left side provides plenty of counter space.

        Click here to read our detailed review and to order


        Pit Barrel Cooker Smoker

        The Pit Barrel Cooker May Be Too Easy

        The PBC has a rabid cult following for good reason. It is absolutely positively without a doubt the best bargain on a smoker in the world. Period. This baby will cook circles around the cheap offset sideways barrel smokers in the hardware stores because temperature control is so much easier. Best of all, it is only $299 delivered to your door!

        Click here to read our detailed review and the raves from people who own them


        Compact Powerful Sear Machine For Your Next Tailgater

        Placeholder

        Char-Broil's Grill2Go x200 is a super-portable, fun little sizzler made of heavy, rust-proof cast aluminum. The lid snaps shut. Grab the handle and you're off to the party! Char-Broil's TRU-Infrared design produces searing heat while reducing fuel consumption. A 16 ounce LP gas canister is enough to keep you flipping burgers for hours.

        Click here to read our detailed review and to order


        The Cool Kettle With The Hinged Hood We Always Wanted

        NK-22-Ck Grill

        Their NK22CK-C Charcoal Kettle Grill puts a few spins on the familiar kettle design. In fact, the hinged lid with a handle on the front, spins in a rotary motion 180 degrees. It's hard to beat a Weber kettle, but Napoleon holds its own and adds some unique features to make the NK22CK-C a viable alternative.

        Click here for more about what makes this grill special


        Placeholder

        G&F Suede Welder's Gloves

        Heat Resistant Gloves With Extra Long Sleeves Hold The Hot Stuff

        If you're using oven mitts at the grill, it's time to trade up. Say hello to these suede welder's gloves. They're heat resistant enough to handle hot grill grates, and flexible enough to handle tongs. The extra long sleeves even let you reach deep into the firebox to move hot logs without getting burned. Our Fave.

        Click here to read our detailed review

        Click here to order from Amazon


        GrillGrates Take Gas Grills To The Infrared Zone

        grill grates

        GrillGrates(TM) amplify heat, prevent flareups, make flipping foods easier, keep small foods from committing suicide, kill hotspots, are easier to clean, flip over to make a fine griddle, and can be easily removed and moved from one grill to another. You can even throw wood chips, pellets, or sawdust between the rails and deliver a quick burst of smoke to whatever is above. Every gas grill needs them.

        Click here for more about what makes these grates so special


        kareubequ bbq smoker

        Our Favorite Backyard Smoker

        The amazing Karubecue is the most innovative smoker in the world. The quality of meat from this machine is astonishing. At its crux is a patented firebox that burns logs above the cooking chamber and sucks heat and extremely clean blue smoke into the thermostat controlled oven. It is our favorite smoker, period.

        Click here for our review of this superb smoker


        Masterbuilt MPS 340/G ThermoTemp XL Propane Smoker

        masterbuilt gas smoker

        The First Propane Smoker With A Thermostat Makes This Baby Foolproof

        Set ThermoTemp's dial from 175° to 350°F and the thermostat inside will adjust the burner just like an indoor kitchen oven. All you need to do is add wood to the tray above the burner to start smokin'.

        Click here to read our detailed review


        Professional Steakhouse Knife Set

        masterbuilt gas smoker

        Our founder, Meathead, wanted the same steak knives used by steakhouses such as Peter Luger, Smith & Wollensky, Morton's, Kobe Club, Palm, and many others. So he located the manufacturer and had them stamp our name on some. They boast pointed, temper-ground, serrated, high-carbon stainless-steel, half-tang blades with excellent cutting edge ability. The beefy hardwood handle provides a comfortable grip secured by three hefty rivets. He has machine washed his more than 100 times. They have never rusted and they stay shiny without polishing. Please note that we do not make, sell, or distribute these knives, they just engrave them with our name.

        Click here to read our detailed review and to order


        PK 360 grill

        Is This Superb Charcoal Grill A Kamado Killer?

        The PK-360, with 360 square inches of cooking space, this rust free, cast aluminum charcoal grill is durable and easy to use. Four-way venting means it's easy to set up for two zone cooking with more control than single vent Kamado grills. It is much easier to set up for 2-zone cooking than any round kamado. Beautifully designed and completely portable. Meathead says it is his preferrred grill.

        Click here to read our detailed review of the PK 360

        Click here to order it direct from PK and get a special deal for AmazingRibs.com readers only


        Fireboard: The Ultimate Top Of The Line BBQ Thermometer

        fireboard bbq thermometer

        With the ability to monitor up to six temperatures simultaneously with either Bluetooth or Wifi on your mobile phone, tablet, or computer, Fireboard is the best digital thermometer we’ve tested.

        Click here to read our detailed review


        Finally, A Great Portable Pellet Smoker

        Green Mountain Davey Crockett Grill

        Green Mountain's portable Davy Crockett Pellet Smoker is one mean tailgating and picnic machine. But it's also gaining popularity with people who want to add a small, set it and forget it pellet smoker to their backyard arsenal. And with their WiFi capabilities you can control and monitor Davy Crocket from your smart phone or laptop.

        Click here to read our detailed review and to order