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KBQ - The "Maiden Voyage"

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  • kmuoio
    Club Member
    • Jul 2017
    • 19

    #16
    Maiden Voyage Part 2 - Pork Shoulder took a lot longer than expected - but that's likely tied to my need to restart the fire a couple times. Next time, I will start with more lump - I had only used a half chimney and then paid the price. 17 hours for one shoulder - but definitely tied to my lackluster fire building. I'm feeling pretty confident I will get this "right" next time around.

    Attached Files

    Comment


    • lostclusters
      lostclusters commented
      Editing a comment
      I am thinking this is too close to the fence.
      Last edited by lostclusters; September 27th, 2017, 11:45 AM.

    • ComfortablyNumb
      ComfortablyNumb commented
      Editing a comment
      Hopefully it'll just blister the paint! :-) Is it okay to have the thermometer on top of the firebox okay? I think it would be better on top of the control box. I keep mine off the KBQ entirely.

    • Spinaker
      Spinaker commented
      Editing a comment
      Don't be shy when adding lump. You can load that baby up and dump it. The hotter the fire is when you start, the better. Starting with a good solid coal bed makes things much easier as the cook progresses. Best of luck on your second cook. Keep us in the loop.
  • Smokin D
    Club Member
    • Nov 2016
    • 62

    #17
    My first few cooks were steaks. They got progressively easier and better as I learned more about the KBQ. My first real cook was a completely packed run to see just what this baby would do. I did 2 spatchcock chickens, 1 boneless Boston butt, and a full prime packer brisket.
    I purchased a 4" deep steam table pan to use for water and drippings. Very happy with it. Had just a cheep Webber branded probe thermometer which worked out surprisingly well. I have since received a maverick blue tooth 4 channel remote unit. Will be upgrading when funds get back in line. Lol
    The chicken was awesome. My wife doesn't tend to be a chicken fan but she quickly grabbed a bunch to take to work. The Boston Butt turned out fantastic. I have shredded it and been adding fresh salsa, scrambled eggs and cheese to it to make breakfast burritos. They have been a smash hit.
    On a sad note I pulled the brisket out of the crutch at 190f and it plummeted. I decided to ride it out and let it continue unwrapped. I regret that decision. Even with the water pan and all, it is not up to par. Next go round I will be leaving it wrapped until it goes into the cooler for a rest. I would rather sacrifice the crust for a wonderfully moist brisket.

    Learned that my wood was of varying season and some mini logs just didn't burn fast enough to keep up with the heat and coals. Made up for that with hickory chunks. Which burned quickly and coaled well. Due to sizable cost difference tried to keep their use to a minimum. I found that I was tending things much more than every 20-30min which was fine. I love tending a fire. I am glad I had devoted the day to the KBQ and was able to give it the attention it needed.
    Cheers

    Comment


    • EdF
      EdF commented
      Editing a comment
      Like!
  • BBQ_Bill
    Club Member
    • Jun 2017
    • 397
    • Phoenix, Arizona

    #18
    Smokin D
    At the end of your brisket rest, the bark WILL be mushy and some of the flavor will be "washed out" so to speak.
    Simply pull, CAREFULLY unwrap, and GENTLY place the packer BACK into your (no water pan this time) KBQ at FULL THROTTLE.
    Leave it there for 20 minutes.
    Check the bark at the 20 minute mark to see if it has dried/solidified and set back up.
    (When set, it will not "slide" when pressed down and gently moved sideways)
    If not, add 10 minutes more heat and smoke and check it again.
    Keep doing this 10 minute thing until it has dried up a bit, solidified and set.
    This bark restoring treatment however, should set up the bark and make it happen in 20 minutes to 45 minutes or so.
    -
    With the convection drying action, the bark will set up and the extra smoke will "touch up" the flavor.
    Try it!

    Comment


    • EdF
      EdF commented
      Editing a comment
      Great tip. Thanks!
  • kmuoio
    Club Member
    • Jul 2017
    • 19

    #19
    Beef Ribs this Wednesday - not my Maiden Voyage on the KBQ, but first time with Beef Ribs and still a KBQ newbie and looking for guidance.

    Here is my plan:
    1) 24 hours of dry brining - will cut Beef Ribs into 2 rib sections
    2) slather with mustard + Meatheads Big Bad Beef Rub
    3) KBQ at 250 (lots of conflicting info on this -- Aaron Franklin says 285 and Meathead says 225)
    4) water pan at bottom of KBQ
    5) Expecting this to take 10 hours (6 lbs of Beef Ribs - including bones)
    6) Will spritz with water every hour after the 5 hour mark
    7) Look to hit internal temp of 203 degrees
    8) Let Beef Ribs rest for 30 minutes before serving

    What am I missing? Any other thoughts here? Or changes I should make to my plan?
    Last edited by kmuoio; October 30th, 2017, 01:12 PM.

    Comment


    • kmuoio
      kmuoio commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks EdF and RonB.

      Wood is roughly between 15 - 18% water, so water pan is not needed, in your opinion, Ed. I'll try it without.

      Ron - thanks for the tip of letting the ribs rest. I will budget more time for that.
      Raises another question -- rest the beef ribs at room temperature or in a faux cambro?

    • EdF
      EdF commented
      Editing a comment
      faux cambro would be my wager.

    • RonB
      RonB commented
      Editing a comment
      What Ed said.
  • Spinaker
    Moderator
    • Nov 2014
    • 9747
    • Land of Tonka
    • John "J R"
      Instagram: JRBowlsby
      Smokin' Hound Que
      Minnesota/ United States of America

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    #20
    Originally posted by kmuoio View Post
    Beef Ribs this Wednesday - not my Maiden Voyage on the KBQ, but first time with Beef Ribs and still a KBQ newbie and looking for guidance.

    Here is my plan:
    1) 24 hours of dry brining - will cut Beef Ribs into 2 rib sections
    2) slather with mustard + Meatheads Big Bad Beef Rub
    3) KBQ at 250 (lots of conflicting info on this -- Aaron Franklin says 285 and Meathead says 225)
    4) Expecting this to take 10 hours (6 lbs of Beef Ribs - including bones)
    5) Will spritz with water every hour after the 5 hour mark
    6) Look to hit internal temp of 203 degrees
    7) Let Beef Ribs rest for 30 minutes before serving

    What am I missing? Any other thoughts here? Or changes I should make to my plan?
    1) Perfect
    2) IMHO, you don't need to slather with the mustard. You can but I have never found it to be essential. The rub will adhere just fine with a damp meat surface.
    3,5)KBQ at 250 F sounds pretty good. Don't worry about nailing an exact temp. Your KBQ will fluctuate, just like an indoor oven. So if you are setting it for 250F, it will average 250 F, not keep it there indefinitely. Suggested temps are guidelines, not set in stone. What works for some, doesn't always work for others. Plus, the KBQ acts like a convection oven, so it will cook much faster than other cookers you are used too. Plan on 10, but don't be surprised if it is one waaaaay faster than that. Especially with that small of a rack of beef ribs. I would bet you will be there at about 5-6 hours @ 250 F The KBQ can power through a stall like it's nothing, and with beef ribs, I have found that this is the case more often that not.
    5) I skip the Spritz, I did it for one cook and I did not see the benefit. The KBQ throws so much flavor in the box, that anything you spritz on is drowned out by the smokey nirvana that is the KBQ. (IMHO)
    6) Finishing temp sounds good, but make sure to check for probe tenderness at around 195 F or so.

    Comment

    • kmuoio
      Club Member
      • Jul 2017
      • 19

      #21
      OK -- Aaron Franklin talks about this probe tenderness - the "melted butter" feel. I think I'm going to start testing around 180 to see what "tough" feels like so that I'll know when tenderness sets in.

      Does 195 F and "probe tenderness" mean these beef ribs are done?

      Comment


      • RonB
        RonB commented
        Editing a comment
        You don't have to go to 195* and probe temp - think sous vide. If you maintain a lower temp long enough, it should be tender. It's the tender part that's important.

      • Spinaker
        Spinaker commented
        Editing a comment
        As my friend Ron mentions, probe tenderness is all that matters, temps are suggestions. So around 195 F things can be probe tender. Sometimes its hotter. I find that it is usually at that 202 F mark. 195 F is just where I start.
    • BBQ_Bill
      Club Member
      • Jun 2017
      • 397
      • Phoenix, Arizona

      #22
      kmuoio you are using a KBQ, with a fan moving hot air around.
      Aaron is using a large off-set smoker, with air flow, but NOTHING like the air movement in a KBQ.
      Aaron's temperatures are hotter but when I did my 1st beef ribs trying to follow his instructions, I was running WAY too hot at 275°F.
      My ribs were "sizzling" like crazy and basically drying out terribly, yeah... they were dehydrating.
      BAD!
      -
      So...
      I kept at it, trying this and that until I got them to come out really good.
      Took awhile, but my beef ribs are now "To Die For" according to my customers and eaters.
      -
      Take heart...
      Beef Plate Ribs (the BIG 'uns) are easier than brisket to master, by far.
      Start by following Aaron Franklin's video on Beef Ribs.
      Trim the heavy thick fat off, but leave a layer.
      Go bone side down in the KBQ.
      I put a water pan in the bottom and another in the lower slot to make a channel for the hot air to move through and pick up moisture.
      A heavier rub than what is used on Beef Brisket is good for me because they are quite fatty and can handle it.
      My very best temperature has been 235°F. (AVERAGE)
      The fat renders but they don't start sizzling at that temperature.
      Top poppet completely closed and bottom poppet full open.
      Firebox lid on.
      I spritz mine every 45 minutes until they hit about 150°F.
      I then spritz every 30 minutes from 150°F to 175°F.
      Finally, I spritz every 15 minutes from 175°F until done.
      Just remember that towards the end they will dry out quite easily so keeping them moist is important.
      Aaron said this and it really is a fact in my experiences.
      -
      Rotate and move them if you have any that seem to be "in a hot spot".
      Especially towards the back by the manifold.
      Watch for sizzling and spritz that sizzle to stop it and drop the heat by 5°F.
      -
      They will generally probe quite tender when done, but check out Aaron's instruction about pushing the probe through the membrane.
      GOOD info there.
      -
      I have had so many positive comments and orders for Beef Ribs it is unbelievable.
      The KBQ produces bark on beef ribs that will "blow you away" my friend!
      -
      Click image for larger version  Name:	Cryovac Beef Ribs.jpg Views:	1 Size:	2.22 MB ID:	403960
      Click image for larger version  Name:	Sweet!.jpg Views:	1 Size:	161.3 KB ID:	403961

      Smoke On!
      Last edited by BBQ_Bill; October 30th, 2017, 11:17 PM. Reason: Added more info for clarification

      Comment


      • EdF
        EdF commented
        Editing a comment
        Really helpful, BBQ_Bill!

      • BBQ_Bill
        BBQ_Bill commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks bro!
    • BBQ_Bill
      Club Member
      • Jun 2017
      • 397
      • Phoenix, Arizona

      #23
      Please note that your spritz can be almost anything, but alcohol seems to make things bitter for me so I went with Aaron's Apple Cider Vinegar and it is good.
      You will NOT get a lot flavor from spritz, BUT spritz is important to me for two reasons:
      1) It keeps the surfaces from drying out.
      2) It causes the surface to attract smoke. (Creating more luscious bark)
      -
      Your ribs will attract more smoke because of two things spritzing does.
      1) It cools the surface in which a cooler surface attracts more smoke.
      2) It moistens the surface, in which a moist surface attracts more smoke.
      -
      Go HERE for for the science of it all.
      This link/page contains Dr. Blonder's information regarding smoke adhesion to your meats.
      (Great Info)

      Smoke On!
      Last edited by BBQ_Bill; October 30th, 2017, 11:04 PM. Reason: Added more info

      Comment


      • kmuoio
        kmuoio commented
        Editing a comment
        BBQ_Bill - thanks for all of this detail. I'll share details on my progress

      • BBQ_Bill
        BBQ_Bill commented
        Editing a comment
        You are welcome my friend.
        I have brisket and beef ribs down.
        For other things, ask some other smoking dude or smoking dudette.
        Last edited by BBQ_Bill; November 1st, 2017, 08:56 AM. Reason: Clarify that there are guys and gals that know how to smoke meats ;)
    • kmuoio
      Club Member
      • Jul 2017
      • 19

      #24
      Thanks BBQ_Bill, EdF, Spinaker, RonB - so here's what happened with my Beef Ribs maiden voyage:
      • Cook Time was 7 hours! So glad I was paying attention! 10 hours would have been a disaster!
      • Rotated Beef Ribs around 5 hours - next time, I'll likely do this more frequently (and earlier in cook) as the ribs towards the middle / back of the KBQ rack cooked WAY faster - were done much sooner. Rack height in KBQ seemed to have less impact than distance from manifold (@BBQ_Bill - you mentioned this - now I know what you mean)
      • My wife (who is not a big fan of smoke) said these Beef Ribs were her favorite thing that I've smoked. They were really great and I know I can improve on them next time
      • I did use water pan as earlier smokes have been dry - I didn't spritz though.
      • Fire went out on me once - easy to restore. Actually this probably saved ribs from being destroyed as they may have been done at 5 hours and I wouldn't have expected that
      • "Butter" feel of the meat was very easy to test for. Thought I wouldn't recognize it with my limited experience, but it was really obvious.
      • KBQ getting easier and easier to use - not as stressful as first few cooks.
      • As a novice, I have no right to prepare BBQ that tastes this good. It's like cheating!


      Attached Files

      Comment


      • ComfortablyNumb
        ComfortablyNumb commented
        Editing a comment
        Spinaker Just playing with you!

      • Spinaker
        Spinaker commented
        Editing a comment
        hahaha, yeah I know. The old water pan argument gets me going sometimes. My apologies if I came off a little heavy handed. ComfortablyNumb

      • kmuoio
        kmuoio commented
        Editing a comment
        Meat was very moist - Spinaker I'll try the next few cooks without the water pan and see what happens. My first cook (pork ribs) were really dry - but that could've been from it being my true KBQ maiden voyage.
    • BBQ_Bill
      Club Member
      • Jun 2017
      • 397
      • Phoenix, Arizona

      #25
      Spinaker my friend... I hope we can agree to disagree about water in the KBQ.
      My problem was two-fold... and needed a solution.
      My briskets were turning into "Rocks" on the bottom side of the meat.
      With 4 briskets, this was happening on the very bottom rack of my KBQs.
      Note that this problem was NOT a one-time oddity, this was happening over and over.
      -
      They were SO BAD that I could not cut through the bottom of that #4 brisket (Please see my drawing) with a very good solid knife.
      I basically, had to "Hammer" my way through about 1/4" of hard, dry meat on the bottom of the flat on # 4 brisket and sometimes the edges of #3.
      I started rotating like crazy, every 45 minutes.
      # 4 went to the # 1 rack, #3 went to the # 2 rack.
      Everything got 180° rotations. It was a real drag!
      Upon contacting Bill Karau about this problem, he stated that the meat was simply "dehydrating."
      We are talking about a lack of moisture inside the KBQ here and the dry intense heat simply drying out the meat...
      Bill went on to say that there is a very large amount of heat that makes it to the bottom of the manifold in the rear of the KBQ cooking chamber.
      This heat was basically dehydrating the meat on the bottom side, and making it very much like hard jerky.
      Upon opening the wrapping paper, placing it on the cutting board, and slicing the meat, I told my customers that this hard meat was so good (the dry meat) that there were arguments as to who got this part of the brisket.
      (Yup... I was not telling the whole truth and nothing but the truth)
      It WAS a very tasty jerky, but NOT what I was wanting to slice, weigh up, and sell.
      -
      Bill Karau stated the following... "Aaron Franklin says to use a water pan, so who am I to argue?"
      He went on to say... "Put a full-sized pan in-between the bottom rack of meat, in the bottom slot to keep the intense heat off of the bottom of that lower brisket."
      And...
      He suggested I go with Fat Side Down to help prevent dehydration as well.
      I decided to start using a water pan in all of my cooks and a barrier channel in the bottom of my KBQs to direct the intense heat from the bottom of the cooking chamber away from the bottom of that lowest brisket.
      [Go HERE (post #4) to see a photo of this set up]
      The results of adding water:
      1) My fan blades then became much more covered with smoke after each cook (The difference was very obvious)
      2) My product overall had a thicker bark.
      3) My bottom product no longer dried out.
      I had been using a stainless steel water pan in-between the fire and the meat for many many years in my off-set smokers.
      Now, in my KBQs, this water pan was placed in-between the main heat source, and the bottom meat (Brisket) in my KBQ.
      -
      After I added this barrier, went fat side down, and moved all meat AWAY from the manifold and towards the door, my dehydrated meat problems went away.
      Please note that the heavy black areas on the meat in my drawing were dehydrated, I am talking "big time" dry.
      This problem had very little to do with the quality of the prime brisket I am using.
      So...
      Water and spritzing aside... at the VERY least, I STRONGLY suggest that one move the meats away from the back of the cooking chamber, more towards the door, and go fat cap side/bone side down, with the point or fatty end of a brisket towards the manifold.

      Respectfully,
      BBQ_Bill
      Last edited by BBQ_Bill; October 17th, 2018, 10:16 PM. Reason: Updated the Link to go directly to the Post ;)

      Comment


      • Spinaker
        Spinaker commented
        Editing a comment
        To each their own, my friend. I always cook my briskets fat-side down. I do use a pan on the bottom of my KBQ, to catch drippings. That pan is empty when I put it into the KBQ. I think this helps to shield the briskets from the high heat at the bottom of the KBQ.

      • Spinaker
        Spinaker commented
        Editing a comment
        Honestly, I have not had any briskets turn to jerky on the under-side. So I suppose that may be because I always cook fat-side down and I use an empty pan to block that heat at the bottom. I am firing up this weekend, so maybe I will add a water pan to see what happens.

      • BBQ_Bill
        BBQ_Bill commented
        Editing a comment
        Agreed.
        Fat side down is the ONLY way I cook/smoke brisket now
    • DSiewert
      Charter Member
      • Sep 2014
      • 24

      #26
      The comments about dry meat surprises me. I've been using the KBQ without a water pan, and without spritzing and I've had amazing results. I'm wondering if some of the problems are due to using kiln dried wood. I've found a local firewood supplier that will sell fresh-cut wood. I've used mostly oak and hickory. I've tried apple and cherry, but when I'm pulling clean smoke, it doesn't seem to make much difference. Clean smoke seems to be largely species agnostic. I stack the wood and let it sit about 3 or 4 months before using, but I suspect it still has considerable water content. Kiln dried wood will burn quicker and not supply the moister to the cook chamber that the design expects. I do have a one inch hotel pan in the bottom slot to catch drippings and make clean-up easier.

      Comment


      • EdF
        EdF commented
        Editing a comment
        That matches my experience so far.

      • BBQ_Bill
        BBQ_Bill commented
        Editing a comment
        My wood is straight from the location it was harvested, no kiln drying.
        I would tend to agree that the problem revolves around the location of the meat next to the manifold as well as the fact that a majority of the heat comes from the bottom.
    • BBQ_Bill
      Club Member
      • Jun 2017
      • 397
      • Phoenix, Arizona

      #27
      My experience with both of my KBQ's using Oak, Mesquite, Pecan and Apple wood is that meat towards the back, if too close to the manifold tends to dry out quicker.
      I've noticed that the meat is darker on the end near the back of the cooking chamber, but it gets hit with the smoke and ash and heat before the rest gets anything, so that is a consideration as well.
      For me, thin cuts of meat when placed closer to the manifold seem to suffer from drying out more than thin cuts in the middle of the chamber.
      Also have seen others photos of KBQ meat still sitting on the racks, and the end of the meat positioned closer to the manifold is darker, so I assume it is also dryer?
      There is more air movement right next to the manifold, so to me, that would seem to make items in the direct "path" of that hot air dry out faster.
      -
      In cooking somewhere close to 150 briskets, I have discovered that by placing the fatty end (point) of the brisket towards the source of the heat which in our machines is the manifold, and then keeping it positioned closer to the door helped to keep the moisture higher in the areas towards the rear of the cooking chamber.
      And, spritzing that area more has helped my cooks as well.
      -
      I called Bill Karau quite awhile ago, and explained that my brisket on the bottom rack was like a rock, and he asked me if I was going with fat side down.
      When I said, "No, I am cooking fat side up." He suggested that I try "Fat Side Down" on my next cook.
      I am pretty sure that this action alone will prevent the meat from drying out like it was.
      We all know that the fat cap and the layer of fat on one side of a packer brisket is a great barrier against whatever heat source is used to cook it with.
      -
      Mr. Karau is also the one that explained that the majority of the heat goes to the bottom of the cooking chamber in the KBQ, and suggested the "slot" idea.
      I am pretty sure that the drip pan deflects that major "bottom" heat to the sides, thus helping disburse and distribute it as well.
      In this discussion I mentioned to Bill Karau that I was going to use my Kestrel and a plastic front on the KBQ to actually record the velocity of the air as it comes out of the manifold.
      This way, I could intelligently adjust the manifold louvers to achieve an even airflow and thus a better heat distribution throughout the entire rear area of the KBQ cooking chamber.
      -
      Back on the moisture in the cooking chamber note...
      There are some well known cooks that use a water pan, and some well known cooks that do not.
      There are also some that spritz such as Aaron Franklin or mop like Tootsie Tomanetz and others that do not.
      I personally spritz and use a water pan because I like the results I get with them.
      I've tried going totally dry and the meat was not as moist for me.
      It could have been a total coincidence, but simple logic tells me that meat loses moisture as it cooks if the chamber has less moisture than the meat has.
      Also...
      Adding moisture (more than what is inherently in the wood) cools the meats surface, and that fact alone attracts more smoke to the meat surface as proven scientifically.
      A damp, moist surface also helps to built better bark for me, and most all LUV that bark, no?
      -
      Your KBQ fan blades will tell you if there is plenty of moisture in your smoke as they will grow "bark" as they become moist and the smoke adheres to them.
      -
      As for me, I will continue to cook with added moisture and hold my product with added moisture.
      The bottom line was spoken well by others here, "To each his or her own."
      BBQ Bill
      Last edited by BBQ_Bill; November 12th, 2017, 04:26 PM. Reason: Typo Correction

      Comment


      • kmuoio
        kmuoio commented
        Editing a comment
        Not sure where to put this, so going to stick it here in connection with your comment about the bark on the fan blades. Anyone up for making a YouTube video of cleaning the control box? I haven't cleaned it since my August purchase and I'm guessing I'll need to clean it soon or risk damage. Anybody willing to create a video of their next full KBQ cleaning?

      • ComfortablyNumb
        ComfortablyNumb commented
        Editing a comment
        kmuoio I never have to worry about being unsure of where to put something as it seems there is no shortage of people telling me where to stick it......
    • BBQ_Bill
      Club Member
      • Jun 2017
      • 397
      • Phoenix, Arizona

      #28

      Bill Karau in his KBQ Owners Manual on page 12 of 12 states the following:

      Every 100 operating hours:
      1. Invert the Control box on a table or bench.
      2. Using an old toothbrush and/or compressed air (the canned stuff works OK), clean most of the accumulated soot from the fan blades and the spring sensor retainer assembly. There’s no need to be fastidious - the radial impellers are designed to run dirty.
      3. Check that the fan blade tips are co-planar by manually spinning the blade and eyeballing it from the side. Push/pull any errant blade tips into alignment with your fingers.
      DO NOT USE LIQUID DEGREASER ON YOUR CONTROL BOX - IT’LL RUN DOWN THE MOTOR SHAFTS AND DEGREASE THE BEARINGS, TOO.
      DOING SO WILL VOID THE WARRANTY

      Comment


      • EdF
        EdF commented
        Editing a comment
        That is a great tip about the canned air. Thanks!

      • BBQ_Bill
        BBQ_Bill commented
        Editing a comment
        kmuoio basically, I clean my control boxes after each smoke with an old toothbrush and compressed air.
        Be sure to clean the soot off of the spring enclosed sensor, or your on/off temperatures will start to get weird on you.
    • BBQ_Bill
      Club Member
      • Jun 2017
      • 397
      • Phoenix, Arizona

      #29
      overeasy
      Welcome to The Pit!
      -
      Your question is an odd one where you said...
      "Fired up my new (KBQ) cooker today for three slabs of spare ribs.
      The ribs cooked beautifully but I'm very surprised how little smoke there is on them.
      Almost like oven roasted.
      Both poppet valves were open for the whole cook.
      I'm using oak for fuel.
      Very surprised by the lack of smoke.
      Any ideas for increasing the smoke flavor?"

      -
      Well...
      the very first thing that comes to mind is the length of time in the smoke.
      Next, Oak is quite mild in it's flavor, with Mesquite and Hickory generally having a stronger flavor profile.
      The real question is this...
      Did you keep the lid on between wood adds?
      With the lid on, a larger amount of smoke is "forced" through the coals and into the cooking chamber.
      Also, at what temperature did you smoke them at?
      I am thinking "Hot and Fast" would mean less time in the smoke.
      Last edited by BBQ_Bill; November 12th, 2017, 09:57 PM. Reason: Still thinking about this problem and adding more info as it comes to mind...

      Comment

      • overeasy
        Club Member
        • Nov 2017
        • 116
        • Sacramento Ca.
        • Ironside Cabinet CDR "coming soon"
          Karubecue C-60
          Old Country Pecos Offset
          Webber Kettle

        #30
        Well my temps were 250 -265. And no I left the top off the whole cook! I haven't seen anything that mentioned the top and using it
        during the cook and why until now. Thank you! Will give that a try next time. I used a hotel pan with water on bottom rack. They were done in about 4:20 hrs
        Nice, tender and moist. Just no smoke.
        Thanks for the help,
        Dave

        Comment

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