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3 stalls and only at 180?

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    3 stalls and only at 180?

    Sunday I did a 3.6 lb bone-in butt in my 22.5" WSM. This is only my third one so far. The oven temp was holding a steady temp of about 235°. It hit a stall at 150° for about 2 hours. It hit another stall at 165°. I let the oven temp go up to 170° to help speed it through and let it slowly drop back to 230ish. The stall was about an hour. Then about 10 1/2 hours into the cook it hit another stall at 185°. It was still there at the 11 hour mark. Errr!

    It's now 6 pm and the wife and I are ready to eat. So I go ahead and stick a fork in it. The fork turns easily and it tastes great. I go ahead and take it off and it easily comes off the bone.

    Are 3 stalls before it hits 190° normal? Had I been able to stick it out until it hit 203° could I have hit a 4th stall and would the wait, as good as it already was, taken it to a whole nother level of deliciousness? Wish I had the time to find out.

    Thanks for any thoughts!

    #2
    Correction...my 3rd stall was at 180°

    Comment


      #3
      I have never had an unwrapped butt make it to 203 internal running under 250 degrees. Typically they are plenty done by 195 internal.

      Running 280-325 in the Pit Barrel I have gotten them to 203 with minimal stalls.

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        #4
        I typically have to go up to 280 or so for the last couple of hours to get an internal temp of 203. I don't think it matters much how you get there once the bark has formed, as long as you don't start burning the exterior.

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          #5
          If you keep it at a high enough temp long enough, it will be tender, so if it's taking an extra long time, you need to check for tenderness early, (as you did). I've never had anything go through three stalls...

          Comment


            #6
            Need more practice and documentation. Frankly, butts are so forgiving that I haven't monitored it much. Just cook until they are tender.

            To be honest, I've been busy/distracted on many of my butt cooks, and some of them were a shade overcooked, meaning way tender and 205+ temp, as to my being busy/distracted. So money muscle slices were a "no" if you let them go that long. However, for pulled pork, it still worked great.

            You are reminding me I need to cook some more pork butts and dial in my process!

            Happy cooking!

            Comment


            • Jerod Broussard
              Jerod Broussard commented
              Editing a comment
              Get your butt to the butts. I am awaiting to see how many I have to cook for Thursday night. They are hoping for 250-ish. Be my biggest butt cook yet.

            • fuzzydaddy
              fuzzydaddy commented
              Editing a comment
              Gee, my measly ~40 butts seems so tiny.

            #7
            It's now a 48 hr leftover. I just had a bite of a piece with the bark. Still delicious. I guess the bottom line is is it cooked to perfection or not? I'm finding out how forgiving and flexible a butt can be. But what about that goal of 203° that MH suggests. Is this something magical?

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            • Jerod Broussard
              Jerod Broussard commented
              Editing a comment
              If you wrap around the stall taking it to about 203 is probably necessary. It is a temp + time thing. Leaving unwrapped extends the cooking time.

            #8
            Thanks all for your help. I have a couple of questions still. I will have to wait until after work this afternoon. Have a great day!

            Comment


              #9
              What Jerod Broussard said!!! The end temp is not cast in stone critical. Low and slow "tenderness" is a result of the amount of time above the temp at which collagen starts to melt. That actually begins as low as 135-140, but can take days at that temp (e.g. sous vide) . The "end temp" is just an average of what a cut of meat usually reaches when subjected to "low" bbq cooking temps for enough time. Longer time at a somewhat lower temp still equals tender.

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                #10
                I never wrap/crutch pork butts to deal with the stall and I never get to 203. I typically take them off at 195'ish and hold in the oven for an hour, in foil, at 175. In my opinion, once you're over 190, the temp is a guideline. It's all about that fork twist or bone wiggle.

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                • HawkerXP
                  HawkerXP commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I use the bone wiggle as well.

                • ecowper
                  ecowper commented
                  Editing a comment
                  A lot of times I'm using Costco's boneless pork butts and have to do a fork twist.
                  Last edited by ecowper; July 29, 2016, 09:48 PM.

                #11
                I rarely wrap the 10 pound butts I cook at 225 and take them to an internal temp of 200 in 12-16 hours.

                Comment


                  #12
                  STALL RECOVERY.
                  In all upset situations, it is necessary to recover from a stall before applying any other recovery actions. To recover from the stall, angle of attack must be reduced below the stalling angle. Nose-down pitch control must be applied and maintained until the wings are unstalled. Under certain conditions, on airplanes with underwing-mounted engines, it may be necessary to reduce some thrust in order to prevent the angle of attack from continuing to increase. Once unstalled, upset recovery actions may be taken and thrust reapplied as needed.

                  oops. sorry. Wrong forum.

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                  • Ribber
                    Ribber commented
                    Editing a comment
                    LOL! You sound like my brother-in-law...and Dad!

                  • Jerod Broussard
                    Jerod Broussard commented
                    Editing a comment

                  #13
                  Click image for larger version

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                  yo Curling Dog! This guy did not recover from said stall.

                  Comment


                    #14
                    Click image for larger version

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                    yo Curling Dog! This guy did not recover from said stall.

                    Comment


                      #15
                      My guess is your three stalls were a result of your temp changes. The meat wasn't sweating enough moisture to stall when the pit was in the 270 range, but once you got to a lower temp the "meat sweat" was sufficient to offset the reduced temp and airflow, thus causing a second and even third stall.

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