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Eating in the '50s

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    Eating in the '50s

    "Pasta" was not used...it was either macaroni or spaghetti.
    All chips were plain.
    Oil was for lubricating; fat was for cooking.
    Tea was made in a teapot using tea leaves and never green.
    Chickens didn't have fingers in those days.
    None of us had ever heard of yogurt.
    Seaweed was not a recognized food.
    Raw seafood was used only as bait while fishing.
    Sugar enjoyed a good rep and was regarded as being white gold.
    Cubed sugar was regarded as ritzy.
    Prunes were medicinal and stewed.
    Pineapples came in chunks or were round with a hole in the middle, in a can.
    Water came out of the tap. If someone had suggested bottling it and selling it, they would have been laughed out of town.
    There were three things that we never had on/at our tables: Elbow, Hats, Cell phones.
    We had only two choices for each meal.....Take it or Leave it!

    #2
    You may have just dated yerself there young fella.
    Most veggies came in a can unless ya lived on a farm.
    Milk was delivered to yer door.
    Coffee was made in a percolator
    Porkchops were skinny.
    Bread was white & thin.
    Big entertainment was readin Burma Shave signs whilst on vacation.
    Girls wore pedal pushers & boys had flat tops fer haircuts.
    Last edited by FireMan; April 25, 2021, 04:38 PM.

    Comment


    • Willy
      Willy commented
      Editing a comment
      I miss Burma Shave signs.

    • Mr. Bones
      Mr. Bones commented
      Editing a comment
      Willy
      Train Approachin
      Whistle Squealin
      Pause, Avoid dat
      Rundown Feelin!

      Burma Shave

    • bardsleyque
      bardsleyque commented
      Editing a comment
      potato chips in a box with two bags

    #3
    I grew up in the 60’s and 70’s and I think the only difference I would make to that list is that we did know about yogurt :-)

    Comment


    • Steve B
      Steve B commented
      Editing a comment
      Just wouldn't eat it

    #4
    Looking at the mid-century cookbooks, food was also bland. Plus they invented such great menu items such as the Spaghetti-O's jello mold.

    Comment


    • USMCCrashCrew89
      USMCCrashCrew89 commented
      Editing a comment
      Parents grew up in the 50s &60s. As a kid, the only seasonings in the house were table salt and ketchup. Luckily I was spared the gelatin creations you see in ads from back in the day.

    • HawkerXP
      HawkerXP commented
      Editing a comment
      You don't have to reminisce about eating in the 50's. We could all head over to 58limited's house I'm sure his 1950 refrigerators are full of 1950's food.

    • Jared49
      Jared49 commented
      Editing a comment
      Orange jello with shredded carrots and pineapple constituted a salad!!

    #5
    All except one are spot on. Lox, cold smoked
    ​​​​​Nova Salmon was a staple while growing up. Sundays were dad go to local store get fresh baked bagels, lox and cream cheese. Still a regular here for me. Just took out from freezer the last 2 bagels from New Yorker Bagels. Tommrows breakfast. Lox these days from Trader Joe's.
    Also remember going to a diner with my parents. At the table was the sugar cubes. I was allowed to pop a couple.


    Comment


    • ecowper
      ecowper commented
      Editing a comment
      We used to go to the local diner for supper after church on Sunday. And I would order an iced tea so I could get sugar cubes from the waitress. Totally fancy.

    • TripleB
      TripleB commented
      Editing a comment
      Lox, eggs & onions one of my favorite breakfast dishes. I remember always waiting on Mickey Kissler when we were kids to play kick-the-can. He'd come running out of the house with his shoes in one hand and a bagel w/ cream cheese in the other.

    • SheilaAnn
      SheilaAnn commented
      Editing a comment
      @TirpleB kick the can was the best!

    #6
    I am also a 60's/70's child.
    Playing cards were often used attached to the spokes of you bicycle with clothes pins.
    We often hung our clothes out to dry on lines using clothes pins.
    We had 1 speed bikes. High handlebar, banana seat bikes were cool.
    3 & 5 speed bikes were top of the line.
    Stayed out after dinner until it got dark or your dad whistled (could hear my dad's whistle for at least a half mile).
    Sunday nights were for Disney and Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom.
    H R Pufnstuf was cool to watch without weed (too young and didn't know what it was).

    Comment


    • ecowper
      ecowper commented
      Editing a comment
      I spent Saturday roaming in the hills behind the house with my best friend. We both took our BB guns with us. Shot squirrels when we weren’t busy shooting each other :-D

    • TripleB
      TripleB commented
      Editing a comment
      Oh yeah. I remember those schwinn sting-rays with the 5 speed shifter on the frame. The envy of the neighborhood.
      I remember when you bought ticket coupons for rides at Disneyland. E tickets were for the big rides and you could reuse your tickets the next time you went to Disneyland and you'd trade tickets with your friends. The one ticket that was always left over and no kid ever wanted......the A ticket (animatronic Great moments with Mr. Lincoln).

    #7
    We would hardly play board games UNLESS we built a fort. Then you couldn’t tear us away and we stayed up all night.
    Playing kick the can until the street lights came on.
    Selling Girl Scout cookies door-to-door.
    Jumping on a trampoline with out a cage.
    drinking out of the hose.
    running through sprinklers until the yard was a mud hole.
    listening to 8-track tapes

    Comment


    • ecowper
      ecowper commented
      Editing a comment
      8-track tapes!!!! Best thing about drinking from the hose was after the water was running a bit and the cold water from underground hit. So good. Had no idea that there were any shoes other than converse and cowboy boots.

    #8
    Ahhhh you all brought back some memeries SPAM, TV dinners, Tuna casserol, Foundue, frozen pizza, Pot pie's,
    I'm not sure when it started but I remimber my dad making fried baloney sandwich. YAK, don't think I could choke one down now.

    Lawrence Welk

    Gun smoke
    Last edited by randy56; April 25, 2021, 05:59 PM.

    Comment


    • SheilaAnn
      SheilaAnn commented
      Editing a comment
      randy56 we called them monkey helmets because of the way they cupped when frying. And served on wonder bread, of course.

      And Lawrence Welk was called “bubbles” in my house.

    • ecowper
      ecowper commented
      Editing a comment
      Pot pies .... by the way, the chicken pot pies at Costco will make you think it is Friday night on TV trays in 1974 with mom and dad

    • Soonerpop
      Soonerpop commented
      Editing a comment
      BUT.... a SMOKED bologna chub, aka Oklahoma sirloin, is wonderful! Now I think I’ll smoke one this week!

    #9
    In the 50’s and early 60’s we hadn’t heard of pizza. My Mom took us to visit one of my aunts who had married a GI from New Jersey during the war. They offered to take us out to eat pizza, which we had never heard of, so we had hamburgers instead.

    Comment


      #10
      We got our first tv in the fifties. It was huge, but the screen was tiny. I'd guess 9" to 12" if my memory is even close. In the early '60s, one of my chores was to take the tubes from the tv to the local drug store and test 'em when the tv stopped working. I rode my one speed bike the mile or so to the drugstore. If I had any allowance left, I'd buy some candy while I was there. I learned that chocolate bars were not somethin' to put in your pocket on the ride home - especially in hot weather.

      Nabs cane in a four pack for a nickel. Cokes were a nickel for an 8 oz bottle. Comic books were 10 cents and I'd ride up and down the road lookin' for bottles so I could get 2 cents each and buy more comics.

      We almost never ate out, but when we did, I loved the "fancy" crackers they gave us.

      Ater reading Donw 's post above, I didn't have pizza until I was a teenager, and probably did not know what it was. Some friends and I went to a movie, and after someone suggested we go to an Italian restaurant. We shared several pizzas. Boy - that was an eye opener.
      Last edited by RonB; April 25, 2021, 08:20 PM.

      Comment


      • glitchy
        glitchy commented
        Editing a comment
        We had color TV’s in the 80’s, but my brother and I were the remote control. It was super exciting when Fox started airing and we got to 5 channels. Our Fox affiliate had great after school cartoons like He Man and Transformers.

      • smokin fool
        smokin fool commented
        Editing a comment
        We had old B&W's that had more lines across the screen than a school book.
        My father had no interest in a color TV until he saw a Hockey Night in Canada game on a neighbor's color TV....color TV entered our house the very next day.
        Big thing in the GTA was getting Buffalo stations across the lake.
        Dude if you got a Buffalo station you were high faloutin'.

      • Willy
        Willy commented
        Editing a comment
        Aaaahhh...I remember taking TV tubes to the drug store for testing. Using masking tape to ID each one and its location in TV. That is post 1975-ish when I finally lived in a town that had a drug store.

      #11
      So, this has since changed, in yalls geographical / demographical location???

      Wanna take a roadtrip to my Hometown???

      Comment


      • Mr. Bones
        Mr. Bones commented
        Editing a comment
        LINK 1

        LINK 2

        LINK 3
        Last edited by Mr. Bones; April 26, 2021, 11:48 AM.

      • Donw
        Donw commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks Bonsey for the tour. Now about that last video. While our family owned those trucks, we never grew a crop of women who looked like those in the video.🙂

      • Mr. Bones
        Mr. Bones commented
        Editing a comment
        Yeah, Brother Donw They musta been able to afford WAY better seeds than us poor ol country f***s

      #12
      We didn't eat out even once that I can remember in the 50s. Meals were eaten at home. Breakfast was malto meal or oat meal. Lunch was usually a sandwich of some sort, like fried bologna. Dinner was when the good stuff came out. Chicken fried steak, a combination of macaroni, tomato sauce, and hamburger know to us as goulash, fried okra or squash from the garden, or the dreaded super greasie meat loaf were some of the usual stuff. The 60s were a whole new ball game. They built a Dairy Queen like drive in across the street from the school. No one wanted to eat at the lunchroom any more. My sons still find it hard to believe that in 1968 I could eat lunch at the drive inn for 50 cents. A hamburger was 25 cents, fries were 15 cents, and a fountain coke was 10 cents, it was a good meal. At the same time my after school and weekend job doing farm work paid $1.25 per hour.

      Comment


      • Mr. Bones
        Mr. Bones commented
        Editing a comment
        I do miss them ¢25 hamburgers...

      • Mr. Bones
        Mr. Bones commented
        Editing a comment
        Memories....

      #13
      We got our first TV in the early 60s. Dad had to put up the antenna on a 30 foot pole to get any reception at all. There were 2 available stations. To change the channel, you had to turn the dial on the TV and go outside a turn the pole to point the antenna in the right direction.

      Comment


      • SheilaAnn
        SheilaAnn commented
        Editing a comment
        Everything old is new again.... we became cord cutters (got rid of cable) and now we have to adjust the antenna to make sure we get our local channels. Sigh.

        First world problems.

      • smokin fool
        smokin fool commented
        Editing a comment
        SheilaAnn We're attempting the cord cutting thing too.
        Brought a couple of Firesticks for our TV's.
        Only thing holding us back is the lack of live TV options.
        You'll have to start hitting garage sales and look for the old antenna rotors and controls so you don't have to run outside and spin the antenna.

      #14
      That is greatness. A simpler time, for sure. I’m hearing my dad’s whistle as I write this. (Although I’m really not writing it, am I?). It reminded me of something else we didn’t have in 50’ssmall-town Oklahoma— Mexican food. My wife is from Dallas, and I’m pretty sure the first Mexican food I ever ate was on a weekend she took me home with her when we were in school, probably 1966 or 67. I discovered El Chico. It’s been a happy life with both.

      Comment


      • SheilaAnn
        SheilaAnn commented
        Editing a comment
        Soonerpop I actually lived in Dallas (Garland, Richardson, Plano) for about 4 years. Back when the only thing in Plano was Southfork Ranch! Yum.... El Chico.

      #15
      Growing up in the 70’s and 80’s not much changed from the original list. My mom had paprika, but I only saw it used for a garnish on deviled eggs. Other than salt and pepper, only other thing I regularly saw her use was Larry’s. We did have the luxurious introduction of Kraft mac and cheese. However, most meals were protein, boiled potatoes, and veggies from on of those frozen blocks. We also had Doritos and Cheetos though and mom fried with vegetable oil or Crisco.

      I do remember the arrival of the Amana Radar Range to our house. After my parents tried cooking about everything in the dumb thing - usually more than one attempt, it settled into mostly a leftover reheater and frozen entree cooker.

      My dad made the strange sammies others mentioned like fried bologna, PB & dill pickle, PB & banana, fried spam, etc. I didn’t mind the PB & dill or when he sliced up ring bologna and fried it, Haven’t touched spam in 30+ years snd it’s been ages since I had a slice of Oscar Mayer sandwich bologna.

      Comment

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