Welcome!


This is a membership forum. As a guest, you can click around a bit. View 5 pages for free. If you would like to participate, please join.

[ Pitmaster Club Information | Join Now | Login | Contact Us ]

There are 4 page views remaining.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Help - my ribs didn't come out very good

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Help - my ribs didn't come out very good

    Hi all,

    This was my first use of the MAK 2-star with ribs (pellet smoker).

    I used the same ribs as always from Costco. Same rub. The main difference was the smoker (using the MAK vs. my prior electric vertical unit).

    The ribs may have been a bit overcooked - the meat pulled way back from the bones and once cut, the meat easily fell off the bones. I cooked them until 190F (two probes on two racks using the Thermo 2 channel unit), so it's believable. Not dry; fairly moist (could have been less done and more moist).

    Also, I never before noticed these "white-ish" pieces of what appears to be cartilage or gristle. Would they have melted if cooked to a higher temperature, or was it just perhaps a different cut of meat from what I'm used to?

    I spritzed once per hour, using a 2-2-1 method (I saw a lot of folks saying this was superior to the 3-2-1).

    I don't know what else to say but the Big Boss says sell the damn thing and go back to the old smoker!

    Any OTHER advice???

    #2
    The white cartilage probably means you had St Louis cut ribs. I don't wrap and I don't spritz. I just let them ride in the pellet pooper until they pass the bend test, then I'll apply some sauce and let that reduce somewhat and serve after a gentle cool down.

    Comment


      #3
      I don't see what you didnt like from the above. They weren't dry.... were they flavorful? Bark? What was the problem? Did you do the same spritzing on the old smoker or is that new?

      Comment


      • smokyYank
        smokyYank commented
        Editing a comment
        Hi Rick,

        The old smoker was electric and had a water pan so I didn't spritz.

      #4
      I to am puzzled as to what was wrong with the ribs. Sound pretty good to me. Can you clarify? I cook on a pellet smoker also and follow the same approach as above. They turn out terrific every time.

      Comment


      • smokyYank
        smokyYank commented
        Editing a comment
        Hi Jfrosty,

        Would you mind coming to NY and showing me? LOL

      #5
      No pics, no description of what you and The Boss did not like. What temp did you set for the MAK? Cooked on the main grates or top shelf ( I ask because the MAK does have a 20*-25* variance between the main grate level and the upper shelf). 2-2-1 means you wrapped after 2 hours, then unwrapped and sauced for another hour - is that correct?

      I guess we’re all looking for more data to maybe guide you as to what you expected versus what you got.

      Comment


      • smokyYank
        smokyYank commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks, GG

        I used top and bottom; two probes, only differed around 5 deg. I set the unit to 220, but it swung wildly, so adjusted a few times till my 3rd probe showed an average of about 220.

      #6
      I am assuming he was not a fan of the gristle and preferred more of a bite versus falling off the bone.

      The gristle could be simply a not ideal cut of meat.

      The lack of bite can be addressed via a shorter cook time. I don’t see temps mentioned but usually ribs are cooked between 225 and 250. You may want to try something like 2-1.5-1 and see if that is more to your taste.

      Comment


      • IFindZeroBadCooks
        IFindZeroBadCooks commented
        Editing a comment
        It is also really hard to get good temps on the thin ribs, so I try to use the bend test and look for the meat pulling back.

      • smokyYank
        smokyYank commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks, zc.

        Please describe the bend test? They were full racks and when I picked them up in the middle, they just about broke in half.

      • IFindZeroBadCooks
        IFindZeroBadCooks commented
        Editing a comment
        The bend test is where you pick up the meat, tilt it, and the bark should crack.

        Your ribs sound overcooked as they slid off the bone which is why I suggested the shorter cook time to start. However as glitchy noted in his new MAK thread, it can cook well off from set temp initially until it gets seasoned where it becomes dialed in.

      #7
      I'll 100% put my money on those ribs weren't exactly the same cuts he'd been used to. It's COVID time, theres a labor shortage due to people wanting to stay on unemployment, and that is probably one of many reasons the ribs were not up to par.

      The absolute second thing is you gotta learn your new smoker. Geez - you got a nice one. Take the time to experiment a bit and you'll be A-OK.

      Comment


      • smokyYank
        smokyYank commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks, morganijim. Good point.

      #8
      Keep a Log of your cook, all your cooks. Timestamp each entry.
      1. Plan your cook
      2. Cook your plan
      3. Appy PBR, Post BBQ Review. Note the +'s and -'s,
      4. enjoy BBQ and pair with "PBR"

      Long Live BBQ, and Happy grilling to you.

      Comment


      • smokyYank
        smokyYank commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks, luv. Thankfully I do keep a journal.

      #9
      Probably just a “meh” rack. Kinda obvious but worth repeating, meat is an organic thing...and no two animals will ever be exactly alike. As stated previously, the white bits were most likely cartilage. Other than trim it out, or “remove” while eating...not much can be done about that.

      FWIW, I don’t wrap...and I don’t spritz. (Seems I just saw that.)
      Oh, and St. Louis cut ribs are my “go to” style.

      The “done” temp is a matter of taste...and every cooker will achieve that in a slightly different way. Don’t give up on your new toy just yet.

      Comment


      • smokyYank
        smokyYank commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks, dog. I cooked to 195. Pork can be as low as 145 to kill the trichynosis, wondering if I should cook to a lower temp than 195? I cook my shoulder/butt to about 210 to make all the magic happen and it's fabulous - melts in your mouth.

      #10
      As I understand it, with a pellet smoker you get more smoke at lower temps. Should I shoot for 210 rather than 220-225?

      Comment


        #11
        What I think you should do is have a plan for your next cook. Something like this, which is how I do it. YMMV

        1. 24 hours before the cook - Trim and dry brine ribs
        2. 1 hour before the cook - set up smoker, bring up to temp
        3. 5 minutes before the cook - wet ribs with a bit of water and apply rub
        4. During cook - run smoker at 250F, only need a probe on the grates, ribs are too thin for a temp probe
        5. About the 4 hour mark, start checking ribs for “done” using bend test or toothpick probe test
        6. During the cook - no need to wrap or spritz (remember, this is my approach, your mileage may vary)
        7. When they pass the bend test, pull, wrap in butcher paper, hold in 170F oven for 30-45 minutes
        8. Slice, serve, enjoy

        Then, if they don’t come out to your liking, you can adjust your plan for next time.

        Also, I seriously never check the meat temp on ribs. It’s not of much value to do so. The bones distort the temps, the meat is done when it’s done, the bend test doesn’t fail me.

        You won’t go wrong if you follow my general plan or if you follow Meathead’s Last Meal Ribs

        Comment


          #12
          Also a few thoughts on your cook and why you may not have been happy

          1. Ribs sound overcooked. That is not about meat temp, it is about how long they cooked. The rib slab broke in half, which indicates quite overcooked. Some people like it this way, some do not.
          2. It’s the first time on a new cooker. You have to learn the cooker, it’s not going to be perfect first time out.
          3. Those ribs sounds like St Louis Cut spare ribs. If you are used to cooking back ribs, the experience will be different
          4. You were cooking to temp, which doesn’t really work with ribs.

          My two cents worth, for what that is worth

          Comment


          • Sweaty Paul
            Sweaty Paul commented
            Editing a comment
            +1 on this.

          #13
          You’ve gotten really good advice thus far. I just wanted to add. Learning your cooker is key, particularly via your cook log/diary/journal. Noting weather conditions is really helpful too. Also, cooking to temp should be a guide or cue to check for tenderness. It is NOT the final day. The meat is done when it is done. I’ve screwed up many a meal by taking it off thinking it was done (based on temp) when it actually needed more time. Consider every cut of meat will not have the same basic fat content at the one next to it, thus different cook times.

          Enjoy that nice cooker!

          Comment


          • Sweaty Paul
            Sweaty Paul commented
            Editing a comment
            +1 on this

          #14
          I see you've already had some good advice, but will second some of it.

          First - you should not need a water pan or need to spritz in a pellet smoker.

          Second - using the foil wrap in the 3-2-1 or 2-2-1 method is what led to the ribs being overcooked and falling apart like that. I would advise not wrapping next time, and seeing how you like them. If you feel they are not tender enough, only wrap for one hour. I quit wrapping my ribs a number of years ago, and am happier with the results. When you wrap, you are effectively braising the ribs in their own juices.

          Third - its hard to monitor ribs for temperature using a probe. I've never bothered doing it, and go by the bend test on spares or Saint Louis cut ribs. You really can't go by the bend test with thick loin back (baby back) ribs. With those, go by pull back from the ends of the bones and other signs.

          Finally, don't give up after just one cook. I am sure it took you a while to learn your old electric smoker, and how long to cook the ribs. You bought a top notch cooker there in the MAK, and you just need to take a little time to learn it. Ribs are something that in a way are easier, but also harder than pulled pork or brisket, mostly as it is hard to monitor them with a simple temperature probe and have a complete picture of doneness.
          Last edited by jfmorris; May 3, 2021, 09:06 AM.

          Comment


          • Sweaty Paul
            Sweaty Paul commented
            Editing a comment
            +1 on this

          #15
          smokyYank it is impossible to help someone with something they cooked, that they did like when they will not tell you what they did not like. From reading all your hits it seems to broil done to:

          The white-ish stuff was most likely siver skin. Some cuts of ribs this can and should be remove before cooking. Other cuts it can not be removed. Buyer beware.

          That point that you are using a pellet cooker for something else may suggest you are not happy about the amount of smoke on what you cooked. That is common with all pellet cookers. And there are ways around that.

          If you want us to help you need to provide the details we need to do this. Like what several have asked above. If you do not like how something turned out, tell us what you did not like.

          Comment

          Announcement

          Collapse
          No announcement yet.
          Working...
          X
          false
          0
          Guest
          500
          ["pitmaster-my-membership","login","join-pitmaster","lostpw","reset-password","special-offers","help","nojs","meat-ups","gifts","authaau-alpha","ebooklogin-start","alpha","start"]
          false
          false
          {"count":0,"link":"/forum/announcements/","debug":""}
          Yes
          Rubs Promo

          Spotlight

          These are not ads or paid placements. These are some of our favorite tools and toys.

          These are products we have tested, won our top awards, and are highly recommend. Click here to read how we test, about our medals, and what they mean.

          Use Our Links To Help Keep Us Alive

          A big part of this site is our unbiased equipment and product reviews. We love playing with toys and we have no problem calling them the way we see them. Some companies pay a finder’s fee if a reader clicks a link on AmazingRibs.com and buys a product. It has zero impact on our reviews, zero impact on the price you pay, and the sites never tell us what you bought, but it has a major impact on our ability to keep this site alive! So before you buy, please click our links. Here’s a link that takes you to a page on Amazon that has some of our favorite tools and toys: https://tinyurl.com/amazingribs


          Bring The Heat With Broil King Signet’s Dual Tube Burners

          3 burner gas grill

          The Broil King Signet 320 is a modestly priced, 3-burner gas grill that packs a lot of value and power under the hood. Broil King’s proprietary, dual-tube burners get hot fast and are able to achieve high, searing temps that rival most comparatively priced gas grills. The quality cast aluminum housing carries a Limited Lifetime Warranty.

          Click here to read ourcompletereview


          Our Favorite Backyard Smoker

          The amazing Karubecue is the most innovative smoker in the world. The quality of meat from this machine is astonishing. At its crux is a patented firebox that burns logs above the cooking chamber and sucks heat and extremely clean blue smoke into the thermostat controlled oven. It is our favorite smoker, period.
          Click here for our review of this superb smoker



          Surely you know somebody who loves outdoor cooking who deserves a gift for the holidays, birthday, anniversary, or just for being wonderful. There he is, right in the mirror! Here are our selections of best ideas, all Platinum or Gold Medalists, listed by price.

          Click here to see our list of Gold Medal Gifts


          The Pit Barrel Cooker May Be Too Easy


          The PBC has a rabid cult following for good reason. It is absolutely positively without a doubt the best bargain on a smoker in the world. Period. This baby will cook circles around the cheap offset sideways barrel smokers because temperature control is so much easier.

          Click here to read our detailed review and the raves from people who own them


          Masterbuilt MPS 340/G ThermoTemp XL Propane Smoker


          This is the first propane smoker with a thermostat, making this baby foolproof. Set ThermoTemp’s dial from 175° to 350°F and the thermostat inside will adjust the burner just like an indoor kitchen oven. All you need to do is add wood to the tray above the burner to start smokin’.

          Click here to read our detailed review


          Is This Superb Charcoal Grill A Kamado Killer?


          The PK-360, with 360 square inches of cooking space, this rust free, cast aluminum charcoal grill is durable and easy to use. Four-way venting means it’s easy to set up for two zone cooking with more control than single vent Kamado grills. It is beautifully designed, completely portable, and much easier to set up for 2-zone cooking than any round kamado.

          Click here to read our detailed review of the PK 360

          Click here to order directly and get an exclusive AmazingRibs.com deal


          Grilla Pellet Smoker proves good things come in small packages

          We always liked Grilla. The small 31.5″ x 29.5″ footprint makes it ideal for use where BBQ space is limited, as on a condo patio.
          Click here for our review on this unique smoker