Welcome!


This is a membership forum. As a guest, you can click around a bit. View 5 pages for free. If you would like to participate, please join.

[ Pitmaster Club Information | Join Now | Login | Contact Us ]

There are 4 page views remaining.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Best brisket I've made yet

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Best brisket I've made yet

    Best brisket I've ever eaten, or made.

    Snake River Farms Wagyu Black brisket. 14.6lber, pretrimmed. After trimming I'd guess it came in around ~10lbs.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMAG7895.jpg
Views:	91
Size:	195.9 KB
ID:	97860



    Here it is just as after I started trimming the fat cap side (down in this pic)

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMAG7899.jpg
Views:	67
Size:	165.8 KB
ID:	97861



    Trimmed the majority of the fat between the flat & point, but didn't remove it entirely although almost. Notice the grain running in different directions flat=left, point=right.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMAG7901.jpg
Views:	66
Size:	236.2 KB
ID:	97862





    So I'm not the best with a knife, I don't care. I tried to leave about 1/4 - 3/8" fat cap. I think I hit that mark for the most part.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMAG7903.jpg
Views:	84
Size:	269.5 KB
ID:	97863



    Dry brined about 20 hrs. Hefty dose of Kosher salt, little more than the recommended dry brine. (Worked out amazingly good).

    Finished brisket was 19" x 9". Fit the entire thing on the 22" kettle easily.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMAG7909.jpg
Views:	67
Size:	230.2 KB
ID:	97865



    Generous dose of Big Bad Beef Rub added to non-fat cap side, little more than what most might add. Meat not entirely visible underneath, intentionally. Fat cap got normal dose.

    Smoked with post oak. Fat cap up, since more heat is up than at the grate.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMAG7924.jpg
Views:	70
Size:	272.2 KB
ID:	97864



    Smoked 10 hrs to 180/190ish (point and flat were maybe 10-12 deg off from each other, the flat being warmer at 190ish) then wrapped in foil tightly no liquid.
    No butcher paper this time, long story. Taken to: flat 205, point 193 while wrapped. Let the kettle come down in temp to "power cambro" it.

    Let it power cambro for 2 hrs, 12hr total cook with hold. Meat was still upper 180s when pulled to slice.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMAG7706.jpg
Views:	79
Size:	123.6 KB
ID:	97866




    Sliced like butter.

    Left- flat. Right- point (rotated 1/4 turn counterclockwise, then sliced)

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMAG7708.jpg
Views:	78
Size:	146.6 KB
ID:	97868


    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMAG7711.jpg
Views:	70
Size:	337.4 KB
ID:	97871




    2 of my buddies who are BBQ aficionados, (although non-AR readers) said things like "this is how brisket is supposed to taste", and "I don't remember the last time I had 7 slices of anything, but that was fantastic". 3rd guy said he usually never even goes for seconds of anything but he went for thirds! Even my wife, who is as honest as can be with my Q (which I prefer) said everything was balanced well, the salt, spice and the smoke. I was pretty thrilled it turned out so good and I was able to provide such a nice meal to my friends & family.

    The slices were pullable, needed a light press of the fork to cut, and the fat was soft as butter.

    Sorry some of these pics aren't as clear as I hoped they'd be.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMAG7710.jpg
Views:	82
Size:	397.3 KB
ID:	97869


    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMAG7709.jpg
Views:	67
Size:	310.4 KB
ID:	97870
    Attached Files

    #2
    Looks awesome Huskee but I don't remember reading where Aaron Franklin cook his briskets on a kettle...

    Comment


    • DWCowles
      DWCowles commented
      Editing a comment
      Huskee you might be able to find some oak or red oak on Craigslist locally.

    • SmokinDTown
      SmokinDTown commented
      Editing a comment
      Move to Texas! Plenty of Post Oak there! Looks great! Well, it looks better than great, really.....and I'm still cookin' biscuits on my smoker.....

    • Huskee
      Huskee commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks SmokinDTown!

    #3
    Fantastic looking brisket! Makes me want to run out and buy one!

    Comment


    • Huskee
      Huskee commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks Doc!

    #4
    Amazing!

    Comment


    • Huskee
      Huskee commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks Jon!

    #5
    Makes me really hungry for brisket! That Wagyu must have cost a few bucks per pound. Great pics too!

    Comment


    • Huskee
      Huskee commented
      Editing a comment
      Yeah they're not cheap that's for sure. Roughly $10-11/lb. Cheaper per lb than grocery store steaks...but if you factor in all the trimming necessary with a brisket, the cost goes to about $16/lb or more.

    #6
    Well, THAT says a lot!!

    CONGRATULATIONS!!!! Job well done!

    Comment


    • Huskee
      Huskee commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you!

    #7
    Looks terrific! That makes me hungry, still have an hour left on my ribs...

    Comment


    • Huskee
      Huskee commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks John!

    • _John_
      _John_ commented
      Editing a comment
      Ribs were the best yet, but even with that I still would have rather had a great brisket.

    #8
    Looks really awesome Husk. I gotta try one of these SRF briskets some day. #thatsmokeringtho

    Comment


    • Huskee
      Huskee commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks John! I think the Wagyu brisket is a splurge item for this camper, hardly an everyday thing...but wow if you know how to cook one it cooks up SOOOO good.

    #9
    Looks awesome, I would love to try some wagyu meat sometime.

    Silly question perhaps: what is post oak? Is it a specific type of oak tree?

    Comment


    • Huskee
      Huskee commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks Henrik! The Post Oak is a small white oak, Quercus stellata to be exact (from a quick Google search), native to the Southeastern and South-central USA, from the Carolinas west to Kansas and down through central Texas. It's small size makes it ideal for making fence posts, hence the name post oak. I used to think it meant old fence posts, lol.

    • Henrik
      Henrik commented
      Editing a comment
      Cool, thanks!

    • Jimbobaya
      Jimbobaya commented
      Editing a comment
      I'm not sure sure where all it grows in the U.S. I'm from Texas. In central and north Texas what we are known for is post oak and brisket. Aaron Franklin (Franklin's BBQ - Austin), Justin Fontaine (Pecan Lodge - Dallas...ironic naming though) are known for cooking with Post Oak. Black's, Smitty's, Kreutz's, and City Market all known for post oak. East Texas you'll find most on Pecan. West Texas is Mesquite wood. But the bulk myself (not that I should be mentioned with the above) included cook on Post Oak. In your area it also might be called white oak.

    #10
    Awesome cook! Pics are great too. Need to post those on the site

    Comment


      #11
      Huskee, Love the cook and pics! And, #Bonus, your wife approved! That's great you have an objective taster in the house.

      OK, what did you find different about cooking the Black Wagyu?

      Comment


      • PaulstheRibList
        PaulstheRibList commented
        Editing a comment
        RockOn, Huskee!

        This learning and becoming competent at stuff is so fun!

      • gcdmd
        gcdmd commented
        Editing a comment
        Aaron mentioned on one of his videos, when asked what kind of beef he used, that he uses Angus. I assume that meant Certified Angus, which must be Choice or better, in keeping with Meathead's dictum.

      • Huskee
        Huskee commented
        Editing a comment
        gcdmd he says in other videos, or maybe his book- or both- that he uses only Prime, 'it costs more but it's worth it', to paraphrase him.

      #12
      OHHHHHHHH YEAH... Great Cook!

      Comment


      • Huskee
        Huskee commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks man!

      #13
      ontheranch I specifically asked for one from your ranch. I can only assume it was, since it was amazing! You do good work.

      Comment


      • Huskee
        Huskee commented
        Editing a comment
        ontheranch Oh, ok, so the Northwest beef ribeye filets I've been eating are yours...that's it!

      • ontheranch
        ontheranch commented
        Editing a comment
        Huskee, I need to clarify. I totally misspoke last time. We supply product to AB (Agri-Beef). SRF is a subsidiary of AB. It is ONLY wagyu and kurobuta pork. We do NOT do wagyu....most of our product goes to their DoubleRRanch brand which is also excellent. Our calves are usually fed out at El Oro Feeders in Moses Lake, WA. Sorry if I misled you.

        AB has a great web site...check out all their divisions and products. Anything from any of their subsidiaries is quality meat.

      • Huskee
        Huskee commented
        Editing a comment
        ontheranch I understood completely. From what I understand, what they market as "Northwest Beef" is the Double R brand, which for the last year or so is under the same umbrella as the main SRF website. I've purchased more NW/Double R beef than I have Wagyu. It is all excellent!

      #14
      that's awesome. inspirational.

      Comment


        #15
        Looks great huskee... Can't wait to try a brisket

        Comment

        Announcement

        Collapse
        No announcement yet.
        Working...
        X
        false
        0
        Guest
        500
        ["pitmaster-my-membership","login","join-pitmaster","lostpw","reset-password","special-offers","help","nojs","meat-ups","gifts","authaau-alpha","ebooklogin-start","alpha","start"]
        false
        false
        {"count":0,"link":"/forum/announcements/","debug":""}
        Yes
        Rubs Promo

        Spotlight

        These are not ads or paid placements. These are some of our favorite tools and toys.

        These are products we have tested, won our top awards, and are highly recommend. Click here to read how we test, about our medals, and what they mean.

        Use Our Links To Help Keep Us Alive

        A big part of this site is our unbiased equipment and product reviews. We love playing with toys and we have no problem calling them the way we see them. Some companies pay a finder’s fee if a reader clicks a link on AmazingRibs.com and buys a product. It has zero impact on our reviews, zero impact on the price you pay, and the sites never tell us what you bought, but it has a major impact on our ability to keep this site alive! So before you buy, please click our links. Here’s a link that takes you to a page on Amazon that has some of our favorite tools and toys: https://tinyurl.com/amazingribs


        Finally, A Great Portable Pellet Smoker

        Green Mountain Grills Trek smoker

        Green Mountain Grills Trek smoker

        Green Mountain’s portable Trek Smoker is one mean tailgating and picnic machine. But it’s also gaining popularity with people who want to add a small, set it and forget it pellet smoker to their backyard arsenal. And with their WiFi capabilities you can control and monitor Trek from your smart phone or laptop.

        Click here to read our detailed review and to order


        The Good-One Is A Superb Grill And A Superb Smoker All In One


        The Good-One Open Range is dramatically different from a traditional offset smoker. By placing the heat source behind and under the smokebox instead of off to the side, Open Range produces even temperature from left to right, something almost impossible to achieve with a standard barrel shaped offset.

        Click here to read ourcomplete review

         

        Comprehensive Temperature Magnet With 80+ Important Temps

        Amazingribs.com temperature magnet
        Winner of the National BBQ Association’s product of the year award. This 8.5″ x 11″ magnet contains more that 80 benchmark temperatures for meats (both USDA recommended temps as well as the temps chefs recommend), fats and oils, sugars, sous vide, eggs, collagens, wood combustion, breads, and more. Although it is not certified as all-weather, we have tested it outdoors in Chicago weather and it has not delaminated in three years, but there is minor fading.

        Click here to order.


        The Cool Kettle With The Hinged Hood We Always Wanted


        Napoleon’s 22″ Pro Cart Charcoal Kettle Grill puts a few spins on the familiar kettle design. In fact, the hinged lid with a handle on the front, spins in a rotary motion 180 degrees. It’s hard to beat a Weber kettle, but Napoleon holds its own and adds some unique features to make the 22″ Pro Cart a viable alternative.

        Click here for more about what makes this grill special


        Blackstone Rangetop Combo: Griddle And Deep Fryer In One


        The flat top does the burgers and the fryer does the fries. Use the griddle for bacon, eggs, grilled cheese, and so much more. And why deep fry indoors when you can avoid the smell and mess by doing it outside!

        Click here to read our detailed review and to order


        Masterbuilt MPS 340/G ThermoTemp XL Propane Smoker


        This is the first propane smoker with a thermostat, making this baby foolproof. Set ThermoTemp’s dial from 175° to 350°F and the thermostat inside will adjust the burner just like an indoor kitchen oven. All you need to do is add wood to the tray above the burner to start smokin’.

        Click here to read our detailed review


        The Efficiency Of A Kamado Plus The Flexibility Of The Slow ‘N Sear Insert

        kamado grill
        Built around SnS Grill’s patented Slow ‘N Sear charcoal kettle accessory, this 22-inch kamado is a premium ceramic grill that brings true 2-zone cooking to a kamado.

        Click here for our article on this exciting cooker