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Best brisket I've made yet

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  • Breadhead
    replied
    Wowser... That's a beautifully done brisket! Great pictures too.

    Leave a comment:


  • jrobertson50
    replied
    looks amazing. thanks for the writeup. never dry birned a brisket yet. will have to try now.

    Leave a comment:


  • Huskee
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks for the great compliment Dan!

  • Mosca
    replied
    Thanks for this topic reigniting. I ordered a SRF American Kobe brisket, and have much the same questions.

    The forum is the best place for immediate answers, but you can also find enduring answers at the recipe sits of Amazing Ribs. In fact Huskee just answered there, my very same questions about preparing, cutting, injecting, and timing. The advantage is that you don't have to do a search, just go to Meathead's brisket page. there you will find most FAQs answered for posterity!

    Leave a comment:


  • Danjohnston949
    replied
    Huskee, it lends credibility when the moderator can cook like that! Especially using a Weber Charcoal Grill, that everyone can afford, my hat's off to you! Dan

    Leave a comment:


  • Huskee
    replied
    Originally posted by flavorguy View Post
    First time poster here - I'll be attempting my first Wagyu brisket on Sunday.... and my first packer (I've only done HOF before) so a few quick questions:

    1) Did you inject, or was the fat content high enough to keep everything moist?
    2) What temp did you smoke at?
    3) Why did you take the brisket to a higher temp (>170'F ) before wrapping in foil?

    Thanks in advance!
    1) I don't inject, I think the Wagyu made it unnecessary. It was very most, even the flat slices
    2) I can't believe I didn't include that tidbit, good catch. Average smoking temp was 235 F.
    3) I wanted a good solid bark, one that wouldn't flake off when slicing. Too much time wrapped in foil when the bark hasn't been established well enough and my bark seems to be a little more pasty than I'd like. Per a recommendation from Jerod Broussard I began looking less at temp for wrapping, and more at bark for wrapping, which tends to be between 180-190 for me, or after the stall ends.

    Look forward to seeing your cook!

    Leave a comment:


  • flavorguy
    replied
    First time poster here - I'll be attempting my first Wagyu brisket on Sunday.... and my first packer (I've only done HOF before) so a few quick questions:

    1) Did you inject, or was the fat content high enough to keep everything moist?
    2) What temp did you smoke at?
    3) Why did you take the brisket to a higher temp (>170'F ) before wrapping in foil?

    Thanks in advance!

    Leave a comment:


  • Huskee
    commented on 's reply
    gcdmd he says in other videos, or maybe his book- or both- that he uses only Prime, 'it costs more but it's worth it', to paraphrase him.

  • _John_
    replied
    Looks awesome.

    Leave a comment:


  • gcdmd
    commented on 's reply
    Aaron mentioned on one of his videos, when asked what kind of beef he used, that he uses Angus. I assume that meant Certified Angus, which must be Choice or better, in keeping with Meathead's dictum.

  • airforcekixbutt
    replied
    Huskee, thanks for the reply. I will add this information to my notes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Huskee
    replied
    airforcekixbutt Well, that is an answer that can take a couple forms depending whom you ask. Most will tell you to inject the flat. I have never injected a piece of meat yet, and to be honest it's not something I really have any interest in doing. I have had flats get on the dry side (but still great and very edible) and to a certain degree it may be unavoidable when cooking a whole packer. Others will tell you that you should separate the point and flat and cook them separately since they have different timing and you can pull the flat off quicker to avoid the risk of overdrying it.

    In my case above I used a Wagyu brisket (higher than USDA Prime), expensive but very high quality and excellent marbling. I strongly feel this helped keep the flat moist, perhaps more than a standard cut. I also used a very generous dry brine, more than the typical recommendation. ALWAYS leave some fat cap on, and position it between the heat and the meat! I cooked fat cap up, since on my cooker the hotter air was above. This helps shield the meat from the heat some, a buffer. In other cookers, like a vertical cabinet style, you'd want the fat cap down most likely, since all the heat is then coming from below.

    Also, I have found that instead of separating the two muscles completely, I can shorten the gap of cook times between the two muscles by removing ALL of the fat layer between the flat & point, as you see in the pics above. This removes that insulation layer and helps the point cook a bit quicker, and therefore the flat doesn't cook as long.

    Leave a comment:


  • Huskee
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks!

  • airforcekixbutt
    replied
    Quick question on your beautiful brisket. I'm still doing my homework before I smoke my first brisket. If your going to slice the whole brisket and not make burnt ends, how do you cook the whole brisket and not over cook the flat end and properly cook the point end?

    Leave a comment:


  • HorseDoctor
    replied
    Oh my... that there is a brisket to aspire to!!! Great pix to boot I could almost taste it just looking at it! Well done sir!!!

    Leave a comment:

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