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Tricks to make select grade tri tip more tender

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    Tricks to make select grade tri tip more tender

    Well, I didn't realize what I did until I was walking from the store to my car. I got a bunch of tri tip and noticed on the package that it was select grade. Must have been why it was cheaper lol. So now I've got 20 lbs (un-trimmed) of select tri tip.

    Don't get me wrong, I'm sure I can make it good as I've gotten a few of these packages before. It's just now that I'm noticing the grade of the meat.

    So I plan on dry brining it for at least 24 hours to help tenderize it. Is there anything else I should do? Do you recommend doing anything with the fat like making some tallow and maybe drizzling that on the finished product like I've been seeing done a lot lately with brisket? Should I use a manual meat tenderizer on it?

    anyways, any tips and tricks are greatly appreciated!

    TIA

    #2
    I would front sear it, then wrap and bring it to finish temp slowly. You can also inject it with some beef broth, but honestly with that cut it should still be good even without injecting it. You could also use some tallow, but tritip isn't porous like brisket so I don't think it will do much other than mouth feel, I think you'd be better off with a little butter. Butter won't run straight off the meat like liquid tallow would.

    Comment


    • jitsntricks
      jitsntricks commented
      Editing a comment
      I did think about the butter thing. Drizzle some butter on it after I slice into it? I have some compound butter I could use for that!

      Thanks for the tips!

    • LA Pork Butt
      LA Pork Butt commented
      Editing a comment
      I would second that approach.

    #3
    Pray, maybe? Inject with something, maybe? Or just buy the tee shirt ......

    Comment


      #4
      I normally cook Choice Tri-Tip and it comes out great. I think you will be okay with Select, also.
      • Dry brine for 24 hours
      • Cook reverse sear and bring that meat up to a good internal temp slowly.
      • Slice against the grain .... very important.
      • I think I would gather all the juices during carving, reheat them, and then pour over the sliced meat right as I served

      Here's a very good video on slicing Tri-Tip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNFVnnXyyYo

      Comment


        #5
        Slice as thin as possible across the grain.

        Comment


          #6
          Jaccard,
          How To Use 48 Blade Jaccard Original Meat Tenderizer - Bing video
          Last edited by bbqLuv; July 8, 2021, 02:53 PM.

          Comment


          • rodkeary
            rodkeary commented
            Editing a comment
            Not necessary if you buy your tri tips at Costco☹️

          #7
          Sous Vide.

          Comment


          • rodkeary
            rodkeary commented
            Editing a comment
            Yup! Try tip is the perfect protein for the SV.

          • Troutman
            Troutman commented
            Editing a comment
            You be talkin' about Sue again? How do you do?

          • RichieB
            RichieB commented
            Editing a comment
            my thought exactly. dry brine 24 hours bath for 48 hours, shock and sear.

          #8
          My experiences with tri tips have left me frustrated on more than one occasion. I was able, through diligence and perseverance , to make a wagyu one tough. That takes a special talent. My sons both SV theirs, I’d probably go with Troutman and beat it with a mallet. For me 60 days of wet aging vastly improves select briskets, but I haves no idea the effect it would have on a tri tip.

          Comment


            #9
            I SV the stuff to tenderize, then sear it quickly.

            I usually go ~ 48 or so hours at 132F.

            Comment


              #10
              I agree on sous vide. Joule says 20 hours at 140 but they seem conservative per this thread.

              Comment


                #11
                Originally posted by Jerod Broussard View Post
                Sous Vide.
                +1. I normally SV choice or prime grade for 6-8 hours. For select I would go 12-24 hours, then sear.

                Comment


                  #12
                  Something to remember here - considering the trip-tip cut it itself and how it gained recognition - it was a cheap, leftover cut for the po' folk ranch hands and it was mostly never Choice or Prime. That said - it's all in the preparation. I personally would never smoke a tri-tip, but that's just me. I will instead grill it over some hot red oak on my santa maria-style grill attachment on my Weber and let it absorb the smoke this way. season with salt and pepper and maybe some garlic granules or powder if you're feeling crazy. Sear it hot and let it bark up a lot then raise it up over the fire so the flames can still just kiss it and pull when you've hit your desired IT.
                  I've had some great, great meals cooking inexpensive cuts of meat. is it better? not always. But usually it cuts the mustard just fine. I also try not to get hung up on a need for high-end cuts as I can't always afford to eat high-end. But that's probably how you ended up with Select beef this time around so I may be preaching to the choir. anyhow, cook it right and it will taste good. just my 2 cents.

                  Comment


                  • ecowper
                    ecowper commented
                    Editing a comment
                    jitsntricks I cook choice Tri-Tip at 250F until it probes at 125F internal. I think on a select, I'd do it even lower, like 225F until I got to 125F, or so.

                    Troutman the traditional Santa Maria way to do it is over open fire, not too hot, until the cook feels like it's done. I've modified that on the Hasty-Bake to use a reverse sear type approach. it's as good an outcome as any Tri-Tip I ever had in Santa Maria

                  • jitsntricks
                    jitsntricks commented
                    Editing a comment
                    ecowper That's typically what I do, 250 until about 125 IT then 2x2 min sear on each side after on a gas grill.

                    I'm going to cut it pretty thin with my brisket knife. These will be for eating and/or tacos which should be good.

                  • ecowper
                    ecowper commented
                    Editing a comment
                    jitsntricks sliced thin, would make for great steak sammiches, too

                  #13
                  I sous vide for 6.5 hours at 132*. I rub with a Santa Maria rub the night before for sort of a dry brine. - there are a number here in SoCal at the local markets. Remove from SV, dry very thoroughly, season with a bit more Santa Maria rub, and then sear. I use my gasser’s IR sear burner, but super hot cast iron works very well. Very, very tender, medium rare, chimichurri on the side (or a sauce of your preference). Excellent and would do well for Select grade.
                  Last edited by GolfGeezer; July 8, 2021, 08:52 PM.

                  Comment


                    #14
                    As a California native I’ve cooked countless tri-tip. There are two keys to a good tri-tip:
                    1) Do not overcook it. Medium rare, max; I do mine to no more than 130°F internal. I prefer a reverse sear, but front sear is traditional Santa Maria-style. While talking about tradition…salt, pepper, and garlic only on your rub.
                    2) Slice it against the grain. If not cut perfectly against the grain your jaw will be in pain trying to chew it. Cut properly it will be tender and delicious.
                    Last edited by Santamarina; July 9, 2021, 01:34 AM.

                    Comment


                    • jitsntricks
                      jitsntricks commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Nice, thanks for the tip!

                    • ecowper
                      ecowper commented
                      Editing a comment
                      jitsntricks I posted a video that shows how to slice Tri-Tip up above. Everything else Santamarina is saying, I totally agree with. I take mine to 125F internal in the slow indirect cook, then I sear about 2 minutes per side and pull it. That gives me 130F, roughly, and with carry over I end up at 135-140. Which is perfect, to me.

                    #15
                    Also... what's the actual marbling like?

                    Comment


                    • jitsntricks
                      jitsntricks commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Not all that great. I've gotten multiple packages of this stuff and all have turned out good. Just wondering if there's any extra tips to give it that extra goodness. I think I'm going to drizzle some compound butter on it after I slice it.

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