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New Mexican Carne Adovada

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    New Mexican Carne Adovada

    Growing up as a kid, I was exposed to New Mexican food early on. Not because I grew up in Albuquerque, New Mexico – where it seemed most restaurants were mom and pop New Mexican food restaurants – but because I grew up watching my grandmother and grandfather run one of these mom and pop restaurants.

    In the early 1980s, my grandparents took over a family run New Mexican food restaurant called "Barela’s New Mexican Food." Prior to my grandparents, it was ran by my grandfathers sister for a number of years. And it was at this time that I was introduced to New Mexican food. It was a small, whole in the wall, walk up to a counter and order off a menu posted on the wall above the cashier stand. They offered a small selection of food, but the one thing they were known for was the red chile and menudo. Every Wednesday night, my parents would take my sister and I to dinner here, which was great because not only did I get to see my grandparents, but I got to eat some amazing food too! Many times, I’d get to "help" out in the kitchen on the weekends, which meant doing some dishes here and there, but really, getting to spend some time with them. After a number of years, the restaurant was too much for them to handle and the ended up closing the doors. But, that didn’t mean the tradition of the Barela’s New Mexican Food wouldn’t be passed on.

    Since I have been married, which was in 2000 and I remember my grandmother teaching me how to make Carne Adovada and Posole, it has become a tradition for my grandmother to stay with my family and I during the Christmas holiday. We pick her up the day before Christmas Eve and it’s a time to watch some movies and play a few games, and best of all, cook up some amazing Carne Adovada and Posole for the entire family for our Christmas Eve gathering. So, I hope you are able to enjoy a bowl of Carne Adovada and taste the love that I’ve come to know from this simple yet amazing dish that my family has come to love as well.

    Enjoy - Jeremy


    New Mexican Carne Adovada

    Course – Breakfast, Lunch or Dinner
    Cuisine – New Mexican
    Makes – 20 servings, 8qt pot

    Takes – 20 minutes prep, 2-3 hours cooking time

    Special tools


    I use a stew pot for this but a Dutch oven will work fine. Also need a good blender to blend up the chile pods.

    Ingredients

    - 4lbs bone-in or boneless pork butt – cubed to bite size. If using bone-in, cut around bone and reserve for cook.
    - 16oz bag of dried New Mexico red chile pods *see photo below of what I have used, or similar to (you can use dried chile powder, however I don’t know the conversion needed for this. It will need to be a decent amount to make a thick base)
    - 6 Tbs of minced garlic – can be fresh or pre-minced
    - 4 Tbs Beef base or 4 beef bouillon cubes, whichever you prefer
    - water to add to chile pods to blend
    - 1-2 Tbs oil, if needed to brown cubed pork butt
    - salt, reserved for once red chile and pork have started to cook down

    Method
    1. Remove stems and seeds from red chile pods and allow submerse in warm water for 15 minutes or so.
    2. Take pork butt and cut into 1.5” chunks. If you have pieces of stringy fat, cut off and throw away. Warm stock pot and if you are doing to use oil, add now and get to a shimmer. Add pork and garlic and begin to brown pork until no pink shows on exterior. If needed, brown the pork in batches to get better browning, removing and repeating with each batch. Once each batch is browned, add all to pot.
    3. While pork is browning, take a portion of chile pods and add to a blender to almost full. Add water so that blender is about 1/3-1/2 full and begin to blend, moving through each step of the blender so that you end with purée. You want to make this as smooth as possible, with no chile pods visible in purée. The blended chile pods should be somewhat thick but still loose enough to pour out. Pour first batch into pot of browned pork. Repeat blending of red chile pods - *NOTE - A 16oz bag will allow you to make about 1.5-2 blenders full of chile.
    4. Add beef base or bouillon cubes
    5. With your 1.5-2 blenders full of red chile, you want to make sure your pork is fully covered and bring to a simmer.
    6. Once simmering, turn heat so that you maintain a low simmer and allow pork to cook down so that it’s just about melt in your mouth tender. This will also allow for the bitterness of the red chile to cook out. I usually allow for 2-3 hours of a slow simmer, which will bring a sheen to the top of the red chile.
    7. As the red chile warms, taste and salt to your liking at this point. Salt is going to enhance the flavor of the red chile.
    Serve
    Carne Adovada is so versatile, eat as a bowl of Carne Adovada with a flour tortilla on the side. Warm up a tamale and serve as a meal together. Make up a Carne Adovada burrito, filled and the topped with a little more chile and melted shredded cheddar cheese. Or, if you are really adventurous, make up a batch of sopapillas (fried dough) and slice open half of the sopapilla and stuff with Carne Adovada and top with melted shredded cheddar cheese. And that was just for lunch or dinner! If you are like me, and want the best Huevos Rancheros, make up your preferred Huevos Rancheros with eggs and potatoes over corn or flour tortillas and smother with the goodness that Carne Adovada offers.



    Click image for larger version  Name:	762EFC18-32C6-48E5-B20F-237E2B4A7063.jpeg Views:	6 Size:	4.09 MB ID:	1149217


    Click image for larger version  Name:	E480B82C-6D2A-44FA-BFFC-D1939B631123.jpeg Views:	6 Size:	2.66 MB ID:	1149215


    In addition to the above meals, you can make this Carne Adovada into Posole, using hominy.


    New Mexican Posole

    Ingredients

    - Carne Adovada, amount to be determined by your taste
    -
    One bag of frozen hominy. *see photo below for what I use. Fresh hominy can be used as well. I just use frozen as it’s a bit easier.
    - Water to cover hominy

    Method
    1. Prepare hominy based on cooking directions on packaging. One key that not all packages state, ENSURE you remove all the lime preservative from the hominy or your posole will be ruined! With frozen hominy, a good washing over water for about 3 minutes will get this removed.
    2. Once washed, put in a stock pot and cover with water by 1-2”.
    3. Bring water to a boil and turn heat down so that you maintain a soft rolling boil and allow hominy to cook until it "pops". It will look a little like popcorn, not completely, but the hominy will be tender if you try a piece. Time can be about 45-60 minutes.
    4. Once you have hominy cooked, add in ladles of Carne Adovada. You want to keep a soup consistency here, so add in enough to bring in the flavor of red chile and allow to continue to cook at a simmer to fully bring out the Posole flavor, another 45-60 minutes.

    Serve

    Serve in a bowl with a flour tortilla on the side or a few saltine crackers. You can add a bit of diced onion and cilantro if you choose, but New Mexican style Posole is served with that – at least in the areas I’ve been in.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	B968E869-BC2C-4C92-AFDC-3CBC89CE2183.jpeg Views:	6 Size:	2.85 MB ID:	1149216

    ​
    *Bag of Bueno Foods dried red chile pods

    Click image for larger version  Name:	81AE1142-1705-454E-8F7D-57544C79B645.jpeg Views:	6 Size:	289.9 KB ID:	1149214
    ​
    *Bag of Bueno Foods frozen hominy

    Click image for larger version  Name:	A6A46ACE-E030-4220-98CC-FEA28A51AA3A.jpeg Views:	6 Size:	72.1 KB ID:	1149213
    ​
    Last edited by barelfly; December 31, 2022, 08:38 AM.

    #2
    barelfly Thanks for sharing. Man, that looks so good! I might do that this weekend. That breakfast picture with the eggs on top, I’m drooling.

    Comment


    • barelfly
      barelfly commented
      Editing a comment
      Huevos Rancheros are breakfast, lunch and dinner! You can add some meat if you would like, bacon or sausage, but since the pork is in the carne adovada, I don’t add any here. I have a green chile recipe on the board as well that you can use in the same way.

    • barelfly
      barelfly commented
      Editing a comment
      https://pitmaster.amazingribs.com/fo...een-chile-stew

      Not sure if you have read through this green chile post or not. I don’t know if I could choose a favorite of these two, both are amazing and work well for so many things. But Huevos Rancheros for both are top notch!

    • Clark
      Clark commented
      Editing a comment
      Panhead John You're always drooling!

    #3
    Outta the park, Jeremy!!

    Comment


    • barelfly
      barelfly commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you Mike - glad you were able to make this over the weekend!

    #4
    Thanks so much. Can’t wait to try this.

    Comment


    • barelfly
      barelfly commented
      Editing a comment
      Any time! Hope you enjoy!

    #5
    Well done sir, very Troutman like in history and comprehension. Poodle is on my list for the stew series, will take a look at your recipe when the time comes.

    Comment


    • Panhead John
      Panhead John commented
      Editing a comment
      Well, y’all can use poodle all ya want….but nothing beats duck billed platypus.

    • barelfly
      barelfly commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you Troutman!

    • 58limited
      58limited commented
      Editing a comment
      "But hey I do have two poodles……"

      Folks, beware of a future post where only one is mentioned....

    #6
    Jeremy, do you know if there are any other names beside 'red chiles'? ie, are these dried anchos, poblanos, etc? I don't recognize the bag you are able to purchase in NM.
    Thanks
    Daniel

    Comment


    • barelfly
      barelfly commented
      Editing a comment
      Continued Panhead John Dr. Pepper

      But, when I have sent my last two Secret Santa gifts, I have purchased from Chile Traditions, a local shop in my town that has been around forever - or check Amazon, as they carry the specific brand I posted above as well. If you guys can’t find it, let me know and I’ll help out and ship for you
      Last edited by barelfly; December 26, 2021, 11:11 PM.

    • Troutman
      Troutman commented
      Editing a comment
      For the most part, Anaheims and Hatch mild peppers seem to be interchangeable in my recipes. Hatch are seasonal here where Anaheims seem to show up year round. That’s why I don’t go out of my way to source Hatch.

    • gcdmd
      gcdmd commented
      Editing a comment
      58limited
      Just to add to your comment, the NM chili powder is usually in the Bolnar's Fiesta seasoning section.

    #7
    I just put this in a comment to PJ, but there are many online vendors for getting real-deal NM chile.

    https://madeinnewmexico.com/collecti...xico-red-chile

    https://www.hatch-green-chile.com/

    There are others to explore online too, just google up "new mexico red chile online".

    Chile grown in New Mexico is absolutely unique in their flavors. The combination of soil chemistry, water composition, elevation, low humidity, results in something you just don't get anywhere else. So you can't just swap in any old available chile. It's not very expensive to order from places like these, especially when getting dried products like red chile powder (makes it much easier to make the adovada sauce), and so very worth it. (I lived in ABQ for 8 years and am totally addicted, and keep myself supplied with my fix on a constant basis. Total junkie.)

    Comment


    • barelfly
      barelfly commented
      Editing a comment
      Dr. Pepper - usually, the medium isn’t bad. Mild is mild. Hot…well. Hahah! But, that said, sometimes even the mild can have a bite. Many restaurants will tell you their red chile is hotter than the green. And, I usually use Medium. I don’t have any of the ingredients in the house since I just made, so I had to grab a few stock photos and didn’t realize I grabbed hot

      Panhead John - just go with the dried chile pods!

    • Jim White
      Jim White commented
      Editing a comment
      Okay, Dr. Pepper, since we're going there, Daniel, I will offer that taking probiotics before a meal that's really spicy takes care of any problems of that sort for me. I take Culturelle brand. One tablet 2-3 times a week, but then take one for sure the day such a meal is planned. Life-changing.

    • PBCDad
      PBCDad commented
      Editing a comment
      This answered my question too about if the dish was spicy or not. I love a little spice but the wife and kids can't handle any more than a hint of spiciness. I'll run the idea of this dish using mild peppers by my wife

    #8
    …..already answered while I was typing
    Last edited by IFindZeroBadCooks; December 26, 2021, 06:10 PM.

    Comment


      #9
      Originally posted by barelfly View Post
      Growing up as a kid, I was exposed to New Mexican food early on. Not because I grew up in Albuquerque, New Mexico – where it seemed most restaurants were mom and pop New Mexican food restaurants – but because I grew up watching my grandmother and grandfather run one of these mom and pop restaurants.

      In the early 1980s, my grandparents took over a family run New Mexican food restaurant called "Barela’s New Mexican Food." Prior to my grandparents, it was ran by my grandfathers sister for a number of years. And it was at this time that I was introduced to New Mexican food. It was a small, whole in the wall, walk up to a counter and order off a menu posted on the wall above the cashier stand. They offered a small selection of food, but the one thing they were known for was the red chile and menudo. Every Wednesday night, my parents would take my sister and I to dinner here, which was great because not only did I get to see my grandparents, but I got to eat some amazing food too! Many times, I’d get to "help" out in the kitchen on the weekends, which meant doing some dishes here and there, but really, getting to spend some time with them. After a number of years, the restaurant was too much for them to handle and the ended up closing the doors. But, that didn’t mean the tradition of the Barela’s New Mexican Food wouldn’t be passed on.

      Since I have been married, which was in 2000 and I remember my grandmother teaching me how to make Carne Adovada and Posole, it has become a tradition for my grandmother to stay with my family and I during the Christmas holiday. We pick her up the day before Christmas Eve and it’s a time to watch some movies and play a few games, and best of all, cook up some amazing Carne Adovada and Posole for the entire family for our Christmas Eve gathering. So, I hope you are able to enjoy a bowl of Carne Adovada and taste the love that I’ve come to know from this simple yet amazing dish that my family has come to love as well.

      Enjoy - Jeremy


      New Mexican Carne Adovada

      Course – Breakfast, Lunch or Dinner
      Cuisine – New Mexican
      Makes – 20 servings, 8qt pot

      Takes – 20 minutes prep, 2-3 hours cooking time

      Special tools


      I use a stew pot for this but a Dutch oven will work fine. Also need a good blender to blend up the chile pods.

      Ingredients

      - 4lbs bone-in or boneless pork butt – cubed to bite size. If using bone-in, cut around bone and reserve for cook.
      - 16oz bag of dried New Mexico red chile pods *see photo below of what I have used, or similar to (you can use dried chile powder, however I don’t know the conversion needed for this. It will need to be a decent amount to make a thick base)
      - 6 tbs of minced garlic – can be fresh or pre-minced
      - 4 tbs Beef base or 4 beef bouillon cubes, whichever you prefer
      - water to add to chile pods to blend
      - 1-2 tbs oil, if needed to brown cubed pork butt
      - salt, reserved for once red chile and pork have started to cook down

      Method
      1. Remove stems and seeds from red chile pods and allow submerse in warm water for 15 minutes or so.
      2. Take pork butt and cut into 1.5” chunks. If you have pieces of stringy fat, cut off and throw away. Warm stock pot and if you are doing to use oil, add now and get to a shimmer. Add pork and garlic and begin to brown pork until no pink shows on exterior. If needed, brown the pork in batches to get better browning, removing and repeating with each batch. Once each batch is browned, add all to pot.
      3. While pork is browning, take a portion of chile pods and add to a blender to almost full. Add water so that blender is about 1/3-1/2 full and begin to blend, moving through each step of the blender so that you end with purée. You want to make this as smooth as possible, with no chile pods visible in purée. The blended chile pods should be somewhat thick but still loose enough to pour out. Pour first batch into pot of browned pork. Repeat blending of red chile pods - *NOTE - A 16oz bag will allow you to make about 1.5-2 blenders full of chile.
      4. Add beef base or bouillon cubes
      5. With your 1.5-2 blenders full of red chile, you want to make sure your pork is fully covered and bring to a simmer.
      6. Once simmering, turn heat so that you maintain a low simmer and allow pork to cook down so that it’s just about melt in your mouth tender. This will also allow for the bitterness of the red chile to cook out. I usually allow for 2-3 hours of a slow simmer, which will bring a sheen to the top of the red chile.
      7. As the red chile warms, taste and salt to your liking at this point. Salt is going to enhance the flavor of the red chile.
      Serve
      Carne Adovada is so versatile, eat as a bowl of Carne Adovada with a flour tortilla on the side. Warm up a tamale and serve as a meal together. Make up a Carne Adovada burrito, filled and the topped with a little more chile and melted shredded cheddar cheese. Or, if you are really adventurous, make up a batch of sopapillas (fried dough) and slice open half of the sopapilla and stuff with Carne Adovada and top with melted shredded cheddar cheese. And that was just for lunch or dinner! If you are like me, and want the best Huevos Rancheros, make up your preferred Huevos Rancheros with eggs and potatoes over corn or flour tortillas and smother with the goodness that Carne Adovada offers.



      Click image for larger version Name:	762EFC18-32C6-48E5-B20F-237E2B4A7063.jpeg Views:	6 Size:	4.09 MB ID:	1149217


      Click image for larger version Name:	E480B82C-6D2A-44FA-BFFC-D1939B631123.jpeg Views:	6 Size:	2.66 MB ID:	1149215


      In addition to the above meals, you can make this Carne Adovada into Posole, using hominy.


      New Mexican Posole

      Ingredients

      - Carne Adovada, amount to be determined by your taste
      -
      One bag of frozen hominy. *see photo below for what I use. Fresh hominy can be used as well. I just use frozen as it’s a bit easier.
      - Water to cover hominy

      Method
      1. Prepare hominy based on cooking directions on packaging. One key that not all packages state, ENSURE you remove all the lime preservative from the hominy or your posole will be ruined! With frozen hominy, a good washing over water for about 3 minutes will get this removed.
      2. Once washed, put in a stock pot and cover with water by 1-2”.
      3. Bring water to a boil and turn heat down so that you maintain a soft rolling boil and allow hominy to cook until it "pops". It will look a little like popcorn, not completely, but the hominy will be tender if you try a piece. Time can be about 45-60 minutes.
      4. Once you have hominy cooked, add in ladles of Carne Adovada. You want to keep a soup consistency here, so add in enough to bring in the flavor of red chile and allow to continue to cook at a simmer to fully bring out the Posole flavor, another 45-60 minutes.

      Serve

      Serve in a bowl with a flour tortilla on the side or a few saltine crackers. You can add a bit of diced onion and cilantro if you choose, but New Mexican style Posole is served with that – at least in the areas I’ve been in.

      Click image for larger version Name:	B968E869-BC2C-4C92-AFDC-3CBC89CE2183.jpeg Views:	6 Size:	2.85 MB ID:	1149216

      ​
      *Bag of Bueno Foods dried red chile pods

      Click image for larger version Name:	81AE1142-1705-454E-8F7D-57544C79B645.jpeg Views:	6 Size:	289.9 KB ID:	1149214
      ​
      *Bag of Bueno Foods frozen hominy

      Click image for larger version Name:	A6A46ACE-E030-4220-98CC-FEA28A51AA3A.jpeg Views:	6 Size:	72.1 KB ID:	1149213
      ​
      Thanks for writing this up. Sounds amazing.

      Comment


      • Panhead John
        Panhead John commented
        Editing a comment
        You could just comment after it.

      #10
      Is this a recipe where roasting the chiles before re-hydrating could boost the flavor profile? I did this when I made my hot sauces but don’t know if it is a good idea here.

      Comment


      • IFindZeroBadCooks
        IFindZeroBadCooks commented
        Editing a comment
        Skip rehydrate? Hmmmm. I will have to see what I have and look over my SS stash again. 😁

      • barelfly
        barelfly commented
        Editing a comment
        You could try it, I have not done so for Carne Adovada, but I have when I have made other types of chiles in other recipes. A quick hit on the cast iron then a soak.

      • Troutman
        Troutman commented
        Editing a comment
        I take and boil some chicken stock, let it cool then soak the chilis about 20 minutes or so. I pop them in the blender with a little of the soaking liquid and spin away. You can also roast briefly then pop into the blender with some liquid then spin.

      #11
      This is going on the list …. Thank you!!!

      Comment


        #12
        If you can get the kind of pods Jeremy is talking about, they'll have already been roasted. Ditto if you get the red chile powder and use that. We've roasted green chiles but just get the powder for the red, don't have the bandwidth for the full monty

        Comment


        • IFindZeroBadCooks
          IFindZeroBadCooks commented
          Editing a comment
          Makes sense. I will have to see what kind I have and plan accordingly.

        • barelfly
          barelfly commented
          Editing a comment
          No - these are not roasted in the way you are thinking. They are dried red chiles. If they were roasted, as you mention for the green chiles, they wouldn’t be sold dried like this and you would have to bag and freeze to hold.

          You can get roasted red chile, but that is fresh red chile that is then usually chopped and sold frozen (which is another way you could make the dish).
          Last edited by barelfly; December 26, 2021, 11:10 PM.

        • DaveD
          DaveD commented
          Editing a comment
          Oops, I misunderstood the question. Nevermind! Move along, nothing to see here.

        #13
        I have a special place on my palate for Posole, as it was one of the first dishes my now-wife made that blew my mind. Definitely going to try to figure out how to get her to make this for me too! Thanks!

        Comment


          #14
          Thanks for the great sounding recipe for New Mexican Carne Adovada. On my list to try.
          I have my own recipe for Pozole that I very much enjoy, But, your is so much simpler I my try it.
          Last edited by ofelles; December 26, 2021, 07:48 PM.

          Comment


          • barelfly
            barelfly commented
            Editing a comment
            Thanks for the comments. I actually read through your recipe today and it looks wonderful! And between the two, it shows how cultures have different takes on food. This is a Northern New Mexico style posole, at least from what I have experienced over the many New Mexican food restaurants I’ve visited.

            I would like to make your recipe some time though! I love experience the nuances that the various spices bring.

          #15
          I became mildly obsessed with this recipe when you shared it. When I saw dried New Mexico chiles at my local Fresh Thyme store, it was settled (they carry Badia brand...hopefully similar and authentic enough?). I made it tonight and it was just incredible - we just made tacos out of it but I can't wait to see how else to eat this stuff. Thank you for sharing!

          Comment


          • barelfly
            barelfly commented
            Editing a comment
            Love it! So glad you enjoyed the dish! And, as for brand?? I’ve tried a number of brands and really haven’t noticed a difference. So I’m sure Badia is great!

            Next up for you - Huevos Rancheros - a few corn tortillas, fried potatoes or hash browns, pinto beans if you want, and then eggs cooked to your liking smothered with carne adovada! You will love this dish as well!

            Thank you again for sharing your experience!

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