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Beware Of The Marketers

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  • MeatMonster
    Club Member
    • Mar 2017
    • 606
    • Ellon, Aberdeenshire
    • I love beer, BBQ and rugby, just don't make me choose between them!

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    #46
    As always worth reading and food for thought.

    Comment

    • ComfortablyNumb
      Club Member
      • May 2017
      • 2547
      • Northeast Washington
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      #47
      Originally posted by Willy View Post
      ComfortablyNumb To be clear, no, I don't believe the certification itself is a scam per se. I do believe organic supporters claiming organic produce is superior to conventional produce is a scam. The article you linked to says that as well. Like you, if I was a grower, I would not try to get OG certified.

      We are in full agreement on the expense and often silly, non-results oriented regulations for organic ag, as well as the emptiness of the word "natural". I too chuckle at the term "free range". Because of the poor treatment of chickens, we used to buy eggs at the FM. In a few years the price has gone from $3--$3.50 a dozen to $6 a dozen. I now buy eggs at the grocery store.

      I also agree with, and admire you for, your first sentences regarding treatment of and discussions with customers. I worked a FM for several years, sitting under a canopy and offering advice as a Master Gardener associated with the local County Extension Office. A couple of vendors confided in me over the years about some of their practices that weren't "kosher"--LOL. The fellow who used cotton defoliant as an herbicide topped the list. Not sure how even got hold of it. BTW, the use of the word "master" in the title Master Gardener is pretty much just blowing smoke up the skirts of unpaid volunteers. That said, I did enjoy the program and I learned a lot.

      A final FM irony. One local FM vendor grows his lettuces and greens hydroponically, which means, of course, not organically, yet he does a good business at our FM. I'm fine with hydroponics; it just seems odd that a generally organic crowd accepts it.

      If you don't mind my asking, what led to your departure from the FM?
      Organic certification and the claims of safer and more nutritional food go hand in hand. And my personal experience of selling points being more money and lack of transparency along with the need for fear marketing as expressed in the article you reference, convince me it is a scam. Perhaps you need some more nudging, check this out. However, it is not without irony, most organic proponents are anti-corporate, however who owns organic?

      'Natural' currently means nothing because it has yet to be coopted. However all it will take is an enterprising marketing group or a fed up regulatory agency to change that. 'Free range' is just a joke, as is all the terms used in marketing eggs, such as 'cage free' and 'vegetarian fed'. Too bad you're not my neighbour, I sold my eggs from chickens who roamed ten fenced in acres eating whatever they pleased for $2.00 a dozen. Customers insisted I wasn't charging enough so they raised my rates to $2.50 and eventually $3.00 a dozen.

      What earns your admiration resulted in ire from my peers. To them 'fresh, local, and grown naturally' were to suffice. Frankly, I feel that farming should not be a profession, rather an obligation. We should all be growing food. Since that is not practical, it should be grown with transparency. I also think we should be kind to one another and not murder or steal, and I expect we'll experience that before transparency in food production.

      I don't mind you asking about my 'departure' from the Farmer's Market. The short answer is I was kicked out because I refused to fix my prices with what the other vendors were charging. The long answer is that most Farmer's Markets are a marketing tool, much like Organic Certification. They promote the idea that their products are 'fresh and local' and that they 'connect the community with local farmers.' The market has rules to protect their anchor vendors and penalties for not following them. For example, some have rules of no re-selling, or that the product has to be grown within a certain distance of the market. One rule most have is price fixing. Now they aren't so blatant as to say how much to charge, rather it is worded 'no produce dumping' 'no selling below cost' or 'a fair price in line with the market'. My philosophy is that a Farmer's Market is where a farmer can sell his/her produce directly to the public and make more money than selling to a wholesaler or packing house at a price lower than what a retail grocer sells for, creating a win-win situation for the farmer and the consumer. This is diametrically opposed to the Farmer's Market which promotes that because the produce is 'fresh and local' and by supporting your local farmer you are keeping money in the local economy, that the consumer should pay a premium price. Before the market I would check what Walmart and the other local grocers were charging and price mine slightly less. The other vendors would check with each other and charge about the same. The day it hit the fan I was charging $1.00 for four ears of corn. Walmart and Safeway were at three for $1.00, the other two vendors selling corn at the FM were charging $1.00 for two. I was approached by a board member and the market manager and told I was violating the market rule of 'produce dumping' by 'selling below cost' and that I needed to charge what the other two were charging. My response was that I was making a fair amount based on investment (5,000 seeds cost me $35, assuming a yield of 4,000 ears I was making $965) and that in good conscience I couldn't charge more. I was told if I didn't raise my prices I would be kicked out, to which I said, 'Do what you have to do.' The end result is I was out and the anchor vendor had a speaker at his next annual farm tour present the topic 'Why is my corn fifty cents an ear?'

      Comment


      • ComfortablyNumb
        ComfortablyNumb commented
        Editing a comment
        klflowers I'm not discouraging shopping there, I believe in fresh, local produce and supporting local farmers. Just be aware there are re-sellers and price fixers there. Make offers if it is priced high, especially at the end of the market. Better yet, find a farm close to home and purchase off the farm. www.localharvet.org is a great place to connect with local farms.

      • Willy
        Willy commented
        Editing a comment
        +1 on ComfortablyNumb ‘s comment. A small% are “crooks”.

      • klflowers
        klflowers commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks for the local harvest link, There is a local place called Crab Tree Farms that I will check out. I am still going to go to the local Chattanooga Market - the peppers I can get there are excellent even if the prices are fixed. And they are still cheaper that Publix.
    • Willy
      Charter Member
      • Apr 2015
      • 1766
      • High Desert of the Great Southwest

      #48
      Golden rice, a GMO, finally approved for use in Bangladesh: https://theness.com/neurologicablog/...sh/#more-11293

      Comment


      • Meathead
        Meathead commented
        Editing a comment
        Great. Needed!
    • TheQuietOne
      Club Member
      • Sep 2018
      • 74
      • Oshkosh, WI

      #49
      Great article, Meathead. I think you would find Dr. Sarah Taber's take on food and farming very much in line with yours. She's a DPM. Doctor of Plant Medicine (who knew there was such a thing) and has been working in agriculture as a farm worker doing everything from de-tasseling corn to blueberry research on up to her current gig as an consultant on regulatory compliance. She has strong opinions and is often NSFW and will make you think about what's wrong with our food systems.

      https://twitter.com/SarahTaber_bww

      Comment


      • Willy
        Willy commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks for the mention of Sarah Taber. I hadn't heard of her. She sounds like a good source of reliable science with respect to food.
    • Willy
      Charter Member
      • Apr 2015
      • 1766
      • High Desert of the Great Southwest

      #50
      MattSayar The source of my 40% claim is the May 2014 issue of Nat Geo. They show that 38.6% of earth's non-iced (non-iced being a fact I omitted) land is devoted to agriculture, 46.5% is undeveloped (forests, high mountains, tundra, deserts) and 14.9% is "other" (erosion, rural housing/business, urban, planted forests/logging, mines, roads, reservoirs, railways).

      There really isn't any significant land area left that is not already being exploited. I phrased my comment a bit better in an earlier post on this thread where I wrote: "Not much is left to exploit except the tropical rain forest regions and I don’t think we want to go there".

      I think many people have a somewhat naive view of agriculture as "blending in with nature"--Farmer John puffing on his corn cob pipe while birds flit and deer frolic. In reality, large-scale agriculture (especially crops) is extremely hostile to "nature". Every acre planted with corn, wheat, taters, whatever is an acre unavailable for Bambi and Thumper. The more we till, the less (pardon the cliche) biodiversity, the fewer places for recreation, etc.

      Land for agriculture is a hot topic. Try some Google searches for articles. I find this whole discussion fascinating; I hope you do too.

      Comment

      • Bigmagic
        Club Member
        • Feb 2018
        • 10
        • South Central Michigan

        #51
        Meathead, I"ll meet you at the pearly gates with the glasses and the sauce! Thanks for not succumbing to the political correctness and food police!

        Comment

        • ComfortablyNumb
          Club Member
          • May 2017
          • 2547
          • Northeast Washington
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          #52
          I came across this article today, thought it might be of interest to this discussion.

          https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevens.../#7a9e342d683b

          Comment


          • Dick Anderson
            Dick Anderson commented
            Editing a comment
            Thanks, ComfortablyNumb very timely. Top story last evening and this morning in the Bay Area is EWG's Dirty Dozen.

          • Meathead
            Meathead commented
            Editing a comment
            Thanks. I shall read the original research and update my article.
        • Willy
          Charter Member
          • Apr 2015
          • 1766
          • High Desert of the Great Southwest

          #53
          Murdy First, let me again acknowledge your listing of Spam as an unusual meat you've eaten. I still chuckle about it--it was brilliant!

          On this thread https://pitmaster.amazingribs.com/fo...80-woe-is-kale You wrote:

          ""They are funded by many of the big players in the organic market"

          The other side is bigger (ADM, Monsanto, Kraft, etc), has an even bigger financial interest and is capable of pushing back hard. Meanwhile, government watchdog agencies are lobbied and hamstrung by Congressional directives imposed at the behest of industry lobbyists.

          Consumers are left wondering who to trust. Nevertheless, common sense would seem to dictate that one should avoid eating things used to poison other things."

          I think that it is not correct to assert that "Big Ag" has a bigger financial stake in any practical sense. Both "sides" have their financial interest and their bottom lines as an all important concern to themselves. Whole Foods is every bit as financially involved as is ADM, as are Ma 'n' Pa businesses for that matter. Also, I'm unaware of "Big Ag" "pushing back" hard in any dishonest sense.

          Also, we consume TONS of "poisons" everyday day. Almost anything is a poison if taken in a large enough dose, including water, salt, and Vitamin D. Copper is necessary for human health, as is chromium. It doesn't take too much of an excess of either to make one seriously ill or even to kill. Arsenic isn't required for human health and it's deadly, but you consume some every day, in water and in food. It's a cliche, but it's true--the dose makes the poison.

          As to whom to trust? I think any food sold in the US today is 100% safe, whether organic or conventional--the occasional food poisoning scare aside--and I'd note that both organic and conventional foods both suffer contamination problems. I'd also note, imo, that "Big Organic" takes many more pot shots at "Big AG' than the other way around. When is last time you saw ADM or Monsanto claim their products were more nutritional than the equivalent organic products? I think, in that sense, "Big Organic" is the more dishonest of the two. Anyway, Meathead entitled his article: "Beware of the Marketeers". It's probably good advice to ignore any extravagant claims about any product.

          I don't worry about whom to trust, neither will hurt you at all, 'ceptin' organic will hurt more in the pocketbook as a rule. I do think the point in the Forbes article (linked below) is interesting--organic produce is not free from conventional pesticides contrary to what they say (and regardless of how that "contamination" occurred), so the question posed by Forbes--will you still eat organic or will you now refuse to because of the presence of pesticides?) is a good one and is worth pondering.


          The kale report that sparked the other thread is here: https://www.cnbc.com/2019/03/20/kale...egetables.html

          The Forbes article is here: https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevens.../#7a9e342d683b

          Thanks again to ComfortablyNumb for providing the two links.

          That's my take--feel free to disagree.

          Comment


          • Murdy
            Murdy commented
            Editing a comment
            Further, limiting the comparison between organic and non-organic to the presence of chemicals ignores other salient differences between the two.

          • Willy
            Willy commented
            Editing a comment
            @Murdy

            What other "salient differences" are there?

          • ComfortablyNumb
            ComfortablyNumb commented
            Editing a comment
            Murdy Not so much pushback, more like takeover. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.72b39c154ac7
        • grantgallagher
          Club Member
          • Feb 2018
          • 667
          • NJ

          #54
          So far ive refrained from posting in this thread and just been following with keen interest. I have loved the discussion. Nutrition (and everythig it encompasses) is a fascinating subject IMO because it is pretty much impossible to study. The level of investment from studiers and participants to properly control for variables over a long period of time is probably impossible. Eggs and cholesterol are my favorite theme to highlight the futility. As im sure many of you have probably seen, a recent study just said eggs are bad again.

          https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jam...stract/2728487

          of course it really helps that the full text is not available to the general public. I have access but i cant share the article because that would violate multiple laws.

          what is great about studies like this is that they do not control for how the eggs were cooked. Just like studies that say potatoes are bad but when you dig into it you find out most people “potato” consumption was via french fries.

          I did my undergrad in biochem then graduate in immunology. Nutrition and how we pretend to understand it will always be something that fascinates me. Give me a study that looks at people who consumed poached vs scrambled, cooked in the same salt content water or with the same amount of the same butter or oil (for example) that says both groups had the same result and ill appreciate it. But as i said, close to impossible to control for the length of time needed for a study like that.
          Last edited by grantgallagher; March 22nd, 2019, 01:05 AM.

          Comment


          • grantgallagher
            grantgallagher commented
            Editing a comment
            And also full disclosure at the irony of me posting in this thread. I work in pharma marketing. My job is to make sure the science is properly integrated into promotional materials and no one is telling porkies. Feel free to take that with as many pinches of salt as needed but i do take pride in making sure anything that comes out of our shop is fully supported by current science. Does that mean we will never get anything wrong...hell no. But we do try

          • Willy
            Willy commented
            Editing a comment
            Welcome to the conversation! I hope you stick around, especially given your background. I agree that nutrition is an "impossible" subject to study well. In "In Defense of Food", Michael Pollan discusses the very real, and hard to overcome, difficulties. I also think the media, in general, does a poor job of explaining the "latest study", hence the public's perception of the science is skewed unfairly. Science journalism is a specialty field and most journalists haven't the training for it.
            Last edited by Willy; March 22nd, 2019, 11:12 AM.

          • grantgallagher
            grantgallagher commented
            Editing a comment
            Willy the media does an absolutely terrible job of covering this topic. People writing up blogs for clicks. The potato example i gave was one that drove me nuts. The title of the post specifically called out potatos yet when you read the study they actually attributed it to french fries. Whether thats true or not its how stuff gets twisted by clicks.
        • obiQsmoker
          Club Member
          • Jul 2018
          • 146
          • Seattle Area
          • Started this tasty craziness in 2018.
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            So much to learn, but it’s a helluva fun education!

          #55
          I just want to thank all of you for this. I have no background or knowledge to offer, but appreciate, SO appreciate, the information you folks are willing to share, and the respectful and thoughtful manner you share it. It’s refreshing. While I thought I was joining a BBQ community, little did I know the amazing group of thinkers I’d encounter.

          Comment


          • Willy
            Willy commented
            Editing a comment
            Ah! We're successful! We've deceived you into thinking we're "thinkers". LOL ;«)

            More seriously, do feel free to join in. It's fun and this website has successfully encouraged civil discussion, something not found on many websites
        • ComfortablyNumb
          Club Member
          • May 2017
          • 2547
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          #56
          Murdy Give this a read. https://www.ocf.berkeley.edu/~lhom/organictext.html Now, allow me to quote a wise person, "Nevertheless, common sense would seem to dictate that one should avoid eating things used to poison other things." Certified Organic (CO) does not guarantee the food has not had pesticides used in its production. What it guarantees is that pesticides produced synthetically have not been knowingly used, unless the farmer is dishonest or it is from the list of synthetic pesticides approved for organic use. One of CO's marketing strategies is to promote they don't use dangerous 'chemicals' that are 'unsafe' and 'bad for the environment'. However they don't talk about what they use, and when pressed call it 'organic or natural sprays' as if it is quite innocuous. Now, let's zoom out and look at the bigger picture. CO has had the word 'organic' legally protected for their use, everyone who is not certified is called 'conventional'. To become certified the farmer has to pay fees, pay someone to inspect the farm, and either keep or pay someone to maintain records. Those costs are passed onto the consumer. The farmer is only allowed to use inputs that are on an approved list, many of which cost more than other available inputs and generally require the use of more to be as effective. CO will paint all non-CO farmers with the same brush, you would think they are all out there putting massive amounts of chemicals. Fact is, non-CO farmers are free to do whatever they please. Many use organic methods, they just prefer not to go through the hassle of certifying. And some don't use any pesticides. How do I know? I'm one. On my farm in Stevens County I have never used a pesticide. I also know some organic farmers who don't use pesticides, but they choose to get certified so they can get more money for their crops. The point I'm trying to make is that if you genuinely want food that has not been treated with pesticides you must grow it yourself or deal with a farmer who you know and trust won't use them.

          Comment


          • Murdy
            Murdy commented
            Editing a comment
            I did not mean organic = pesticide free; the Forbes piece notes cross contamination from conventional ag. My point is a flawed try at regulation is better than no attempt. Limiting purchases to farms I know would drastically alter my diet (I don't live near a banana plantation). Maybe stricter oversight is warranted? Or reform? Abolition of the organic designation or relying on the conscience of individual businessmen seems extreme.
            As for the cost, that's apparent when one makes a purchase.

          • ComfortablyNumb
            ComfortablyNumb commented
            Editing a comment
            Murdy Bananas, eh? Organic banana producers use Rotenone, currently banned in the States. Highly toxic to fish and connected to Parkinson's Disease. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rotenone

          • klflowers
            klflowers commented
            Editing a comment
            You are killing me. I should have ignored this thread and blissfully continued paying more... wait, I don't buy that marked stuff labeled organic - too costly, and I never believed these people anyway.
        • CaptainMike
          Club Member
          • Nov 2015
          • 2059
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          #57
          This is a very interesting thread that I check in on from time to time. Something that often comes to mind for me is when these and many other "hot" topics become politicized, monetized, and occasionally weaponized they begin to lose credibility (at least with me). Much like what grantgallagher shared about not seeing the full context of a study, you must ask "why" or "why not". Usually a case of "follow the money". I generally quit buying "organic" because this. Just my opinion, but it seems to have devolved to simply a marketing gimmick with only anecdotal benefits that are not wholly supported. That is not to say that we shouldn't do all we can to protect our food and food sources, I just don't buy the hype. Now, off to the Farmer's Market.....

          Comment


          • Huskee
            Huskee commented
            Editing a comment
            Same! I am a skeptic and my wife believes most of what she sees on labels. We are often at odds with this sort of thing. I feel like most things are put on labels by someone with a financial interest or another agenda, she believes everyone is good and trying to help us and labels tell the whole truth.
        • Meathead
          BBQ Whisperer, Mythbuster
          • May 2014
          • 1127
          • Chicago area
          • Remember, no rules in the bedroom or kitchen
            Meathead

          #58
          I love the way you have dug into this. I have made significant revisions to the original post in the book manuscript and after doing some more digging I will post the revised version. Crowd sourcing!

          Comment

          • FireMan
            Charter Member
            • Jul 2015
            • 6555
            • Bottom of Winnebago

            #59
            A question to be asked, to which does it matter? Some one mentioned Asians using MSG for decades ............and with what results. It all comes to man trying to take care of things, whether it be healthwise, politics, science (which with time can be questionable), money or power or all of the above. The quest for what......... History shows a poor track record, is it improving?

            Comment


            • CaptainMike
              CaptainMike commented
              Editing a comment
              Not likely, nor likely to. It's still a (mostly) fun ride though.

            • FireMan
              FireMan commented
              Editing a comment
              That’s called outlook. 👍 🕶

            • Huskee
              Huskee commented
              Editing a comment
              Ain't that the troof! Despite some good intentions from individuals or large groups, and lots of bad ones, it is not improving big picture-wise. We need to make the smartest decisions we can with the knowledge we have, and share the good knowledge we have with those who'll listen.
          • Willy
            Charter Member
            • Apr 2015
            • 1766
            • High Desert of the Great Southwest

            #60
            Murdy I'm really not trying to be contrarian or argumentative here, so please don't read my posts that way. After I retired ten years ago, I became seriously interested in home gardening and joined a Master Gardener program. The MG program is associated with university County Extension Offices which are in every state (and likely almost every county) in the US. They are science-based organizations and work in conjunction with paid Extension Office employees and degreed university instructors. They exist to help local commercial growers and the public at large deal with ag issues--disease, poor yields, soil analysis, pests, and whatever. BTW, getting into the MG program involves only a forty hour class (followed by a test), so take the word "master" with a grain of salt. My view is it's a way to blow smoke up the skirts of unpaid volunteers. :«) Nonetheless, most MGs are serious and continue to educate themselves regularly, mostly through further study on their own.

            I began as an advocate of "organic", not rabid, but solidly pro. It just makes sense right--no "poisons" and going back to the way Mom Nature "intended" can't be wrong? Well, yes it can in some ways. Elsewhere herein I've posted about organic practices being unable to use land efficiently with respect to yields per unit of land as compared to conventional agriculture. We really have no more land to farm or raise livestock on without cultivating land that is currently wild. Also, organic ag does use pesticides, approved as "organic" because they are "natural" and some of which are quite toxic to wildlife and, in some cases, humans--copper fungicides and rotenone are two examples. I read a lot and attended agriculture conferences every year since becoming a MG. The more I learned, the more disillusioned I became with "organic". Michael Pollan's book "The Omnivore's Dilemma" was a real eye opener as regards "Big Organic" (not necessarily your farmers market organic grower, although ComfortablyNumb posted some revealing information about dishonest practices at farmers markets earlier in this thread). I think the final straw for me was when "Organic Gardening Magazine" (now called Rodale's Organic Life and now owned by Penguin Random House) came out advocating for homeopathic "medicine". Homeopathy is often perceived by most folks as some form of herbalism, which is often harmful in itself, but it isn't herbalism at all. Homeopathy is simply magic water, magic water that literally doesn't even have a single molecule of an "active" ingredient left because of successive dilutions, coupled with "succussing" between each dilution. The founder of homeopathy believed that the weaker the solution, the more potent it was, because the water "remembered" the potency. One active ingredient in a popular homeopathic "medicine" is duck liver (!!!). Succussing is slamming a container of the solution against a board. You can read about homeopathy here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homeopathy and you can ponder the fact that most "health food stores" carry a wide ranges of homeopathic products. Our local store even has an employee who is a registered nurse to assist one in finding the proper remedy for you.

            I am now an active skeptic of organic as it is marketed. It was a long road for me, for, as you commented, who can argue against wanting to reduce consumption of "poisons". Well, as I noted yesterday, almost everything is a poison in some sense and at some dose. Overcoming our innate, intuitive, LAYMAN'S understandings of technical topics takes study and self-questioning. After all, do Einstein's ideas on time not being constant make intuitive sense to anyone?

            Anyway, rant over. As for your comment about needing "stricter oversight", I'd ask what it is that makes you think current oversight is lax and in what areas?
            Last edited by Willy; March 24th, 2019, 01:12 PM.

            Comment

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            Bring The Heat With Broil King Signet's Dual Tube Burners

            the good one grill

            The Broil King Signet 320 is a modestly priced, 3-burner gas grill that packs a lot of value and power under the hood. Broil King's proprietary, dual-tube burners get hot fast and are able to achieve high, searing temps that rival most comparatively priced gas grills. The quality cast aluminum housing carries a Limited Lifetime Warranty.

            Click here to read our complete review


            The Good-One Is A Superb Grill And A Superb Smoker All In One

            the good one grill

            The Good-One Open Range is a charcoal grill with an offset smoke chamber attached. It is dramatically different from a traditional offset smoker. The grill sits low in front and doubles as a firebox for the smoke chamber which is spliced on above and behind so it can work like a horizontal offset smoker only better. By placing the heat source behind and under the smokebox instead of off to the side, Open Range produces even temperature from left to right, something almost impossible to achieve with a standard barrel shaped offset.

            Click here to read our complete review


            Pit Barrel Cooker Smoker

            Griddle And Deep Fryer All In One

            The flat top does the burgers and the fryer does the fries. Use the griddle for bacon, eggs, and home fries. Or pancakes, fajitas, grilled cheese, you name it. Why stink up the house deep frying and spatter all over? Do your fried chicken and calamari outside. Blackstone's Rangetop Combo With Deep Fryer does it all. Plus it has a built in cutting board, garbage bag holder, and paper towel holder. An additional work table on the left side provides plenty of counter space.

            Click here to read our detailed review and to order


            Pit Barrel Cooker Smoker

            The Pit Barrel Cooker May Be Too Easy

            The PBC has a rabid cult following for good reason. It is absolutely positively without a doubt the best bargain on a smoker in the world. Period. This baby will cook circles around the cheap offset sideways barrel smokers in the hardware stores because temperature control is so much easier. Best of all, it is only $299 delivered to your door!

            Click here to read our detailed review and the raves from people who own them


            The Swiss Army Knife Of Thermometers

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            The smart folks at ThermoWorks have finally done it: The Swiss Army Knife of thermometers, two in one. Start with the industry standard food thermometer, the Thermapen MK4, (Platinum Medal winner) truly instant (2 to 3 seconds) precise (+ or – 0.7°F). Then they built in an infrared thermometer ideal for measuring the temps of pizza stones, griddles, and frying pans (also great for finding leaks around doors and windows in your house).

            Click here to read our test results and comprehensive review and why it won our Platinum Medal.


            Compact Powerful Sear Machine For Your Next Tailgater

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            Char-Broil's Grill2Go x200 is a super-portable, fun little sizzler made of heavy, rust-proof cast aluminum. The lid snaps shut. Grab the handle and you're off to the party! Char-Broil's TRU-Infrared design produces searing heat while reducing fuel consumption. A 16 ounce LP gas canister is enough to keep you flipping burgers for hours.

            Click here to read our detailed review and to order


            The Cool Kettle With The Hinged Hood We Always Wanted

            NK-22-Ck Grill

            Their NK22CK-C Charcoal Kettle Grill puts a few spins on the familiar kettle design. In fact, the hinged lid with a handle on the front, spins in a rotary motion 180 degrees. It's hard to beat a Weber kettle, but Napoleon holds its own and adds some unique features to make the NK22CK-C a viable alternative.

            Click here for more about what makes this grill special


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            G&F Suede Welder's Gloves

            Heat Resistant Gloves With Extra Long Sleeves Hold The Hot Stuff

            If you're using oven mitts at the grill, it's time to trade up. Say hello to these suede welder's gloves. They're heat resistant enough to handle hot grill grates, and flexible enough to handle tongs. The extra long sleeves even let you reach deep into the firebox to move hot logs without getting burned. Our Fave.

            Click here to read our detailed review

            Click here to order from Amazon


            GrillGrates Take Gas Grills To The Infrared Zone

            grill grates

            GrillGrates(TM) amplify heat, prevent flareups, make flipping foods easier, keep small foods from committing suicide, kill hotspots, are easier to clean, flip over to make a fine griddle, and can be easily removed and moved from one grill to another. You can even throw wood chips, pellets, or sawdust between the rails and deliver a quick burst of smoke to whatever is above. Every gas grill needs them.

            Click here for more about what makes these grates so special


            kareubequ bbq smoker

            Our Favorite Backyard Smoker

            The amazing Karubecue is the most innovative smoker in the world. The quality of meat from this machine is astonishing. At its crux is a patented firebox that burns logs above the cooking chamber and sucks heat and extremely clean blue smoke into the thermostat controlled oven. It is our favorite smoker, period.

            Click here for our review of this superb smoker


            Masterbuilt MPS 340/G ThermoTemp XL Propane Smoker

            masterbuilt gas smoker

            The First Propane Smoker With A Thermostat Makes This Baby Foolproof

            Set ThermoTemp's dial from 175° to 350°F and the thermostat inside will adjust the burner just like an indoor kitchen oven. All you need to do is add wood to the tray above the burner to start smokin'.

            Click here to read our detailed review


            Professional Steakhouse Knife Set

            masterbuilt gas smoker

            Our founder, Meathead, wanted the same steak knives used by steakhouses such as Peter Luger, Smith & Wollensky, Morton's, Kobe Club, Palm, and many others. So he located the manufacturer and had them stamp our name on some. They boast pointed, temper-ground, serrated, high-carbon stainless-steel, half-tang blades with excellent cutting edge ability. The beefy hardwood handle provides a comfortable grip secured by three hefty rivets. He has machine washed his more than 100 times. They have never rusted and they stay shiny without polishing. Please note that we do not make, sell, or distribute these knives, they just engrave them with our name.

            Click here to read our detailed review and to order


            PK 360 grill

            Is This Superb Charcoal Grill A Kamado Killer?

            The PK-360, with 360 square inches of cooking space, this rust free, cast aluminum charcoal grill is durable and easy to use. Four-way venting means it's easy to set up for two zone cooking with more control than single vent Kamado grills. It is much easier to set up for 2-zone cooking than any round kamado. Beautifully designed and completely portable. Meathead says it is his preferrred grill.

            Click here to read our detailed review of the PK 360

            Click here to order it direct from PK and get a special deal for AmazingRibs.com readers only


            Fireboard: The Ultimate Top Of The Line BBQ Thermometer

            fireboard bbq thermometer

            With the ability to monitor up to six temperatures simultaneously with either Bluetooth or Wifi on your mobile phone, tablet, or computer, Fireboard is the best digital thermometer we’ve tested.

            Click here to read our detailed review


            Finally, A Great Portable Pellet Smoker

            Green Mountain Davey Crockett Grill

            Green Mountain's portable Davy Crockett Pellet Smoker is one mean tailgating and picnic machine. But it's also gaining popularity with people who want to add a small, set it and forget it pellet smoker to their backyard arsenal. And with their WiFi capabilities you can control and monitor Davy Crocket from your smart phone or laptop.

            Click here to read our detailed review and to order