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Making soup stocks

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    Making soup stocks


    Yesterday I took a bunch of leftovers and turned them into stock. When I cook chickens or beef with bones, I freeze the bones after dinner if I don’t have time then to make the stock. So, yesterday I went through the freezer and discovered I had two chicken carcasses from smoked/roast chicken and a gallon bag of beef bones. Pulled then all out and made chicken and beef stock with them. To the beef stock, I added the broth from the smoked pot roast I made yesterday :-)

    Basics of a Chicken stock
    • 1 chicken carcass
    • 1 onion, cut in quarters
    • 2 celery stalks, cut into 2 inch chunks, leave the leafy parts on for more flavor
    • 2 carrots, cut into 2 inch chunks and halved. Don’t peel them
    • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
    • Cover the carcass and about 1” more with water
    • Bring to boil, then lower to simmer
    • Simmer for 4 hours, give or take
    • While simmering, skim off foam about every hour
    • Strain everything out of the broth.
    • Pull any remaining meat off the bones, add back to the broth
    • Add another cup or so of water
    • Simmer for another hour
    • Cool and store .... some people use mason jars. I use quart bags and then freeze
    Basics of a Beef stock
    • 3 good beef bones from steak, rib roast, ribs
    • 1 onion, cut in quarters (I used pearl onions this time cause i had some)
    • 2 celery stalks, cut into 2 inch chunks, leave the leafy parts on for more flavor
    • 2 carrots, cut into 2 inch chunks and halved. Don’t peel them
    • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
    • Cover the bones and veggies and about 1” more with water
    • Bring to boil, then lower to simmer
    • Simmer for 4 hours, give or take
    • While simmering, skim off foam about every hour
    • Strain everything out of the broth.
    • Pull any remaining meat off the bones, add back to the broth
    • Add another cup or so of water
    • Simmer for another hour
    • Cool and store .... some people use mason jars. I use quart bags and then freeze
    Just put everything together for the chicken stock, about to bring to a boil
    Click image for larger version

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    Simmering away, chicken stock is getting close
    Click image for larger version

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    It’s done, I’m going to strain the veggies and carcass, then add back any meat I have, add some more water, and simmer a bit longer
    Click image for larger version

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    Here’s a finished beef stock
    Click image for larger version

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    #2
    Nice, Eric. I love homemade stock. I make it in my 10qt Instant Pot. Shorter cook time, no skimming, minimal loss to evaporation. Also, I never remember to save the bones from cooked chicken or beef. I buy chicken backs at the supermarket when they go on sale for$.50/lb. I roast then in a very hot oven for about an hour. I roast the mirepoix in the same oven for the last half hour.

    Comment


    • ecowper
      ecowper commented
      Editing a comment
      If you don’t have any chicken carcasses, those chicken backs work great!

    • TripleB
      TripleB commented
      Editing a comment
      I’m with you Dewesq55. I roast the meat and vegetables First. Gotta make sure you scrap up the fond with a little water. Then put in stock pot, cover with water and bring to barely a simmer. I let it go for about 10 hours. You get a dark and rich broth.

    #3
    YUM!!!! I do same same, save them bones up in th freezer, an boil em up later!!!

    Yer house has gotta be smellin Great, Brother!!!!
    Last edited by Mr. Bones; October 11, 2020, 01:14 PM.

    Comment


    • ecowper
      ecowper commented
      Editing a comment
      Between smoked pot roast and two different stocks, what it reminds me of is my grandmother’s house every time I’d go over and see her. She always had a soup going, something baking, and fresh bread.

    • Mr. Bones
      Mr. Bones commented
      Editing a comment
      Man, what a slice of Nostalgia, an Heaven! ecowper

    • ecowper
      ecowper commented
      Editing a comment
      Mr. Bones Grandma was that sort. Always cooking, baking, roasting, something. And she was a dead ringer for Mrs. Claus in looks.

    #4
    Man, one of the great things about Fall. Plus bulkier clothing so I can carry my......uh......lunch. Yeah, my lunch....
    Last edited by CaptainMike; October 11, 2020, 01:58 PM.

    Comment


    • ecowper
      ecowper commented
      Editing a comment
      It sure does make it easier to carry your lunch without people noticing

    • tbob4
      tbob4 commented
      Editing a comment
      You are just putting on calories to climb Mt. Shasta in a blizzard with a mini-keg on your back while rescuing back-country skiers. By the way, I failed run-on sentence structure in HS.

    • ecowper
      ecowper commented
      Editing a comment
      tbob4 “calories” ... under our loose fitting sweatshirts and hoodies. Yup ;-)

    #5
    Good work, sir. But don't forget the garlic!!

    Comment


    • ecowper
      ecowper commented
      Editing a comment
      The beef stock was based off the pot roast juice, plenty o’garlic there.

    #6
    That looks great. Love making broth. Bet the house smelled so good while you were making it. Delicious

    Comment


      #7
      THAT is why I’m always telling people to put those bones etc. into their freezers. Homemade stocks are SO much better than 99+% of what’s generally available for most people to purchase. Most of it glorified salt water.

      I advise the same for a lot of their veg trimmings as well. Sure, it may not have the impact of completely fresh, but those celery tops and the like that they would toss out anyway...freeze ‘em. Both ends of those carrots they didn’t want? Freeze ‘em.

      I convinced a friend to do just that...and when they had filled a large bag with stuff they would have otherwise trashed...we made a stock. They were blown away. Not only because it had a depth of flavour that store brands never have, but also because it’s so freaking simple. They’ve since began purchasing things specifically for stock but still keep trimmings & bones/carcasses.

      Comment


      • ecowper
        ecowper commented
        Editing a comment
        I also cry when I see someone throwing away bones, carcasses, etc

      #8
      I'm all about the instant pot for stock.
      Last edited by Attjack; October 12, 2020, 10:27 PM.

      Comment


      • Attjack
        Attjack commented
        Editing a comment
        I always do mine for 2 or 3 hours and let it switch to warm overnight. But that's just because I'm lazy.

      • crazytown3
        crazytown3 commented
        Editing a comment
        A big +1 on using the IP. I make chicken stock from the Costco rotisserie chicken leftover carcass. I throw the bones, skin, all of it in there with some vegetables and let er rip. Tons of gelatin and good stuff out of that.

      • Skip
        Skip commented
        Editing a comment
        I agree on the IP. IMO it makes for wonderful stock for soups.

      #9
      I make stock all the time, not only beef and chicken but pork, shrimp, and turkey. Makes the best soups and gumbo.

      Comment


      • ecowper
        ecowper commented
        Editing a comment
        I just saved the bone from a small pork blade roast. I will use it to make a ham stock for cooking beans :-)

      #10
      I'll put stock in ice cube trays and freeze. Bag them up and use them when you need just a small shot of stock.

      Comment


      • surfdog
        surfdog commented
        Editing a comment
        Yep...I also measure out various amounts...
        So I generally have stock frozen between 1 & 8 ounces available.

      #11
      Looks great! I do the same thing...keep all bones and old veggies in freezer and wait until I have a large amount of it to make a brodo. I do 80/20 water to bones. Depending on types of bones I may blanch them first. Beef bones always get blanched - from cold bring up to boil and dump out. This will get a lot of the scum out and make for a clearer stock down the road. Some other tips:
      • Always start from cold water and skim skim skim as it comes up. Do not add aromatics until this happens as its easier to skim without aromatics
      • if the brodo has beef bones, its an overnight cook - needs a good 8 hours to get out all the gelatin
      • If you can find chicken feet add them - they add tons of gelatin to the broth
      • you can add aromatics for the last couple of hours and they will keep a fresher flavor - no need for aromatics to be in there for full 12 hours
      • I usually don't roast/brown raw bones for this - I like to keep the broth as clean an neutral as possible. Granted if you want a 'brown' stock go ahead and roast away
      • typical aromatics - mirepoix, garlic, black peppercorn, bay, parsley, thyme. Parmesan rind is a great addition if you have
      • Make sure pot is at a bare simmer - the less you agitate the bones, the clearer the stock will be.
      • Make a remoulage - 'Remy' for short. This is a second cook of the bones and aromatics that you can make a reduction out of for pan sauces
      • My usual timeline for stock making - Friday evening get bones going up to simmer - sat AM add aromatics - Sat evening strain. Can refill pot at this point with cold water and begin remy. Sunday mid day - strain remy and reduce 3/4 till it coats back of spoon - strain and freeze

      Comment


      • crazytown3
        crazytown3 commented
        Editing a comment
        Wow, I like it. That's definitely a "pro" version compared to my process.

      • surfdog
        surfdog commented
        Editing a comment
        Proper

      #12
      Pobeque What you said regarding the chicken feet! It make the broth so unctuous that your lips stick together! So good for you and it gives you a shiny coat 🤪

      Comment


      • ecowper
        ecowper commented
        Editing a comment
        I need a shiny coat! I guess I need to do the chicken feet thing, not just the wing tips

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