Welcome!


This is a membership forum. As a guest, you can click around a bit. View 5 pages for free. If you would like to participate, please join.

[ Pitmaster Club Information | Join Now | Login | Contact Us ]

There are 4 page views remaining.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

My observation on reverse searing

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    My observation on reverse searing

    So I've cooked steaks by searing first, then finishing as well as the reverse sear method. It seams to me that using the reverse sear method I get less of a sear. It seams like reverse searing brings the juices to the surface of the meat and when I put them in the cast iron pan it's more of a steaming effect and I don't get the same crust on the outside

    #2
    Before reverse searing, I pat off the moisture on both sides of the meat and then spray a little veg. oil or duck fat and sear. Always get a good crust doing this.

    Comment


    • Starsky
      Starsky commented
      Editing a comment
      I usually use some olive oil to hold the spices on the meat but was thinking that if I blot the surface I'd be removing the oil and spices

    • wrgilb
      wrgilb commented
      Editing a comment
      Gently blot after your cool zone cook. The spices will be well set, then add some oil right before you sear.

    #3
    I always front sear and finish low and slow. I have more control over both the sear and finished temp.

    One thing that seldom gets mentioned, is that it helps to blot the surface moisture off each time just before you flip.

    Comment


    • HawkerXP
      HawkerXP commented
      Editing a comment
      I use my tongue for this.

    • TripleB
      TripleB commented
      Editing a comment
      Unless it’s a large roast, I do the same thing for the reason you post- more control over the sear and finished temp. To me, the sear is where the flavor is and that’s what I want to develop.

    • Murdy
      Murdy commented
      Editing a comment
      HawkerXP -- My tongue leave too much moisture behind, so I have to blot it off after I lick it.

    #4
    Well, to each his own. Cook the way you prefer. I do like the reverse sear though, but the key is to wait 5-10 minutes before searing. This lets you ride out any carryover heat, and you should always pat the surface dry. Like you have already found out, if the surface is moist then there will be no sear.

    Comment


    • Troutman
      Troutman commented
      Editing a comment
      +2 Yup. I'm also still a proponent of David Parrish 's cold grate method. Beyond that it does matter the thickness. Sometimes a thin steak may benefit from a fast front sear.

    • Henrik
      Henrik commented
      Editing a comment
      Agree. Thin steak => front sear.

    • Dewesq55
      Dewesq55 commented
      Editing a comment
      I prefer front sear for a good thick steak. I find I get better ability to hit my target IT with less/minimal carryover cooking by finishing at the lower cooker temp. Also, I can pretty much sear as much as I like without risk of overcooking. For thinner streaks I prefer old fashioned hot and fast with flipping every 30 seconds until done.

    #5
    I just saw this Mad Scientist BBQ video on YouTube a couple of days ago, I thought it was interesting. He compares about every way imaginable on how to sear a steak. In a blind taste test his wife and friend chose the sous vide then torched steak. I own that same torch but have never used it to sear steak. I have it on my list to give it a try.

    Comment


    • Huskee
      Huskee commented
      Editing a comment
      I know mgaretz is a fan of the torch, SV then sear tri tips if memory serves. I have one but never use it, I should experiment more.

    • mgaretz
      mgaretz commented
      Editing a comment
      Huskee is correct except I use it on steaks, chops and more. Gotta have the correct torch though. You want a Bernzomatic heat shrink torch. One of those small kitchen torches won’t cut it. Also important to start the torch well away from the meat so unburned fuel doesn’t get on the meat. I also pat dry and dust the meat with dextrose (corn sugar from the local home brew store) before torching.
      Last edited by mgaretz; February 12, 2021, 09:46 AM.

    • grantgallagher
      grantgallagher commented
      Editing a comment
      I just did this with some filet mignon for vday dinner last night. Sous vide and torch is now my go to method for winter steaks that i would normally reverse sear. Saves charcoal and works really really well.

    #6
    ALWAYS get the meat as dry as possible before reverse searing. I do this and then use a MED HOT skillet (cast iron works best) with melted butter and my reverse sears are perfect.

    Comment


      #7
      Yea that Guga guy sold me on this bad boy. It's so cool just to fire up !!!!

      Comment


      • Henrik
        Henrik commented
        Editing a comment
        Yup, you NEED a bad boy like that, me thinks. Very cool.

      #8
      Both methods work fine. I find myself front searing more though these days.

      Comment


        #9
        I've been enjoying the afterburner technique with a 3/4" steak more and more. It gets the steak in my mouth quickly.

        Comment


        • Attjack
          Attjack commented
          Editing a comment
          Yeah, one step is all you need in a thin steak.

        #10
        I’m a diehard reverse sear guy, and I always cook steaks with charcoal or wood. When the steaks get to pull temp I set them aside and get the fire blazing hot. Giant flames from a fresh wood fire never have a problem getting a good, crisp sear!

        Comment


          #11
          Also reverse sear. Never tried this method until I came to this forum, now I would not cook steaks any other way. Also agree with pulling the steak, drying the surface and getting that fire very hot before putting back on.

          Comment


            #12
            I love to front sear thick steaks over my chimney starter then dump the coals in the SnS and finish indirect in my kettle. I wait and add my seasoning after the sear so it doesn’t burn.

            Comment


              #13
              Meat cooks from the outside-in. That’s the problem with front sear. If you are cooking steaks you get a bland grey band of meat between the surface and the center. I take it a step further by tossing my steaks in the freezer for a half hour before going to the grill. That way the exterior of the meat is colder than the interior at the beginning of the cook.

              Comment


              • Huskee
                Huskee commented
                Editing a comment
                I let mine come up to room temp for approx 4-5hours (put 'em on the counter around lunch time), then freeze about 30 mins before cooking just like you say. If you don't overdo the sear time then this way will do them perfectly even w/ front sear.

              #14
              Huskee Agreed. It's all about the exterior being colder than the interior. I like them REALLY cold if I'm using the 14.5 WSM fully lit, with all of the vents open and on the top grate with the bowl removed. The exposure to the radiant heat builds a pretty good sear before the reverse sear.

              Comment


                #15
                I am a big fan on the continuous flip method. I flip my steaks about every 20 seconds or so, and you get to watch that crust slowly develop. Run the grill HOT and get to flipping. It works excellent.

                Comment


                • AllenW
                  AllenW commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Do you get a pretty good sear that way? I have been getting my sear then slow cooking till done but always open to a better or different way. tia

                • Richard Chrz
                  Richard Chrz commented
                  Editing a comment
                  this is the way I cook most of my steaks now, I rarely spring for a steak that I would reverse sear. I've really become a fan of the skinny angus ribeyes.

                • Spinaker
                  Spinaker commented
                  Editing a comment
                  You et an awesome sear, it just take time to build. But no longer than any other method. It is fun to watch the crust develop. You have way more control over the color you like. AllenW

              Announcement

              Collapse
              No announcement yet.
              Working...
              X
              false
              0
              Guest
              500
              ["pitmaster-my-membership","login","join-pitmaster","lostpw","reset-password","special-offers","help","nojs","meat-ups","gifts","authaau-alpha","ebooklogin-start","alpha","start"]
              false
              false
              {"count":0,"link":"/forum/announcements/","debug":""}
              Yes
              Rubs Promo

              Spotlight

              These are not ads or paid placements. These are some of our favorite tools and toys.

              These are products we have tested, won our top awards, and are highly recommend. Click here to read how we test, about our medals, and what they mean.

              Use Our Links To Help Keep Us Alive

              A big part of this site is our unbiased equipment and product reviews. We love playing with toys and we have no problem calling them the way we see them. Some companies pay a finder’s fee if a reader clicks a link on AmazingRibs.com and buys a product. It has zero impact on our reviews, zero impact on the price you pay, and the sites never tell us what you bought, but it has a major impact on our ability to keep this site alive! So before you buy, please click our links. Here’s a link that takes you to a page on Amazon that has some of our favorite tools and toys: https://tinyurl.com/amazingribs


              The Efficiency Of A Kamado Plus The Flexibility Of The Slow ‘N Sear Insert

              kamado grill
              Built around SnS Grill’s patented Slow ‘N Sear charcoal kettle accessory, this 22-inch kamado is a premium ceramic grill that brings true 2-zone cooking to a kamado.

              Click here for our article on this exciting cooker

               

              Comprehensive Temperature Magnet With 80+ Important Temps

              Amazingribs.com temperature magnet
              Winner of the National BBQ Association’s product of the year award. This 8.5″ x 11″ magnet contains more that 80 benchmark temperatures for meats (both USDA recommended temps as well as the temps chefs recommend), fats and oils, sugars, sous vide, eggs, collagens, wood combustion, breads, and more. Although it is not certified as all-weather, we have tested it outdoors in Chicago weather and it has not delaminated in three years, but there is minor fading.

              Click here to order.


              GrillGrates Take Gas Grills To The InfraredZone


              GrillGrates(TM) amplify heat, prevent flareups, make flipping foods easier, kill hotspots, flip over to make a fine griddle, and can be easily moved from one grill to another. You can even throw wood chips, pellets, or sawdust between the rails and deliver a quick burst of smoke.

              Click here for more about what makes these grates so special


              The Cool Kettle With The Hinged Hood We Always Wanted


              Napoleon’s 22″ Pro Cart Charcoal Kettle Grill puts a few spins on the familiar kettle design. In fact, the hinged lid with a handle on the front, spins in a rotary motion 180 degrees. It’s hard to beat a Weber kettle, but Napoleon holds its own and adds some unique features to make the 22″ Pro Cart a viable alternative.

              Click here for more about what makes this grill special


              Groundbreaking Hybrid Thermometer!

              Thermapen One Instant Read Thermometer

              The FireBoard Spark is a hybrid combining instant-read capability, a cabled temperature probe, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connectivity. We gave Spark a Platinum Medal for pushing the envelope of product capability while maintaining high standards of design and workmanship.

              Click here to read our comprehensive Platinum Medal review


              Bring The Heat With Broil King Signet’s Dual Tube Burners

              3 burner gas grill

              The Broil King Signet 320 is a modestly priced, 3-burner gas grill that packs a lot of value and power under the hood. Broil King’s proprietary, dual-tube burners get hot fast and are able to achieve high, searing temps that rival most comparatively priced gas grills. The quality cast aluminum housing carries a Limited Lifetime Warranty.

              Click here to read ourcompletereview


              Our Favorite Backyard Smoker

              The amazing Karubecue is the most innovative smoker in the world. The quality of meat from this machine is astonishing. At its crux is a patented firebox that burns logs above the cooking chamber and sucks heat and extremely clean blue smoke into the thermostat controlled oven. It is our favorite smoker, period.
              Click here for our review of this superb smoker