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Science and psychology of "warmed-over flavor"

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    #16
    Everything I cook gets eaten in it's entirety. Everything. If not tomorrow or the next day, it is vac sealed and saved for a rainy day.

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      #17
      I always cook for leftovers. My husband is a great leftover-eater. I love them because maybe I can get a night's respite from the cooking-every-day gig.

      I never ever reheat cooked meat like steaks or chicken. Soups, chili, stews, etc are fine reheated, but not a pure 'n simple cut of meat. I cannot stand the leftover smell and flavor of reheated meats. They're always eaten cold, right out of the fridge, with more salt, or horseradish or hot sauce. In fact I'll be enjoying leftover ribeye tonight--cold and tasty with some horseradish sauce on the side.

      Kathryn
      Last edited by fzxdoc; March 10, 2021, 02:11 PM.

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      • glitchy
        glitchy commented
        Editing a comment
        You ever try Sous Vide for reheating left over meat? Just curious if it would still have the smell/flavor issues.

      • fzxdoc
        fzxdoc commented
        Editing a comment
        Oh, indeed I have, glitchy . I sous-vided a beautiful piece of leftover tri-tip. It was the worst I have ever had. What a waste of delicious meat!

        Kathryn

      • glitchy
        glitchy commented
        Editing a comment
        The only thing I’ve ever reheated that way was pulled pork for my sons graduation, that way I wasn’t overheating it and drying it out, but could keep bags ready to go. It went from there into a roaster. I don’t think I’ll be trying to reheat a steak that way now =) I might try brisket sometime though.

      #18
      I am not a fan of eating leftovers the next day. In fact, unless I am making something that needs brining, I like to shop that day and cook whatever looks good in the store. When I retire, I look forward to doing that. On the other hand, stuff like chili, pork butt, brisket - things that are cooked in large quantities - get vac sealed and frozen and eaten over time.

      This really pisses my wife off, cause she is a big into leftovers cause she doesn't enjoy cooking as much as I do. She would rather make a big pot of something and eat it all week.

      There is one big exception - Thanksgiving. I eat leftover turkey and dressing for days after Thanksgiving.

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        #19
        For me I find that left over fish is difficult to eat. That is really disappointing when it is fish tacos. It's one of my favorites (fried not grilled but haven't really done any grilled) and to have it rather bland the next day really disappoints. It gets mealy. We use our Breville toaster convection oven to reheat way more that our microwave and it still comes out almost nasty. But I will eat it just because of the memory of the first meal.

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          #20
          I like to eat left overs. I eat them all the time, being that I live alone, it is pretty much all I eat.

          I make a thing called, "The magic skillet". I grab what I can from the fridge throw it in my No12 Finex, heat it up on the stove and then slide it into the oven. I let it bake and then whatever comes out, I EAT! And there is only me around to complain about it. So it works well. Most of the time it is some kind of meat, a veggie and something like a cheese or something like that.

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