Welcome!


This is a membership forum. As a guest, you can click around a bit. View 5 pages for free. If you would like to participate, please join.

[ Pitmaster Club Information | Join Now | Login | Contact Us ]

There are 4 page views remaining.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Science and psychology of "warmed-over flavor"

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • glitchy
    commented on 's reply
    The only thing I’ve ever reheated that way was pulled pork for my sons graduation, that way I wasn’t overheating it and drying it out, but could keep bags ready to go. It went from there into a roaster. I don’t think I’ll be trying to reheat a steak that way now =) I might try brisket sometime though.

  • fzxdoc
    commented on 's reply
    Oh, indeed I have, glitchy . I sous-vided a beautiful piece of leftover tri-tip. It was the worst I have ever had. What a waste of delicious meat!

    Kathryn

  • Spinaker
    replied
    I like to eat left overs. I eat them all the time, being that I live alone, it is pretty much all I eat.

    I make a thing called, "The magic skillet". I grab what I can from the fridge throw it in my No12 Finex, heat it up on the stove and then slide it into the oven. I let it bake and then whatever comes out, I EAT! And there is only me around to complain about it. So it works well. Most of the time it is some kind of meat, a veggie and something like a cheese or something like that.

    Leave a comment:


  • glitchy
    commented on 's reply
    You ever try Sous Vide for reheating left over meat? Just curious if it would still have the smell/flavor issues.

  • JimLinebarger
    replied
    For me I find that left over fish is difficult to eat. That is really disappointing when it is fish tacos. It's one of my favorites (fried not grilled but haven't really done any grilled) and to have it rather bland the next day really disappoints. It gets mealy. We use our Breville toaster convection oven to reheat way more that our microwave and it still comes out almost nasty. But I will eat it just because of the memory of the first meal.

    Leave a comment:


  • klflowers
    replied
    I am not a fan of eating leftovers the next day. In fact, unless I am making something that needs brining, I like to shop that day and cook whatever looks good in the store. When I retire, I look forward to doing that. On the other hand, stuff like chili, pork butt, brisket - things that are cooked in large quantities - get vac sealed and frozen and eaten over time.

    This really pisses my wife off, cause she is a big into leftovers cause she doesn't enjoy cooking as much as I do. She would rather make a big pot of something and eat it all week.

    There is one big exception - Thanksgiving. I eat leftover turkey and dressing for days after Thanksgiving.

    Leave a comment:


  • fzxdoc
    replied
    I always cook for leftovers. My husband is a great leftover-eater. I love them because maybe I can get a night's respite from the cooking-every-day gig.

    I never ever reheat cooked meat like steaks or chicken. Soups, chili, stews, etc are fine reheated, but not a pure 'n simple cut of meat. I cannot stand the leftover smell and flavor of reheated meats. They're always eaten cold, right out of the fridge, with more salt, or horseradish or hot sauce. In fact I'll be enjoying leftover ribeye tonight--cold and tasty with some horseradish sauce on the side.

    Kathryn
    Last edited by fzxdoc; March 10, 2021, 02:11 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Razor
    commented on 's reply
    Jfrosty27 turning the microwave down is the key. For our microwave 2 minutes at 50% is a magical formula. 😂

    Longer warm time at a lower power makes all the difference in the world and I’ll bet you a large majority of people don’t realize there are power settings.

  • FireMan
    commented on 's reply
    Yup, a less than yummy meal in the freezer is a frozen less than yummy meal! What a gas of a story you told about granny. Sounds like somethin else is goin on there, or not goin on.

  • FireMan
    commented on 's reply
    A trick with “the don’t just nuke it & dry it out” is put a small cup or bowl of water in the nukelator. I know there was another post where I was harping on listening to Meatheads post of an interview with Doc Blonder. Just might get ya thinkin differnt. Ernest was impressed.

  • Blues1
    replied
    Everything I cook gets eaten in it's entirety. Everything. If not tomorrow or the next day, it is vac sealed and saved for a rainy day.

    Leave a comment:


  • IowaGirl
    replied
    I think one of the ways to manage leftovers wisely is to be careful about what gets put in the freezer and what doesn't. It's tempting to stash a less-than-yummy meal in the freezer, but that results in a freezer full of food that doesn't get eaten.

    It's gotta be tasty A or A+ stuff to be worthy of freezing. Food that gets a B or C grade needs to be consumed, not frozen.

    The gal who works with me says her 80something mother in law has 3 freezers in her basement full of stale buns and other dribs and drabs of food. If she can't eat that last 1/2 cup of corn, it goes in the freezer. The second floor of her house is also full of staples that are going stale. If the kids try to slow down her buying or try to clean out the freezers, she gets real resistant and anxious. This is a case of "leftovers gone wild."
    Last edited by IowaGirl; March 9, 2021, 04:59 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • USMCCrashCrew89
    replied
    Leftovers are key in our house. With fast food places charging 8-9 bucks, I’d rather tote in my lunch pail and make my office envious of whatever was for dinner the night before or whatever we prepped for lunches on Sunday.

    Leave a comment:


  • jfmorris
    replied
    We eat leftovers more at my house than not - we always cook enough to eat for 2-3 days when it comes to dinners. My kids grew up eating like that too. Recently we were cooking burgers for some of the kids, and I was requested by my wife to make sure I made enough for several days. We ate smash burgers and leftover smash burgers for a couple of days, and on the 3rd day I turned the last dozen into some pretty tasty chili that we ate for 2 days.

    I have a sister in law who won’t touch ANYTHING leftover - and therefore neither will her two daughters. They throw it out or send it home with someone else. There is also an anti mayonnaise fetish where she hates mayo and gags at the smell (at age 62!), and her grown daughters hate it too because of it. Wierd. Oh, and don’t get me started on their inability to eat bone-in chicken or turkey.

    My opinion is that most of this hating on leftovers is entirely mental. To me, if you preserve the food and reheat it properly, and don’t just nuke it and dry it out, it can taste quite good as leftovers.

    I feel the main exceptions are fish/seafood, which doesn’t keep well, or fried foods. It’s hard to reheat fried stuff and have it crispy again. I’ve got one wing recipe that reheats well - some twice fried Korean style wings.
    Last edited by jfmorris; March 9, 2021, 08:07 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • IowaGirl
    commented on 's reply
    I hear ya, FireMan. It's hard cooking for one, specially when you're used to a spouse or family being around. In the years after I was divorced, I got into some real bad habits around eating and cooking. One was not cooking at all -- just snacking or going hungry. I broke myself of that, but then I found myself cleaning up at the same time I was eating. I made myself stop, sit down, and pay attention to my food. Music helped. Or a good book. But I got to really hate eating alone.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
Working...
X
false
0
Guest
500
["pitmaster-my-membership","login","join-pitmaster","lostpw","reset-password","special-offers","help","nojs","meat-ups","gifts","authaau-alpha","ebooklogin-start","alpha","start"]
false
false
{"count":0,"link":"/forum/announcements/","debug":""}
Yes
Rubs Promo

Spotlight

These are not paid placements, they are a curated selection of reviewed products.

All of the products below have been tested and are highly recommended. Click here to read more about our review process.

Use Our Links To Help Keep Us Alive

Many merchants pay us a small referral fee when you click our links and purchase from them. This has zero impact on the price you pay, but has a major impact on our ability to maintain and improve this site so please click our buy now buttons on product reviews!


The Pit Barrel Cooker May Be Too Easy


The PBC has a rabid cult following for good reason. Its among the best bargains for a smoker in the world. This baby cooks circles around cheap offset smokers because temperature control is so much easier. Click here to read our detailed review and the raves from people who own them.


Amp Up Your Outdoor Cooking Game By Joining The Pitmaster Club

AmazingRibs.com Pitmaster Club
Now the largest membership-based BBQ and grilling community in the world, the Pitmaster Club is sure to step up your outdoor cooking game. Experience the countless benefits from monthly giveaways, to free products, to exclusive content, and more by signing up for a 30-day free trial below! Get a free 30-day trial here.


BBQ And Grilling Gifts For Every Occasion


Looking for the perfect gift for the BBQ and grilling enthusiasts in your life? Heres our suggestion for platinum and gold medal-winning products at a variety of price points. Click here to see our list of Gold Medal Gifts.


The Good-One Is A Superb Grill And A Superb Smoker All In One


The Good-One Open Range is dramatically different from a traditional offset smoker, placing the heat source behind and under the smokebox instead of off to the side. Click here to read our complete review.