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Fritessaus - Netherlands Mayo

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    Fritessaus - Netherlands Mayo

    All of this great discussion over hot dogs and mayo reminded me of my favorite mayo. In Amsterdam and all over the Netherlands, fritessaus is the preferred condiment on French fries. It is amazingly tasty, and markedly different than commercial U.S. mayo. I thought I'd look up what made it different. It looks like the difference is the addition of a vinegar, different types of oil, and the absence of sugar which is usually in U.S. commercial recipes.

    Fritessaus or frietsaus ("fries sauce") is a Dutch accompaniment to French fries, served popularly nationwide.[1] It is similar to mayonnaise, but with at most 25% fat, is leaner and usually sweeter than mayonnaise.[2] Mayonnaise in the Netherlands is required by the Warenwet (Wares law) of 1998 to contain at least 70% fat and at least 5% egg yolk before it may be called mayonnaise.[3]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fritessaus

    Recipes:

    https://arrisje.com/homemade-dutch-m...se-fritessaus/

    https://www.hwcmagazine.com/recipe/v...nd-zesty-mayo/

    https://www.thespruceeats.com/homema...nnaise-1128967


    I compared all three sites against this Serious Eats recipe, and the different ingredients included sunflower oil or olive oil compared to vegetable, and white wine vinegar, so that tends to make sense.

    Compare to this homemade Serious Eats recipe, for what I assume is a typical U.S. quality homemade mayo.

    https://www.seriouseats.com/two-minute-mayonnaise

    I understand there are still more variations with Belgian and German mayo, but all tend to be bit more tart. I also read this is closer to the revered Duke's in the United States.

    Does anyone else want to share what makes for an ideal Dutch or European mayo?




    #2

    Comment


      #3
      Elton's BBQ ? 😃

      Comment


      #4
      This is interesting... after having spent a decent portion of my life in Europe (mainly the England and Germany) I really prefer mayo or gravy to ketchup on fries and some other things.

      I don't recall German mayo being too different to US mayo, but I was a LOT younger when I lived there. UK mayo was comparable to Hellmans or whatever.

      Comment


        #5
        In Germany, when I was stationed there in the 1980’s, you could get french fries in a paper cone with ketchup, mayo, and emmentaler cheese from pretty much all the street side food vendors. When I traveled back in the 1990’s, that was still the case. So, considering how slowly things change in German culture, I am guessing that you can still get Pommes Frites mit kaese from most street food vendors

        I always tried to have the mayo left off, LOL

        Comment


        • ecowper
          ecowper commented
          Editing a comment
          Murdy and schitzel sandwiches!

        • Murdy
          Murdy commented
          Editing a comment
          And I just remembered Frickedelle. Not sure about the spelling. They were those hybrid meatloaf / burgers.

        • holehogg
          holehogg commented
          Editing a comment
          Murdy There is a German Gent - Gunter (still with a thick accent) who has been serving up German treats from his "wurstwagon" at the beach each weekend and has been more than 35 years.
          Had me a currywurst every Sunday for 5 years while the 2 kids were busy with "Nippers" (beach life saving). Havent been for a few years but he is still operating from the same place.
          Frikkadels are a South African traditional treat very similar to a Frikandel and enjoyed by us at least twice a month.

        #6
        Here you go: https://www.amazon.com/Remia-Frites-...1674636&sr=8-3

        Comment


          #7
          Interesting. I might give it try the next time I eat a hot dog

          Comment


            #8
            Interesting about the mayo. I like mayo but never throught it about it on my fries. Frank's buffalo sauce is my go to. I remember eating vinegar with my fries when I was in the UK many moons ago and enjoyed that.

            Comment


            • ItsAllGoneToTheDogs
              ItsAllGoneToTheDogs commented
              Editing a comment
              Mayo is my go to with fries. Or malt vinegar. The best fast food fries to eat with mayo only are Chick-fil-a's waffle fries or Arbys curly fries.

            • Mr. Bones
              Mr. Bones commented
              Editing a comment
              Try both, together...
              Serious...
              Lil dip o Duke's, then a drizzle of Frank's...

              Please, report back, with some Science...

              Love it? Hate it? LMK, pls...

              Vinegar is always a good pairin with taters inherent starchiness...reckon th Frank's has dat adequately covered

            • Mr. Bones
              Mr. Bones commented
              Editing a comment
              ItsAllGoneToTheDogs Malt Vinegar is, indeed, a PRO Move, Brother!
              I enjoy it very much, on both fried taters, an breaded fish...

            #9
            Hail yeah...

            Lotsa places I ever lived, overseas, mayo was th thing, on fries...

            Let's have an ingredient breakdown of Kewpie, both versions...please
            Last edited by Mr. Bones; September 14, 2021, 09:12 PM. Reason: depluralized

            Comment


            • Mr. Bones
              Mr. Bones commented
              Editing a comment
              Anybody have a personal comparative analysis betwixt US an Japanese versions of Kewpie Mayos?

              Help a Brother out, if so, Please.

            • Bkhuna
              Bkhuna commented
              Editing a comment
              Mr. Bones - I buy the Japanese made Kewpie. After how horribly awful my favorite Japanese beers tasted when the moved their production to the US and Canada, I'm not about to even try the US version. I also understand that they dropped the MSG in the US version.

              Kewpie is made with egg yolks only instead of whole eggs. Creamier I think.
              Duke's and Kewpie are the two mayo's I keep on hand. I use Kewpie for Japanese dishes that uses mayo but it's also good on a tomato sandwich or potato salad.

            • Bkhuna
              Bkhuna commented
              Editing a comment
              Mr. Bones - And tuna sandwiches. Something about the extra umami in Kewpie I suppose.

            #10
            I'm not quite sure if European Mayo is any different than American Mayo, but homemade is far better than storebought mayo.
            Well Ladies & Gent's this is the mayo recipe i use;
            2 pcs. egg yolk
            0.5 tsp salt
            1 tablespoon lemon juice or white wine vinegar
            1 teaspoon dijon mustard
            about. 4 dl neutral oil (1,6cup ish)
            0.25 teaspoon ground pepper

            Stir egg yolks with salt until light and thick. Add spices and half of the lemon juice / vinegar.

            Dilute gently with oil while continuing to whisk - one teaspoon at a time is enough. Gradually increase the amount of oil. Make sure that the mayonnaise is always smooth and shiny. If it becomes thinner, there is a danger that it will separate. You can save the mayonnaise by adding a little water before continuing to dilute, or do not add the rest of the oil.

            Season with spices and lemon / vinegar until prefeared taste..

            Found a YT video that seems to be quite spot on as i remember it..

            How to Make Frietje Met: Dutch Fries with Homemade Fries Sauce

            Comment


              #11
              Had this the other day..
              kielbasa with fries.. with curryketchup and mayo.. sprinkeled with chopped red onion.
              Click image for larger version

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              Comment


                #12
                I'm wondering how much "our" (RSA) commercial mayo compares with the Dutch type. Definitely has a vinegar identity.
                Until tasting Hellmans mayo after being influenced by the Pit (wasn't prepared AD - AR to fork out 3 x as much for Hellmans) I have convinced myself our mayo is more miracle whip than mayo (?). I prefer Hellmans now but the rest of the family do not like.
                Never been a tomato sauce or ketchup fan and love sharing my fries with mayo. Most people I know are big on the red stuff but mayo is also widely used.

                FWIW the ingredients of the mayo we buy. The different brands taste much of a much to me so assume the ingrd are very similar.

                Click image for larger version

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                Comment


                • IFindZeroBadCooks
                  IFindZeroBadCooks commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Can I just say your avatar is one of my favorites here at the Pit? Amuses me no end every time.

                #13
                I am definitely going to make some of these Mayo recipes!

                I wonder how much difference there is between Kewpie and Dutch Mayo…

                Comment


                • Bkhuna
                  Bkhuna commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I bought a bottle of some Remia Fritessaus from The Netherlands. Doesn't even taste like Mayonnaise.

                  It's 24% canola oil. The second ingredient is glucose-fructose syrup. Then they add more sugar . Eggs are down at the bottom is the label along with all the chemicals.

                  This stuff tastes awful. I didn't think anything could be worse than miracle whip but this company has done it. It's so bad I may have to sneak it into someone else's garbage can.

                • IFindZeroBadCooks
                  IFindZeroBadCooks commented
                  Editing a comment
                  That sounds awful Bkhuna . I am sorry it didn’t work out for you. That also sounds like nowhere near authentic Dutch Mayo. I will let you know when I make some myself but the recipes here look much closer and should be better.

                #14
                IFindZeroBadCooks

                This is the stuff I bought
                Click image for larger version  Name:	fritessauce 1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	84.7 KB ID:	1098478 Click image for larger version  Name:	fritessauce 2.jpg Views:	0 Size:	286.5 KB ID:	1098479
                Last edited by Bkhuna; September 22, 2021, 07:10 AM.

                Comment


                • IFindZeroBadCooks
                  IFindZeroBadCooks commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Will definitely avoid!

                • BarbecueBob
                  BarbecueBob commented
                  Editing a comment
                  As a Dutchman, albeit away from home for quite a few years now in bonny Scotland, this Remia Frietsaus is probably the most popular sauce on fries/chips. It is not a mayonnaise and cannot be called mayonnaise. According to Dutch food laws, mayonnaise must contain at least 70% fat (oil) and at least 5% egg yolk.

                • BarbecueBob
                  BarbecueBob commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Frietsaus has between 25-35% fat but more sugar and other stuff is added for taste - the ingredients are not controlled by any food laws. Despite more sugar the calorie content in frietsaus is less and therefore considered to be a "healthier" option. The Dutch love their frietsaus and you will probably have seen they are trying to drown their fries in the stuff.
                  I still love the stuff but have not had it for a few years.

                #15
                I have had this! In Amsterdam, actually. (Prior to the current state of things, I found myself going to Amsterdam for a conference every July.)

                My recollections are a little fuzzy, but I do remember it being different than common American mayo. Sweeter and slightly tangy is what I remember.

                Also, the first time I encountered it was when the convention staff brought out a "Nacho Bar" for snacks. It consisted of tortilla chips and four condiments in which to dip them: cheese, ketchup, mustard, and their mayo. Wild.

                Comment

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