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'Ribeye cap' Cook rolled up with string, or unroll and hot grill?

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    'Ribeye cap' Cook rolled up with string, or unroll and hot grill?

    Looking for advice, recommendations. I have always loved the ribeye cap (spinalis dorsi), and have purchased them from Costco. Costco sells them rolled and tied. In the past I have unrolled them, salt and pepper, and grilled hot, like one would for a skirt steak. I know you can also cook them rolled, using indirect (or oven) to about 105F internal, then reverse sear. I haven't tried that yet, wondering if it's worth the loss of surface area for mailliard reaction offered by the individual thinner strips.
    So, I'm looking for members' opinions, experiences. Especially hoping for feedback by Ernest, Huskee, Spinnaker, jfmorris, Richard Chrz and many more whose grilling I appreciate.

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    Last edited by Dr. Pepper; February 18, 2021, 04:02 PM.

    #2
    It looks like they are about 8 ounces each. Personally, I'd keep them rolled and cook hot and fast flipping repeatedly in a cast iron skillet.

    Comment


      #3
      They roll and tie for a reason....cook them that way.

      Comment


      • jfmorris
        jfmorris commented
        Editing a comment
        As long as he cooks these blade-ruinated rolls of beef to 145F per the fine print. I hate how Costco ruins prime beef and causes risk of food poisoning due to their blade tenderizing machine.

      #4
      I stopped buying these after I read the small print that indicated that these are blade tenderized and need to be cooked to 145°.

      Comment


      • jfmorris
        jfmorris commented
        Editing a comment
        That is why I only buy brisket and pork belly at Costco. I would also buy the sub primal like a full NY strip loin or a full ribeye, and cut it into steaks.

      #5
      Personally, I've never cooked this particular cut of beef. My main concern with this is that it is blade tenderized - my pet peeve with Costco. That means its been Jacard blade tenderized by running it through a machine that stabs it with hundreds of tiny blades. This shoves contaminants into the meat. The question is - did they do that BEFORE or AFTER they rolled and tied it? It makes a difference. I don't care how clean their prep area is at Costco, I just don't like the idea of surface contaminants being in the middle of that roll, if it was done before rolling it up.

      So that puts me in the camp of unrolling it, grilling hot and fast like I would a flank or skirt steak, and getting the IT a little hotter than you might like. They say cook it to an IT of a minimum of 145 on that label *because* they blade tenderized it. Better safe than sorry...

      I was at Costco at 10:30am this morning, browsing the beef, and almost left with some flank steaks and brisket, but decided I have enough meat in the freezer already - plus I need to do a freezer dive and inventory. Sadly, even CHUCK roasts were blade tenderized - but I cook those to 203 anyway for pulling. I saw some prime tenderloin and filets that were not blade tenderized, and their flank was not tenderized. None of the sub primal cuts were either. Everything else was. I was tempted to get a prime NY strip and cut it into steaks myself, but left with nothing except fruit and vegetables today.

      Comment


        #6
        I usually keep them rolled up when I grill them.

        Although, you can untie them and cook those strips hot and fast. That is also a great way to do it, but you need to keep flipping in order to keep the flames from burning the meat. It can be tough with a bunch of different caps going, but it is fun, and you get a a lot of browning. Keep in mind: they can break up into smaller pieces, so sometimes it is more trouble than it is worth.

        This is my favorite cut of beef. They are incredible. I am not sure they actually tenderize them with blades where I get them cause I have never seen that on the label. If its on the label then I guess they do. There really is no need to do so as they are already very tender and packed with flavor.

        Comment


        • HawkerXP
          HawkerXP commented
          Editing a comment
          really small print on Costco label.

        #7
        There's enough fat that 145 doesn't totally ruin things. I still prefer to just lay out in strips and cook as hot as I can.

        Comment


          #8
          Thanks, everyone. I've learned something today: I had never heard of blade tenderizing, and only today looked closer and see that on the label. Because of that, I will follow my prior methods of unrolling, salt and pepper, then cook over wood fire hot and fast with frequent turning. You have to move the meat a lot anyways, since the fat flares up. And, my wife prefers med rare to medium, plus as noted by Jerod Broussard, they are juicy as can be even at medium.
          Last edited by Dr. Pepper; February 19, 2021, 12:38 AM.

          Comment


            #9
            Dr. Pepper I never would have known the risks of blade tenderized meat until a few years ago. I sure know a lot more about it and food safety in general since joining the AR Pitmaster club!

            Comment


              #10
              This is a post I did from 12/22/19. This is one way to enjoy his cut and not have to worry about blade tenderizing.

              December 22, 2019, 10:15 AM
              Here's one of my favorite things to cook. Whole ribeye cap. I bought a whole primal cut prime ribeye from Costco awhile back and separated the cap from the eye, trim it up and rolled and tied it and into the freezer. After thawing, I untied it and dry brined for several hours in the frig. (1/2 tsp kosher salt per lb. of meat) I set up the BGE with the AR rig and put the grill gates, smooth side up down low, to sear on later. Rub the cap with Worcestershire and seasoned with Oakridge BBQ's Spogos, a little spray of duck fat and cooked @ 300 for about 30 minutes, flipping several times. I then pulled it about 120, sprayed a little duck fat on the grill gates and got the fire roaring. Decided to put a little Oakridge BBQ's Carne Crosta on the meat before searing.
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              Last edited by wrgilb; February 19, 2021, 11:14 PM.

              Comment


              • SmokingSteve
                SmokingSteve commented
                Editing a comment
                Must have been a female duck, if it was a male duck you would have been neutering the duck fat!

              • wrgilb
                wrgilb commented
                Editing a comment
                SmokingSteve Good one. Spell check got me again.

              • SmokingSteve
                SmokingSteve commented
                Editing a comment
                All kidding aside, looks great! I am jealous!

              #11
              In a pinch you can still have safe med rare blade tenderized steaks if you pasteurize using SV. But it’s still stupid and I wish They would stop ruining the integrity of good meat.

              Comment


                #12
                I cook them rolled. Salt, sous vide at 131 for 2 - 3 hours. Pat dry, rub with ghee, season with course black pepper, sear in a dry cast iron skillet. When it's seared, place a dab of butter on it while I slice. Let that butter melt into all the nooks

                Comment


                • Dr. Pepper
                  Dr. Pepper commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Thanks, Ernest. If you ever get the chance, I'd like to see some photos of one of your ribeye cap cooks.
                  Daniel

                #13
                I would do it as per many of the posts above. Hot skillet or grill grates and keep flippin. There would be a lot of meat loss during cooking as I would be doin a lot of testing.... Pitmasters privilege

                Comment


                  #14
                  I keep mine rolled

                  Comment


                    #15
                    I am definitely with jfmorris when it comes to Costco "blade tenderizing" these type of cuts, there really is no need but you want your cooked meat to be safe for your family.

                    We have also been using a FoodSaver for years (on our third one) and when we write on the bag what is inside we write it on the area on the end you will cut off. Wash and dry the bag and it is ready to be used again.

                    Comment


                    • Dr. Pepper
                      Dr. Pepper commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I started to wash and reuse my FoodSaver bags as well. Less plastic waste. Every once in a while a lamb chop will pierce the bag, & you have to toss.

                    • jfmorris
                      jfmorris commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I've never ever thought of reusing a FoodSaver bag... I'll have to ponder my ability to wash them and use them for something smaller than the original contents.

                    • Dr. Pepper
                      Dr. Pepper commented
                      Editing a comment
                      jfmorris If you cut them longer than needed, then you lose about 3 cm each time you cut off the top. For example, frozen Costco whole Pecans: I put them in a long vacuum bag, and when we cut off the end, remove 1 or 2 cups depending on the recipe, then re-vacuum/seal before they have a chance to thaw. I used to make multiple small bags, no longer. (The only problem is my wife hates them hanging around in the sink if I am letting a greasy bag sit with hot sudsy water inside.)

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