Welcome!


This is a membership forum. As a guest, you can click around a bit. View 5 pages for free. If you would like to participate, please join.

[ Pitmaster Club Information | Join Now | Login | Contact Us ]

There are 4 page views remaining.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cooking Dry Aged Steak - Techniques/Tips?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Cooking Dry Aged Steak - Techniques/Tips?

    I have a celebration coming up, and I've got a few dry aged bone-in ribeyes from Snake River Farms headed my way. I've never cooked a dry aged steak.

    What differences can I expect in the cook?

    My usual method with a thick ribeye is to sous vide and throw in a blazing hot cast iron skillet with some beef tallow, and a Searzall butane torch on the top side. Any reason that's not a good idea with a dry aged steak?

    I'm not looking to debate general steak cooking methods - just looking for input from those who know of differences to look out for with a dry aged steak, or any reason this method is specifically sub-optimal for dry aged meat.

    Thanks!

    #2
    Great question, I'll be following. My friend/butcher is dry aging a couple of rib roasts for us for Christmas. He covers them completely with butter and they've been hanging in his walk-in since August. It sounds preposterous but he does this a couple of times a year and says the steaks are amazing!

    Comment


    • Spinaker
      Spinaker commented
      Editing a comment
      See below, this is how I do my 65-day dry-aged Prime ribs every Xmas.

    #3
    I would trim off the funky, dry-aged gold. That stuff is nothing short of fatty gold and not something you wanna waste.

    Take the trimmed up fat, cube it up and let it render in a small pan under low heat. Take the rendered fat, aka Beef Love, and save it for the end of the cook. Brush the rendered fat over the meat after you sear the meat and you will have a rich, tasty and perfectly seared piece of meat. I do it every year when I make a 65-day dry-aged prime rib. The boost in flavor is outstanding. You can even add some rosemary and garlic to the pan as well if that is your cup of fat.

    In my opinion, it is much better to utilize that fatty gold and turn it into liquid beef love. Rather then let it curl up into gristle on the steak, that many tend to trim off anyway before they eat it.

    Now I pre-sear this prime rib because I cook it sous vide. but the fat in the pan is the rendered fat. I trim up this prime rib so that all the surface fat is almost removed, so I get as much of that fatty gold as I can.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	875DCC7D-2269-473B-804A-F0E56DCA5F95.jpg
Views:	104
Size:	124.7 KB
ID:	938584Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_6521.jpeg
Views:	193
Size:	123.9 KB
ID:	938583
    Last edited by Spinaker; November 12, 2020, 04:52 PM.

    Comment


    • CaliforniaDad
      CaliforniaDad commented
      Editing a comment
      Troutman - any chance you've done a writeup on what you do to a chuck using SV? I have not really found a way I like chuck SV, so I usually just end up smoking for a couple of hours and then braising until it's shred-able. My attempts to make something slice-able have not worked well (granted, I usually am using Choice and not Prime).

    • Troutman
      Troutman commented
      Editing a comment
      CaliforniaDad There are a lot of write-ups about SVQ and QVQ Chuckies here. One I particularly like is linked here;

      https://pitmaster.amazingribs.com/fo...s-vide-chuckie

      ..however as I opined in the post I don't sous-vide that long. I go about 25-30 hours tops at 130* bath temp. The whole idea is to do a medium rare chuck. There's also a sliceable option to go 165* bath temp for a more well done version.

    • CaliforniaDad
      CaliforniaDad commented
      Editing a comment
      Troutman - Thanks! I've done sous vide longer than I've done smoking, and I've still not figured out how to integrate the two well (not enough smoke flavor). Dumb me - I've never smoked *before* the bath.

      Do you integrate a smoke step for pastrami prior to the bath? I've done both "traditional" and SVQ, but I've been far happier with the smoke flavor of the traditional, but maybe smoking the corned beef before the bath? Is that the thing?

    #4
    dry age my own but rarely do I go over 28 days. Don't like the results of longer aging personally. And to answer your question its the same cooking technique you use on your fresh meat. Remember even fresh meat is wet aged for 30 days or longer. Just know this, depending on the length of aging, the meat gets very dense from moisture lose. That's what intensifies flavor. Bottom line be careful to not overcook.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Image2.jpg
Views:	116
Size:	91.4 KB
ID:	938592
    Last edited by Troutman; November 12, 2020, 05:00 PM.

    Comment


      #5
      no difference in cooking method and i'd assume that SRF has trimmed off anything that was meant to be trimmed. the only preparation-related difference i've heard is that there is less quality degradation from freezing because of the lower moisture content. Even then, my experience is you'll still have a decent amount of moisture in bag if you sous vide so you'll still have to dry off / crank up heat to get a good sear.

      Comment


        #6
        I would just cook it like you would most any other steak. Since they are thicker cuts I would reverse sear them.

        Here is a comparison I did with a couple dry aged steaks including a Snake River dry aged ribeye. Reverse seared them on the SNS Kettle. Spoiler alert: I preferred the 30 day dry aged SRF steak to the other 60 day dry aged one.

        Comment


        • CaliforniaDad
          CaliforniaDad commented
          Editing a comment
          Interesting vid, thanks! I've got 45-day incoming; maybe splitting the difference?

        #7
        +1 on cooking them no differently. Our local butcher who was dry aging found that beef jerky was more profitable and so I'm going to either start doing it myself or ordering it.

        Comment


          #8
          +2 on no different cooking methods. Use your thermometer! At my old job, we did 30, 45, 60 day dry age. I preferred the 30 best of all. Any trim we had went into dry age burgers. Pure heaven!

          Comment


          • Spinaker
            Spinaker commented
            Editing a comment
            Dude! Dry-aged burgers? Heck yes!

          • Troutman
            Troutman commented
            Editing a comment
            Dude? +1 on the 28-30 day aging, my sweet spot for sure !!

        Announcement

        Collapse
        No announcement yet.
        Working...
        X
        false
        0
        Guest
        500
        ["pitmaster-my-membership","login","join-pitmaster","lostpw","reset-password","special-offers","help","nojs","meat-ups","gifts","authaau-alpha","ebooklogin-start","alpha","start"]
        false
        false
        {"count":0,"link":"/forum/announcements/","debug":""}
        Yes
        Rubs Promo
        Meat-Up in Memphis