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Adjusting cook time for grass-fed

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    Adjusting cook time for grass-fed

    Stopped by the butcher shop tonight to pick up some more meat and he threw in a half slab of grass-fed, boneless short rib for me to try out. It's Australian wagyu, if that makes any difference. I know I have to reduce the cook time, but by how much? I read one article that mentioned 20-30% less time. So for a 5-hour initial cook it would be reduced to 3.5-4 hours. How do you guys adjust your time for grass-fed?

    #2
    Grass fed and wagyu seem contradictory to me. There must have been some grain feeding in there to get the proper marbling. Cook to 203. How thick are they? That's a big factor in short rib cookin.

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      #3
      I agree with Pit Boss, go by temp, whether it's 1.5 hrs or 3. Wagyu might not need as high of a finished temp, you may be ok pulling it at 190. Hard to say I've never cooked Wagyu anything, but I know the extra intramuscular fat transfers heat faster and it will cook quicker. Whatever finished temp you choose, a good hold like you would with a brisket should still be done before digging in.

      Austrailian Wagyu Association's website says the marbling comes from both bloodline and diet, and they can be grass fed and still develop considerable marbling, but most are fed carefully designated rations of straw for roughage, and grain for protein and carbohydrates.

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        #4
        It's late here on the west coast so you guys are up laaaate. Hmm, I was hoping to cook this with my usual slabs of short ribs but just stick it in the smoker at a later time. But you guys are saying the proper way to cook is to reduce the temp.

        I wanted to do an informal taste test with 3 different "grades"—choice (Harris Ranch), prime (Creekstone Farms), and wagyu (Australian Agricultural).
        Last edited by eugenek; December 6, 2014, 01:41 AM.

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          #5
          Originally posted by eugenek View Post
          It's late here on the west coast so you guys are up laaaate. Hmm, I was hoping to cook this with my usual slabs of short ribs but just stick it in the smoker at a later time. But you guys are saying the proper way to cook is to reduce the temp.
          No, cook AT same temp as your other ribs. Treat them like your other short ribs. You can start them the same time, but beware they may finish quicker (as measured with a temp probe). If so, hold them wrapped in foil & towels in a faux cambro as you would a brisket. They can be taken to 203 or they may be fine when they hit 190 since they're Wagyu.

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            #6
            Ok, gotcha, same cook temp. But sorry, it's not making sense to me. Wouldn't a shorter cook time prevent it from finishing quicker though? Thanks.

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              #7
              By shorter cook time I don't mean the smoker I mean the meat. The Wagyu needs less time to reach doneness, especially since it's boneless. So if you start all sets of ribs at the same time, and cook them together, the Wagyu ones should be done sooner. IF that is the case, pull them off (faux cambro 'em) and keep cooking the others until they're done, as measured with a thermometer probe. Hypothetically speaking- the short ribs (with bone) may need 5+ hours, the boneless may only need 2 or 3, as an estimate, I don't know exactly never cooked boneless Wagyu ribs.

              This is what I would do: Put a probe in one of the thickest chunks of meat on the regular short ribs, and one in the Wagyu pieces, try to stay centered away from bone. Cooke them at 225, or whatever you were planning to cook them at. Cook each kind of ribs until they reach about 195-205. Pull them, wrap them in foil and towels and hold in a cambro for an hour or two, like you would a brisket.
              Last edited by Huskee; December 6, 2014, 05:25 AM.

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                #8
                Huskee, really appreciate the detailed explanation—helps me piece things together. I think what you're saying is instead of guessing on the time required for the boneless short rib to cook and just throwing it in the smoker later, I should more confidently cook until the meat's temp is done (195-225). Then I can use the faux cambro method to keep it warm until the others are ready.

                Didn't make sense because 1) I don't regularly track the meat temp and 2) I didn't know what "faux cambro" was, lol. I just received the Auber auto thermometer yesterday so it'll free up the iGrill mini for meat. Thanks!

                Just found the link for Meathead's article on faux cambro: http://amazingribs.com/tips_and_tech...ux_cambro.html
                Last edited by eugenek; December 6, 2014, 09:14 AM.

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                  #9
                  Eugenek, if anyone accuses you of buying cheap beef, just slap 'em!!!!

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                    #10
                    Thanks, uh, wait a second… So far I've shopped with 3 butchers and they've charged up in the teens per pound. My current one is charging $8.99 for choice and $10.99 for prime (which I don't think is necessary but it's all they had). I bought from my local supermarket chain when I first started and it was a messy cut that was something like $4.99. The difference in quality is pretty stark. Why does short rib have to be so expensive?

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                      #11
                      No clue other than supply and demand. Short ribs out here are not much better than a pile of crap.

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                        #12
                        Haha ouch, different strokes for different folks, I guess. It's what turned me on to smoking. Is it the taste or the perception of it being a junk cut to barbecuers? I wish I could serve you up a plate!

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                          #13
                          Oh I would like 'em. It's just the ones they have in the stores here are bottom of the barrel Select grade. Better off braising them things for about 5-6 hours.

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                            #14
                            Ah yeah… Here's a pic from from my very first attempt. This wasn't a slab but separate ribs that were like 5" in length. I don't do that sauce on them anymore, either. It was terribly fatty and really uneven. Lots of flavor from what I remember, but you had to pick the meat out.

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                              #15
                              Good color. Yes, the ones here are individual ribs. One day I will get a high grade rack to hang in the PBC. I've done back ribs a few times. They OK....I really need to go longer when I wrap them.

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