Welcome!


This is a membership forum. As a guest, you can click around a bit. View 5 pages for free. If you would like to participate, please join.

[ Pitmaster Club Information | Join Now | Login | Contact Us ]

There are 4 page views remaining.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Day before cook?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Day before cook?

    So I am planning on taking the smoker out next weekend for a little fall fiesta I am having at my house. However, I have a predicament. While, I would love to sit by the smoker all day with the boys and some beers, this is the type of party where I may have some real hosting obligations including chasing around kids and hanging with some folks I haven't seen in a while. I took the day before the party off in hopes that I can do the smoking then. I know there are some do's and don'ts on this topic and I apologize if it has been discussed before. I tried searching for a good explanation in the forum but gave up after a while. My question is: Can I cook a brisket 1 day before I serve it and still maintain quality flavor and texture? I have rarely had the chance to do a full 10+ hour cook and doing it the day before my party would really allow me to get it done the right way and give it my full attention without having to start at 2-3 am which could have me exhausted by the time my company gets here (credit to those who can do that) Where I am from, I wonder what my neighbors would think if they saw smoke coming out of my back yard at 2-3 am. We'll find out another day. My go-to is normally ribs because of the lesser cook time and being easier to manage for me while having company over but I would really like to change it up this time. I'd appreciate any feedback on this topic. I'd love to serve the brisket unless doing so 18 hours after I take it off the smoker is going to influence it in a bad way. Also, if it is okay to do this, I would love to be able to re-heat it in the smoker since it would be really nice to have my smoker going during the party but not have to give it so much attention. If that isn't a good idea how should I re-heat it? I plan on doing a pork butt as well but I am assuming pulled pork is a lot less sensitive to the re-heat. Thanks for your help

    #2
    I have become a sous vide acolyte for this kind of cook. QVQ or SVQ are great ways to accomplish this with predictable timing and results.

    I have not done a cook-the-day-before and reheat a brisket, but many have and will chime in shortly. Sounds like a nice party coming up!

    Comment


    • FrankC
      FrankC commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks!

    #3
    For the pork butt, overnight, 20hrs, plus rest.
    How to Smoke a Pork Butt (AKA Pork Shoulder) - YouTube
    For brisket overnight
    The Weekday Brisket - How to smoke a brisket during the week. From work! - YouTube
    Do both low and slow, same temp same timing.
    Note that is the Beauty of a Pellet Grill.

    Happy grilling to you and PBR too

    Comment


      #4
      You sure can. I did one a couple months ago for a grad party where they wnated to eat at 4pm (I'm not getting up at 3am to cook straight through, sorry).

      Here's a link to the "Wozniak Way" to cook today & serve tomorrow: https://amazingribs.com/more-techniq...w-wozniak-way/

      I did very similar to the link with a couple key differences- I cooked it at my typical low & slow temps (250ish), wrapped in paper at ~180, after the stall (my personal preference), and did the 1-2hr faux cambro hold phase after it hit 200ish. My other difference was after it was done I let it come down to room temp on the counter, then into the fridge (I did not bag it and ice-bath it). I did reheat it as described in the article, except I discarded the paper and wrapped it in foil for the reheat, then when it hit serving temp I undid the foil and let that top bark firm up for about 30 min or so still in the hot oven (or smoker, no difference at this point). I don't care about the bottom "bark", which in my case was the fat cap, it's on the cutting board in the juices anyway.

      It was outstanding and I'd 100% do it again.

      Comment


      • FrankC
        FrankC commented
        Editing a comment
        Great. Ill check that out. Thank you!

      #5
      What sort of smoker are you using?

      Comment


      • FrankC
        FrankC commented
        Editing a comment
        Lang 36

      • Murdy
        Murdy commented
        Editing a comment
        I'm jealous

      #6
      Never done brisket so I can’t help with that. Pulled pork I have done the day before a few times and it was great. Only advice I can give with that is to not shred until right before you want to serve it. You can reheat in your smoker; I have. I’ve also used my oven as well. I guess it depends on how big of a butt you’ve got and the type of smoker you have. The last butt I did I ended up doing it the same day I served it because it was small enough where I could do it.

      Comment


      • FrankC
        FrankC commented
        Editing a comment
        Sounds good. Thank you!

      #7
      Following to learn...

      Comment


        #8
        No problem with your plan. While many of us have gone the SV route for situations like this, but you can just cook ahead, wrap as airtight as you can, ice bath if you have a big enough bag, and then reheat and hold until ready to serve. My only caveat is to warn not to be tempted to slice and then reheat the slices. Keep it whole throughout the process and then slice when serving.

        Comment


        • FrankC
          FrankC commented
          Editing a comment
          Got it. Thank you!

        #9
        I will have to try the "Wozniak Way." I have held a brisket in the oven at 170 (as low as mine will go) for many hours prior to going to a cooler for the rest the next morning. The brisket was wrapped in foil, and the result was good.

        Comment


          #10
          I've done a handful of briskets for reheat and eat this way. Smoke your brisket up to a week before and freeze it. To serve, take a long slicing knife and cut your slices by just using downward pressure on both ends of the knife and it will cut right through (no back and forth motion). Place slices in a large disposable aluminum roasting pan and add a little beef broth. Cover with aluminum foil and place in oven at 200-225 degrees for about 15 -20 minutes until warmed through then serve as usual.

          Comment


            #11
            I’m having my work team over on Saturday. Here is what I’m doing:

            Thursday - I spatchcocked two chickens. They will brine for 24 hours in a 5% salt, 3% sugar brine.

            Friday - noon- trim prime brisket. Smoke for 10- 12 hours. foil boat at 170* or so. Finish smoking. Rest brisket until 180* then into 160* oven. Will hold in oven until 6:00pm on Saturday. Yes, I’m resting the brisket for 18 hours.

            Baked beans on with the brisket for 6 hours. Beans are cooked with bacon liquor - other stuff too but the bacon liquor is a game changer. Once done, will hold in fridge then reheat on Saturday before service.

            chicken out of the brine after 24 hours, rinsed , dried and onto wire wracks for 24 hours in the fridge.

            Saturday. around mid-morning, I will put pork belly burnt ends on smoker. Should be done in about 5 hours. Let cool for a bit once done and then into the oven with the brisket. I will finish on the smoker to glaze the burnt ends before service.

            About the time the guests arrive at 6:00pm, chicken on the smoker for about an hour until breasts are 160*. Let rest while I slice the brisket while guest nibble on pork belly meat candy.

            Not sure if this helps OP but it’s a plan. Wish me luck.


            rob
            Last edited by Rob whatever; September 23, 2021, 07:02 PM.

            Comment


            • FrankC
              FrankC commented
              Editing a comment
              Thats a plan right there. Thanks for the help! Good luck

            #12
            All of the ideas above very sound and diverse. I agree with the premise of not tending to a fire all night long and being expected to be the host of a party. I have tried that too many times. It ruins your fun.

            Comment


              #13
              Personally I would start it at bedtime the night before, with it getting done around noon or so the day of the event, and then you just hold it wrapped in foil in a warm oven or a cooler (faux cambro). I've held brisket for 6-7 hours that way before without problems. That said, I don't know what kind of smoker you have, and if it requires tending. I don't use my offset for overnight cooks anymore - but routinely do it for 8 to 12 hours unattended with my kettle or kamado.

              Comment


              • FrankC
                FrankC commented
                Editing a comment
                Thanks for giving me another reason to buy another cooker!

            Announcement

            Collapse
            No announcement yet.
            Working...
            X
            false
            0
            Guest
            500
            ["pitmaster-my-membership","login","join-pitmaster","lostpw","reset-password","special-offers","help","nojs","meat-ups","gifts","authaau-alpha","ebooklogin-start","alpha","start"]
            false
            false
            {"count":0,"link":"/forum/announcements/","debug":""}
            Yes
            Rubs Promo

            Spotlight

            These are not ads or paid placements. These are some of our favorite tools and toys.

            These are products we have tested, won our top awards, and are highly recommend. Click here to read how we test, about our medals, and what they mean.

            Use Our Links To Help Keep Us Alive

            A big part of this site is our unbiased equipment and product reviews. We love playing with toys and we have no problem calling them the way we see them. Some companies pay a finder’s fee if a reader clicks a link on AmazingRibs.com and buys a product. It has zero impact on our reviews, zero impact on the price you pay, and the sites never tell us what you bought, but it has a major impact on our ability to keep this site alive! So before you buy, please click our links. Here’s a link that takes you to a page on Amazon that has some of our favorite tools and toys: https://tinyurl.com/amazingribs


            Bring The Heat With Broil King Signet’s Dual Tube Burners

            3 burner gas grill

            The Broil King Signet 320 is a modestly priced, 3-burner gas grill that packs a lot of value and power under the hood. Broil King’s proprietary, dual-tube burners get hot fast and are able to achieve high, searing temps that rival most comparatively priced gas grills. The quality cast aluminum housing carries a Limited Lifetime Warranty.

            Click here to read ourcompletereview


            Compact Powerful Sear Machine For Your Next Tailgater


            Char-Broil’s Grill2Go x200 is a super-portable, fun little sizzler made of heavy, rust-proof cast aluminum. The lid snaps shut. Grab the handle and you’re off to the party! Char-Broil’s TRU-Infrared design produces searing heat while reducing fuel consumption. A 16 ounce LP gas canister is enough to keep you flipping burgers for hours.

            Click here to read our detailed review and to order


            GrillGrates Take Gas Grills To The InfraredZone


            GrillGrates(TM) amplify heat, prevent flareups, make flipping foods easier, kill hotspots, flip over to make a fine griddle, and can be easily moved from one grill to another. You can even throw wood chips, pellets, or sawdust between the rails and deliver a quick burst of smoke.

            Click here for more about what makes these grates so special


            The Pit Barrel Cooker May Be Too Easy


            The PBC has a rabid cult following for good reason. It is absolutely positively without a doubt the best bargain on a smoker in the world. Period. This baby will cook circles around the cheap offset sideways barrel smokers because temperature control is so much easier.

            Click here to read our detailed review and the raves from people who own them


            Masterbuilt MPS 340/G ThermoTemp XL Propane Smoker


            This is the first propane smoker with a thermostat, making this baby foolproof. Set ThermoTemp’s dial from 175° to 350°F and the thermostat inside will adjust the burner just like an indoor kitchen oven. All you need to do is add wood to the tray above the burner to start smokin’.

            Click here to read our detailed review


            Blackstone Rangetop Combo: Griddle And Deep Fryer In One


            The flat top does the burgers and the fryer does the fries. Use the griddle for bacon, eggs, grilled cheese, and so much more. And why deep fry indoors when you can avoid the smell and mess by doing it outside!

            Click here to read our detailed review and to order


            Finally, A Great Portable Pellet Smoker

            Green Mountain Grills Trek smoker

            Green Mountain Grills Trek smoker

            Green Mountain’s portable Trek Smoker is one mean tailgating and picnic machine. But it’s also gaining popularity with people who want to add a small, set it and forget it pellet smoker to their backyard arsenal. And with their WiFi capabilities you can control and monitor Trek from your smart phone or laptop.

            Click here to read our detailed review and to order