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My first tri tip

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    My first tri tip

    We don't see tri tip much here in Minnesota. When I have seen it, it has been 10 a pound. Aldi had it for 3.99. I bought three.
    After I bought it I found out it had been bladed, and seasoned. Cooked one sous vide and seared it. Pretty good, but I wonder about the tenderness, was it due to the blades? Would I have this result with a tri tip that hadn't been mechanically tenderized?

    Made a chimichurri sauce to go with it, another first for me and that was fantastic.

    #2
    How did you slice it? If you haven’t watching a good video or reading a good article on slicing Tri-Tip can really help.

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    • Mark V
      Mark V commented
      Editing a comment
      I did try to slice across the grain, but actually, if I didn't then that would happen on the plate.
      It was way tender.

    #3
    I cook them slow at about 220 until 115 internal. Take it off and crank up my Weber gasser to about 475-500 and sear on my GriddleGrate for 75 seconds on each side and always slice against the grain. I also put a dollop of garlic butter and olive oil on the plate before I put the tri-tip on it to give us some dipping sauce. Do the same with blackened tuna.

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      #4
      I worked with a woman whose son lived in Minnesota, he had moved there from CA. Every time she went to visit, she brought a carry on full of tri tip (pre 9/11). I couldn't fathom why she​​​​​ had to do this, now I know- we get all the tri tip here in California.

      If you cook it to medium rare and SLICE IT PROPERLY, your tri tip will be tender, blade tenderizing be damned. I would say it's pretty easy up to medium- medium plus if it's sliced correctly. Even cooking it at 325 to medium rare will produce excellent results.
      ​​​​Cook it at 250 to 125 IT, sear it, slice it against the grain, heaven.

      For real Santa Maria, make a rub of equal parts garlic,salt, and pepper. Rub it with that 6 or more hours prior.
      Last edited by McFlyfi; July 22, 2021, 11:19 PM.

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        #5
        Congrats on your 1st Tri-Tip. May the next two be even better

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          #6
          You hit the jackpot there with tri-tip and chimichurri sauce, Mark V . That's how my family prefers it. With pinquitos, of course.

          I've done tri-tip SV + sear and also with reverse sear, and like the results of both methods. SV + sear guarantees the tenderness, though. I prefer 12 hours at 131°.

          Sous vide for a blade-tenderized steak seems safer, since, as long as the right time/temp combo is selected, the steak will also be pasteurized.

          Kathryn
          Last edited by fzxdoc; July 23, 2021, 05:45 AM.

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            #7
            I have cooked literally thousands of tritips (fire department fundraisers, weddings, regular meals, etc.) and they are a pretty forgiving cut, even when overcooked. I have never (nor would I knowingly) get one that was tenderized or pre-seasoned. I've done all kinds of things to them, but it really is a cut that shines on its own and only needs some S&P and GP, although a nice shake of flaked sea salt or Montreal seasoning is pretty good when serving. I have SV'd them, mostly for efficiency when doing 5 or 6 for a party, but my favorite and go-to method is Santa Maria style over an oak wood fire. But, as noted above, the simplest method is roasting L&S until IT of 120 or so then searing off on a very hot pan or fire. One aspect, however, that is pretty unforgiving with this cut is how it's sliced. It is imperative to cut across the grain or you will have a very chewy but still delicious piece of meat. Every Friday many markets/delis out here will do TT sandwiches and I can instantly tell when they slice the meat incorrectly. As far as procuring, do you have a regular butcher shop that you can use? I like to go to Costco and get a cryovac of 5-6 untrimmed TT's then bag/seal/freeze individually.

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              #8
              Slicing shown here.
              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gmxHmuV4vTU

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                #9
                I have yet to see a tri tip other than some pre-seasoned frozen ones at Costco one time. Never have seen it fresh anywhere around town, so I ordered it from Porter Road once to see what all the fuss was about. It was really good, but at the end of the day, was just another cut of steak. If I could buy it here I would, but I'll stick with NY strips and Ribeyes in the meantime.

                SV is smart with the blade tenderized stuff, and is probably how I would have gone with it.

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                  #10
                  Tri Tip is a favorite of ours. We are able to get it at our local "Super Value" Grocery Store. SV is my go to way to prepare it. Usually dry brine overnight then SV @134 for 8-10 hour and sear.

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