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bone-in country ribs temp???

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    bone-in country ribs temp???

    I apologize if this has bee beat to death, but couldn’t find it: I’m trying my first pork smoke with about 1.8 lbs of bone-in country style ribs on my little Smokey Joe, and I can’t find any real good info on how hot to cook them.... planned on cooking low n slow at about 225, but do I take these off at 145, or push on up to 203 (Or “probe tender”) like a brisket? Plan to dry brine & then rub, but not sure how long to cook!

    #2
    I go high internally. They will stall running low and slow. Once they hit around 200 internally I'll apply some cold BBQ sauce and keep rolling until the sauce has reduced and they've warmed back up internally.

    Comment


    • patcrail
      patcrail commented
      Editing a comment
      When you say “high”, do you mean like 325 on the grill?

    #3
    https://www.chowhound.com/recipes/gr...ork-ribs-30402 here is one..

    Comment


    • patcrail
      patcrail commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks, HawkerXP, but those are boneless, which, as far as I can tell, are cut from the rear and cooked like a chop.... mine are bone-in, cut from the shoulder, and act much more like a butt

    • HawkerXP
      HawkerXP commented
      Editing a comment
      Ooopsie

    • EdF
      EdF commented
      Editing a comment
      This is the thing. Depending on where you are (and maybe other factors), there are two cuts that get labeled "country ribs". One is mostly from the shoulder; the other mostly from the loin. The first goes the full ~200 degrees; the second, ~145 degrees. Sometimes we get "loin end" roasts that are a mix of the two. We like them, but they're tricky to cook.

    #4
    Do you know if it's cut up pork butt or if it's end loin? The ones I usually find are cut up butt.

    Comment


    • patcrail
      patcrail commented
      Editing a comment
      I don’t, but I’m going with assumption they are butt—-from what I read on here (on the free sight ) is that “bone-in” are cut from the shoulder end, so more like a butt than a chop???
      Last edited by patcrail; June 23, 2020, 12:35 PM.

    • LA Pork Butt
      LA Pork Butt commented
      Editing a comment
      @patctail Knowing is important as to how you cook them. If they are from the butt they should be red like a butt would be with marbling. If they are from the loin they will be more pink like a loin chop and have little to no marbling of fat in the meat. If they are from the loin they will dry out at 225.

    #5
    If the country ribs look like butt (shoulder roast) -- the meat has more connective tissue, darker color, multiple muscle groups -- cook 'em like you'd do a pork butt. But, honestly, I wouldn't cook country ribs at 225 F -- they kinda dry out if you do that because it will take too long to get them to temperature.

    I'd go closer to 275-350 F, use indirect heat, and turn every 15-30 minutes to even out any hot spots. Pull them when you like the texture. I'd say the temp when you pull will be at least 180 F (bite off the bone or cut with a knife, maybe a little moister) to a little over 200 F (softer, pull off the bone, but maybe a little bit drier.)

    If they look more like loin chops -- pale color, one main muscle group, not a lot if any connective tissue, little or no marbling -- cook 'em like chops. If you don't, they'll be dry and tough. I'd shoot for an internal temp of, oh, around 135 F maybe a bit higher, depending on your preference for pork. I'd use the same 275-350 F cooker temp and indirect heat.

    Comment


    • HawkerXP
      HawkerXP commented
      Editing a comment
      I forgot you explained this some time ago. When I've been looking at these you will see some that have both the pale and dark meat. I assume we should stay away from these and look for a more consistent color either pale or dark?
      Last edited by HawkerXP; June 24, 2020, 09:30 AM.

    • IowaGirl
      IowaGirl commented
      Editing a comment
      HawkerXP -- I agree -- I made the mistake of getting some with a mix of loin and shoulder awhile back and regretted it. One or t'other is what works best for me.

      patcrail -- I hope they cook up nice for you! Sounds like your Smokey Joe is made for this cut of meat. I like the shoulder-type country rib the best. They are more forgiving to cook and usually moist and flavorful. A raspberry chipotle sauce is real nice as a glaze -- sweet-hot with a bold fruit flavor.

    • Mr. Bones
      Mr. Bones commented
      Editing a comment
      Hmmmm I've never, fortunately, been presented with a package that was of both varieties, together. I will not utilize th words* here that I would be expressin, but these are two wholly different cuts, an techniques required to bring em to goodness.
      Not even horseshoes, an hand grenades involved, here; not talkin apples/oranges...more like apples/turnips, or worse. lol!

      * reasonably safe to say that I would be a rather unhappy man, an leave it right there...

    #6
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ID:	868245 Well here’s the starting product: dry-brined 2 hrs, rubbed with “Modified Memphis Dust” (cumin & Chile powder in place of some of the paprika)..... and trying to do a “C” setup on the charcoal—— this Weber 14” is extremely hard to dial down low.... even plugging the gap when running temp probes under the lid, I still have to close bottom vent below 1/8, and top below 1/4 just to stay below 300....

    Comment


      #7
      In a dream world, all meat sellers in the states would use the FDA standardized Institutional Meat Purchase Specifications on labels. Some states allow you to call things by almost any name you can think of so no wonder it's confusing.

      Comment


        #8
        Well thanks, everyone! I’m SURE these are from the shoulder/butt, and have been smoking at 280-300 for almost 3 hours, up to about 170 internal, debating on whether to let them go to 200 or pull them earlier

        Comment


        • EdF
          EdF commented
          Editing a comment
          From the pic, they looked like the shoulder kind.

        • Mr. Bones
          Mr. Bones commented
          Editing a comment
          Yup. EdF Brother....
          Which def cornfuses me, ain't never me no seen bone-ins here, that weren't loin stuff...
          I cook Boneless (butt) Country Style alla th time...Big Fave, here, fer Family, Friends, Neighbours, Customers, Co-workers. an firstly my dang self, on accounta none of them are gonna git my BBQ, unless I'm Happy with it.

        • EdF
          EdF commented
          Editing a comment
          There aren't many of those shoulder type meat guys with the bone in, but they're less unusual than the infamous 4 leaf clover of our heritages!

        #9
        Cruising along at about 280... meat is climbing quickly now from 160 to 171+—— do I pull it at 200 or try to choke it down and let it stay at 200??? Help
        Attached Files

        Comment


        • Mr. Bones
          Mr. Bones commented
          Editing a comment
          200°? I'd pull, an eat, if they feel tender. Yer not wantin pulled pork here, an butts can often come off at 185~ish, fer slicin.
          Question: I cook on SJS's A LOT, an I gotta ask how many lit briqs are ya startin yer Joe with?
          Observation: All yer life support cables, etc., that ya got attached are holdin yer lid up, considerable, an really likely to be Screwin Heavily with yer ablilty to keep yer temps down in th range ya desire...
          LMK, as time permits; I'll do what I can to assist, Brother!
          Last edited by Mr. Bones; June 23, 2020, 05:32 PM.

        • patcrail
          patcrail commented
          Editing a comment
          Mr Bones, I think you’re spot-on with the probes propping the lid up and seriously screwing with the temps! I wanted to drill holes in the side for the probes, but there’s no way to drill above the grate & below the lid—- the real fix would be to dremmel a grooove in the base & the lid... but this cook convinced the wife that I need a PBJ, and she’s all for it, so I’m not gonna look back, lol 😆.... btw. I used about 6 coals to start the grill.... I’m pretty sure the coals were fine

        #10
        Screw it, gonna pull at 190... I’m getting worried they will dry out

        Comment


        • Dewesq55
          Dewesq55 commented
          Editing a comment
          Sounds like a good call.

        • Mr. Bones
          Mr. Bones commented
          Editing a comment
          If they seem under done (unlikely), put em in a pan, skillet, what have ya, foil tightly (no probes) , chuck em in th oven at say ~~175°-200, an sneak em up a bit, til yer happy.

        #11
        Pulled them at 190, but was shocked to see actual rib bones (seriously— ribs) in them, even though they were clearly labeled “country style ribs bone-in”—— is I guess all bets are off, but these had an incredible flavor, and the meat on the (actual rib) bone side was deliciously tender... the outer parts were chewy, not sure exactly what went wrong, but I’m convinced they were mislabeled

        Comment


        • IowaGirl
          IowaGirl commented
          Editing a comment
          They look like shoulder-type country ribs to me too. Sometimes they cook up a little more tender, sometimes a little less.

          Now that you have a data point at 190, try pulling a little sooner on your next cook -- maybe around 180? -- and see what you think. That will get you dialed into the cook that works best for your tastes.

          There's no one right answer to this, as long as food safety requirements are met.

          Kudos to you -- it's great to get rave reviews from the other half, isn't it?

        #12
        Learned a lot, and propping the lid for probes really killed me on control, BUT, the wife LOVED the end result and gave me her blessing to buy a PBJ!

        Comment


        • Mr. Bones
          Mr. Bones commented
          Editing a comment
          Do ya have a pocket digital thermo? They're an indispensible tool, though really not incredibly helpful on ribs, other than as a probe...

        • HawkerXP
          HawkerXP commented
          Editing a comment
          PBJ, PBJ, pbj…..!

        • patcrail
          patcrail commented
          Editing a comment
          Mr Bones: yes, I have a Thermopro TP3H that I used to spot-check the rest of the piece

        #13
        I'm just amazed that you did all that on a Smokey Joe

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