Welcome!


This is a membership forum. As a guest, you can click around a bit. View 5 pages for free. If you would like to participate, please join.

[ Pitmaster Club Information | Join Now | Login | Contact Us ]

There are 4 page views remaining.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

First time smoker: Simple Pulled Pork recipe

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    First time smoker: Simple Pulled Pork recipe

    Yesterday I smoked for the first time, it tasted good! Even though I didn't manage to get it to 203F and it took way too long I gave up at the 13 hour mark when it was past 11pm.

    Details
    • 5lbs trimmed pork butt
    • Webber Kettle with Slow N Sear
    • Thermoworks Smoke to control grill and meat temperature
    • Whether was around mid 60s, windy, mostly sunny
    • The indirect side temperature was in between 225F and 240F for most of the day (until things got out of control, see below)
    • Recipe: Awesome Simple Pulled Pork BBQ Recipe, Especially For the Beginner
    Even though the meat didn't get to 203F, the bone was easy to remove and it came out clean with not meat attached.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2164.jpeg
Views:	278
Size:	185.2 KB
ID:	858404

    Where I think I messed up

    I used the SNS method to get to low smoking temperatures: lit up about a dozen briquets on one side, added a full chimney of unlit briquets after about 15 minutes, and Apple wood on top. (I fixed the probe after I took the photo)

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2686.jpeg
Views:	158
Size:	138.7 KB
ID:	858405

    Things were great up until the 6-hour mark, the temperature started dropping and didn't went back up. I opened the lid and notice the charcoal was spread out thin with some unlit ones on top, I remove the ashes (tapping for it to fall down) and bundled the charcoal to one side again. It worked for a while but then again the low temp alarm (set to 223F) went off, I did all these on the various moments that the temperurate would drop again:
    • Added more briquets, unlit, about a dozen or more
    • Added cold water to the reservoir when I notice it was empty
    After adding the unlit briquets I could see the meat temperate dropping a few degrees, and it would take much longer to go back up. I believe main mistake was not filling the SNS back up with charcoal the first time the temperature dropped, I kept adding more briquets a dozen a time for too long which kinda created my own stall.

    At least I learned, took notes of everything, and had a good meat to eat.

    #2
    Looks good and it seems you are learning how your cooker works! Keep it up!

    Comment


      #3
      Looks great. The 203F temp is just a guide mark, not set in stone. Depending on the piece of meat it could be 195F or 210F You did good and that's how ya learn, by doing.

      Comment


        #4
        I think adding water is unnecessary, and adding cold water will work against your attempts to get the heat back up. Also, if you are shooting for 225, setting the low temp alarm at 223 creates an awfully tight window to try to maintain. But it looks like it turned out great in spite of all of that.

        Comment


        • fcy
          fcy commented
          Editing a comment
          True, using the alarm to tell when to start acting seems like a better approach.

        #5
        Congratulations on a job well done, amigo!
        Pork looks nice an juicy, well developed dark bark, which is always where I go...
        Very nice Smoke Ring, as well...

        Thoughts, questions, tips...
        What kinda rub did ya use?; looks like it done a fine job
        Since ya gots a spiffy digital thermo, an obviously were monitorin closely, I'd haveta suggest:

        Next time, when ya see yer temps start fallin, fire off yer startin amount of lit briqs in yer chimley...
        When they's ready, open yer cooker, tunk th ashes some, dump in th lit, then add enough unlit up again em to sustain th fire fer th time needed.
        More wood chunks, as well, is what I do.
        Repeat as neccessary...
        It'll recover temp more quickly, this way.

        If'n ya ever wanna / need to add more water, use boilin, or at least as hot as yer water heater can deliver...this will also greatly speed recovery time...

        I generally shoot fer ~275°, it's always gonna vary up an down, but yer butt will cook in much less time, an can take th heat.
        Ya done a Most Excellent job, in anybody's eyes, even more so fer first time out., sez I !

        Glad to have ya here, brother!

        Please hop over HERE, an introduce yerself.
        Last edited by Mr. Bones; June 7, 2020, 04:18 PM.

        Comment


        • fcy
          fcy commented
          Editing a comment
          I used Meathead's Memphis Dust Rub.

          Yes, I'll definitely lit the chimney and dump them lit next time. At around hour 10 or 11 it did hit me that I was just holding on to the low temperature by adding a dozen briquets at a time, it then finally hit me to use the chimney just like you said.

          Thank you very much 😁

        • Mr. Bones
          Mr. Bones commented
          Editing a comment
          Learned th same dang way, brother...
          Thought mebbe I could give ya a leg up.
          Still a damfine butt, sez I.
          It is always my distinct pleasure to be of any assistance.
          I don't know mucha doodly squat, but I'll willinly share lol!

        #6
        you might also have not had the vents open enough, esp as ash might have closed them a bit. Try starting them a bit more open and go for 275 next time. 225 seems to be popular but I've not noticed a difference with the butt at 275.

        Comment


        • smokin fool
          smokin fool commented
          Editing a comment
          Agreed, I do butts anywhere between 275 and 325 now depending on what kind of mood my BKK is in.
          Not knocking low and slow but I'm into instant gratification these days

        • Mr. Bones
          Mr. Bones commented
          Editing a comment
          +1, +1

        #7
        Half the fun of all this is the learning and adapting to the challenges of the cook. You did that and came out with some good pork. Well done!

        Comment


        • fcy
          fcy commented
          Editing a comment
          Thank you, looking back it was a nice experience and overcoming the challenges feels great. But in the middle of it I did get a bit desperate at some points thinking I wouldn't be able to do it.

        • Mr. Bones
          Mr. Bones commented
          Editing a comment
          Gittin desperate means ya actually were monitorin what was goin on, an deeply cared bout th outcome...

          Happens to us all, despite how many decades cookin...

          Fact of th matter is ya made it work.

          I admire that.

          Moderate amounts of Adult bevvies can help mitigate th anxiety, if ya have any proclivity.

        #8
        Tenderness is a combination of time and temp. People here sous vide meats at much lower temps than 225° and get tender results. But they SV for many hours. You had enough time despite temp problems.

        I agree that cookin' at a higher temp will give you the same results, and save some time too.

        And welcome to The Pit.

        Comment


          #9
          I am glad it came out good. Here are a few thoughts for your next cook. First, the thickness of the meat determines cook time. It looks like you tried that butt up making look thicker than the 5 inch thick 10 #ers I usually cook. Second, I usually pull mine at 200 internal and wrap in foil and hold in an ice chest for at least 2 hours. The Boston Butt is the most forgiving piece of meat you can cook. You might consider those factors when you plan your next cook

          Comment


          • fcy
            fcy commented
            Editing a comment
            The recipe said to tie the butt up so I just followed, I did wonder if it was really necessary and my conclusion was that making its thickness more "homogenous" was a good reason. I was afraid that if I didn't tie some parts would be overdone -- maybe I overthought it.

            I'm curious, what does leaving it rest for the 2 hours do?

          • LA Pork Butt
            LA Pork Butt commented
            Editing a comment
            fcy for me it cooks a little more, and I am better able to remove the excess fat from between the various muscles. I have never tied one unless it was boneless in order to keep it together. If it has uniform thickness I don’t think tying has much value. Also, by finishing the cook early and holding it gives you better control over serving time. I usually do overnight cooks and serve for noon.
            Last edited by LA Pork Butt; June 7, 2020, 06:56 PM.

          #10
          Good looking cook!

          I like to cut them in half to smoke.
          Shorter cook time. More bark.

          You'll figure out how long the fuel lasts and how to add more.

          If it gets late, you can always pop it in the oven at 250 to finish.

          Had a buddy cook an 7 lb butt that went into a 9 1/2 hour stall the other week. Ended up having pulled pork for breakfast but his patience was rewarded.

          Comment


          • Mr. Bones
            Mr. Bones commented
            Editing a comment
            I keep thinkin on tryin that...
            Ya cuttin lengthwise, or crossways?
            Crossways makes th most sense to me...
            Bone half, no bone half...
            Mo barkiliciousness= Win Win....

          • BFlynn
            BFlynn commented
            Editing a comment
            Crossways. 1/2 with bone. 1/2 without.
            Try to get them closish to the same size.

            Haven't been able to tell one half from the other when in eating it.

          • Mr. Bones
            Mr. Bones commented
            Editing a comment
            Thanks, BFlynn
            Hope ya use that bone, any extry jus, an some trimmins/with leftover pulled pork to make a fine pot of beans, or chili, as well!
            Leave us not ever fergit pp tacos, breakfast burritos, ad nauseum
            Last edited by Mr. Bones; June 7, 2020, 09:31 PM.

          #11
          Looks good from where I'm sitting.
          Some great advice here to try on your next cook.
          I've been doing butts for years now and every so often things go sideways.
          Live n learn.

          Comment


          • Mr. Bones
            Mr. Bones commented
            Editing a comment
            yup, it do happen to us all, given time...
            Cool thing is, he caught it, first time out, an made it work...
            I admire that, in a cook.
            I'd hire him, learn him up...
            Last edited by Mr. Bones; June 7, 2020, 09:34 PM.

        Announcement

        Collapse
        No announcement yet.
        Working...
        X
        false
        0
        Guest
        500
        ["pitmaster-my-membership","login","join-pitmaster","lostpw","reset-password","special-offers","help","nojs","meat-ups","gifts","authaau-alpha","ebooklogin-start","alpha","start"]
        false
        false
        {"count":0,"link":"/forum/announcements/","debug":""}
        Yes
        Rubs Promo
        Meat-Up in Memphis