Welcome!


This is a membership forum. As a guest, you can click around a bit. View 5 pages for free. If you would like to participate, please join.

[ Pitmaster Club Information | Join Now | Login | Contact Us ]

There are 4 page views remaining.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

country style ribs

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    country style ribs

    Last night my wife cooked country style ribs in the oven. She marinated them in Adolph's meat tenderizer mix, then into the oven at 350 uncovered. I had read in Meatheads book to treat them like pork chops, and pull at 135. I convinced her to let me put a probe in one of them during the cook. They got up to 135 pretty fast and I told her they were done. To my horror she stuck a fork into one of them and said no they are not. They continued to cook until I could not stand it and got out the thermopen MK4. The ribs were at 178. We pulled them and they sat in the water for about 10 minutes.

    They were good, but a bit on the dry side. With so much water it was hard to tell if it was from the meat or the water.

    My questions are:
    Do i treat them like pork chops and not ribs?
    If i am going to cook country style ribs on a gas grill what is the best grill temp and pull temp?

    Thanks for the help.

    #2
    My wife loves to cook country style ribs in the oven. She uses a modified pork sparerib recipe printed in the 70's. She preheats to 450, puts the ribs in a roasting pan and roasts for 30 minutes uncovered, no sauce or spices. Then removes, drops oven to 350, drains the fat out of the pan. Prepares a sauce of catsup, Worcestershire, chili powder, and salt & pepper. Heat the sauce then slather on the ribs. Thinly slice 2 lemons and 2 yellow onions and place around ribs. Back into the oven for 1 1/4 hours, She never uses a meat thermometer even though I sneak in with my MK4 once in awhile.

    Served with mashed taters or rice. They are very tender and the sauce makes up for the "dryness". Of course, that does not answer your question, but based on the recipe I would cook them on the gasser like you would spareribs. Indirect, 250-275. Not sure about wrapping as I do not do that when I smoke ribs.

    UPDATE: I should note, and in line with later posts, these are shoulder cut, not loin.
    Last edited by GolfGeezer; March 4, 2020, 02:28 PM.

    Comment


      #3
      There are two types: Loin Country Style and Butt Country Style. I cook the Butt style and take them up high (200-ish) to probe tender and put some BBQ sauce at the end of the cook so it can reduce somewhat.

      Comment


      • JCGrill
        JCGrill commented
        Editing a comment
        +1 most of the ones I make are the butt style and get a 200-degree cook.

      #4
      You mention water. Water and ribs? 😳Say it ain’t so.
      I think the communists just won. 😬
      πŸ˜πŸ˜‚

      Comment


      • Smokerstoker
        Smokerstoker commented
        Editing a comment
        They might be communist but they're not crazy :-)

      • bmcguire
        bmcguire commented
        Editing a comment
        I know, water right? I was trying to keep my nose out of most of the prep because...wife.

      • Steve B
        Steve B commented
        Editing a comment
        bmcguire I totally understand.
        If mine had any desire to cook anything I’d be in the same situation. πŸ˜”πŸ˜

      #5
      Like Jerod says - it really depends on which cut of pork these country style "ribs" came from. If it is from the loin, then 135 to 145 will be good. If its from the shoulder like a butt, then it needs to cook to 195 or so to be tender. Most I have ever seen come from the shoulder, are well marbled, and have a LOT of connective tissue, and need to cook low and slow to the higher temp, just like a butt. Due to being thin, they won't take the hours a butt will take, but do benefit from braising. If yours were really lean looking meat, then it was likely from the loin area, and those would need to be treated like a chop.

      I am almost betting that yours were actually underdone, and that's why they were tough, just like a butt that does not reach pulling temperature.

      Here's a recipe from the Internet that has some good pictures and procedure for oven cooked country style "ribs". Look at the photo of the raw meat in this article and see if that is what yours looked like, if so.... well, your wife needed to cook them even longer. And finish out of the liquid with some BBQ sauce.

      https://bakingmischief.com/country-style-pork-ribs/
      Last edited by jfmorris; March 4, 2020, 02:11 PM.

      Comment


      • IowaGirl
        IowaGirl commented
        Editing a comment
        +1 on this advice!

      • surfdog
        surfdog commented
        Editing a comment
        Yep.
        I use the butt/shoulder cut occasionally as my mother prefers β€œcountry style ribs.” I treat them like I would a regular pork butt...just not as long, as jfmorris stated.

      #6
      Great feedback. This is my first post and i found everything valuable. Thank you all.

      Comment


        #7
        At the risk of getting myself excommunicated from the Pit, back when I was a heathen, I used to parboil country style ribs (often a combination of rib-end loin and butt) for about 15 minutes in heavily seasoned water, them grill them on the gasser. Naked until nicely browned, then sauced and turned several times to caramelize and set the sauce. To be honest, they were pretty f-ing good. Now that I am enlightened, I dry brine, season with MMD and smoke until ~190-195 then the same grill and sauce treatment. They are even better than the pre-enlightenment ones.
        ​​

        Comment


        • Dewesq55
          Dewesq55 commented
          Editing a comment
          They would also be good sous vide a at 165Β°F for 12 (or more) hours then grilled off and sauced.

        • tdimond
          tdimond commented
          Editing a comment
          My mom has a similar non-enlightened recipe, but she reserves the stock from boiling to make rice. The rice that way is great!

          Maybe I'll get smart, catch the drippings from the enlightened approach, and use that in the rice water . . .

        #8
        Final thought: Malcom Reed has a great YouTube video on country style ribs on the smoker. I'm not big on the braising thing for BBQ, but Malcom knows his sh*t so I'm sure they are excellent.

        Comment


        • JCGrill
          JCGrill commented
          Editing a comment
          I use this technique every time. It's awesome.

        #9
        If from shoulder, dry brine and sear quickly then add to a hotel pan with onions and a thinned out sauce. Can thin the sauce with just about anything...soda-water, apple juice, cider vinegar, hooch, beer, chicken stock. Cover with foil and indirect cook at about 325Β° for about 2 hours to braise until fall apart tender. Serve over mashed potatoes

        Comment

        Announcement

        Collapse
        No announcement yet.
        Working...
        X
        false
        0
        Guest
        500
        ["pitmaster-my-membership","login","join-pitmaster","lostpw","reset-password","special-offers","help","nojs","meat-ups","gifts","authaau-alpha","ebooklogin-start","alpha","start"]
        false
        false
        {"count":0,"link":"/forum/announcements/","debug":""}
        Yes
        Rubs Promo
        Meat-Up in Memphis