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Smoking pork the NC way: Part 2

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    Smoking pork the NC way: Part 2

    As mentioned in Part 1 Eastern Carolina smoked pork is done a whole different way. They use the whole hog and instead of the red ketchup based mop they use a vinegar mop. Now there hogs are big and need a couple of men to flip them so for home cooking the recipe is down sized for a smaller smoker and one man cooking.

    First the meat: Since you are doing the whole pig you are getting a different flavor though since the hams, bellies, loins, etc. are included. For a home smoker you will want to get a smaller 80lb pig and have it butter flied, so it lays flat. Get some chicken wire and cut two pieces to fit and tie them together over and under the pig. This also gives you a handle to flip the pig.

    Rub: Normally just salt and pepper

    The sauce, six ingredients:

    5 cups distilled white vinegar
    3 T salt more to taste
    3 T sugar
    3 T Freshly ground back pepper
    2 T Hot red pepper flakes
    3 T Hot sauce such as Texas Pete(made in NC) or your favorite
    This recipe from Steven Raichlen and uses the same 6 ingredients Meathead does.

    The pigs are again cooked over a bed of coals or off set smoker . The difference here is they are flipped every hour or so and mopped about every 1/2 hour. Smoking temp will be around 250 and timing for an 80lb one 8-10 hours. You can do a smaller 50lb one in 6-7 hours. Once the pig is pulled from the smoker, you can pullall of the meat out from the skin onto a large board, don't forget the cheeks leave the layer of fat along the back. Then use a set of cleaver to chop the meat to size or more arduously pull the meat which seems to take forever. After chopping add some of the some of the sauce and mix the meat so that everyone will get a little of all parts of the pig. The last but not least in my view is that golden skin. Cut it in to 1/4 inch pieces and deep fry and mix in for a little crunch. Pull the pig off the fire when the shoulder reaches 195 the hams may be slightly lower. Also put foil on the ears after 3 hours to keep from burning.

    Serve on a bun with a vinegar slaw, no mayonnaise this time and sauce on the side again a couple different heat levels.


    Now for areas that are joint to boat types:

    Woods: Oak and Hickory are prevelant through NC with a town name Hickory in western NC There are also a lot of apple orchards and while the commercial don't use it I will use a chunk that lasts about an hour.

    Cooking temps: 150 works well, even 175 will not dry them out they have plenty of fat and collagen to soften
    Last edited by mountainsmoker; June 21, 2019, 04:16 PM.

    #2
    Thanks!

    Comment


      #3
      Many Thanks, once again, fer sharin some of yer regional receipts...

      Comment


        #4
        Thanks for that. Meathead's book has the plans in it to build a pit that will take a whole hog - I see that in my far away future when I get time.

        Comment


          #5
          That's what I grew up with.

          Comment


            #6
            Good write-up. My only added suggestion is not to be flipping the hog so much. Start skin side up for the first 4-5 hours so the temp is around 130-140 and then flip once to skin side down. After this point the muscles start to relax and even with wire the turning gets difficult. With the skin now down your mop will be directly on the meat and mix with the natural juices for the remaining cook.

            Comment


            • mountainsmoker
              mountainsmoker commented
              Editing a comment
              Don that is a good point. Maybe flip it only every hour the first 4 hours then roast it skin side down the rest of the time. This lets you get some sauce on the meat during that first 4 hours.

            #7
            I have a friend who is raising a hog for me. It is supposed to be ready sometime in October and I plan to build a pit and smoke it up. Should be about 180-200 lbs hanging weight. Now I just need to find 100 friends to come over and help me eat it!

            Sam Jones recently released a whole hog book that I thought was very good: Whole Hog BBQ: The Gospel of Carolina Barbecue with Recipes from Skylight Inn and Sam Jones BBQ

            I plan on taking from that, from Meathead's book, and from Franklins show on PBS and see what I can do.


            Comment


            • JoeSousa
              JoeSousa commented
              Editing a comment
              klflowers A lot of the book is biographical and historical but the second half goes pretty in depth in how to cook a hog. There are also some other good looking recipes in there I want to try. Definitely an interesting read.

            • Bkhuna
              Bkhuna commented
              Editing a comment
              The old man that taught me to make pork was from Ayden, SC.

            • 58limited
              58limited commented
              Editing a comment
              Great, now I have MCBS - More Cook Book Syndrome

            #8
            never done whole hot, but always wanted to try. This seems much more manageable than most of the recipes that call for more hog, and less piglet. On the above mentioned swine, what is the finished yield, and estimated # of mouths?

            Comment


            • Donw
              Donw commented
              Editing a comment
              The NC Pork Council recommends 1 1/2 lbs of dead carcass for each person so a 100 lb hog would feed about 40 people.

            • mountainsmoker
              mountainsmoker commented
              Editing a comment
              That is a good question. Figure on 50-60% meat. You will lose the skin, bones and fat. So lets be cautious and say 50% on a 60lb piglet would be 30lbs of meat and 3/4 lb per sandwich roughly 40 sandwiches.

            #9
            Well I’m not cookin a hog anytime soon, but this has been really cool that you shared this with us. One more thing, actually two, that is on my growing list. 🕶

            Comment


              #10
              I have some cousins outside Memphis that used to do a hog a year in a hole dug in the ground. They used seasoned logs burned down to coals. Took about 24 hours; some of the best pork I have ever eaten. And some of the best drinking I have ever done - they had some of the smoothest moonshine in unlabeled quart jars I have had.

              Comment


                #11
                "Cooking Temps: 150 or 175"...Is that possibly a typo and you meant 250 or 275? You're pulling the hog when the shoulders get to 195. Great write up! Thank you!

                Comment


                • Old Glory
                  Old Glory commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I was thinking the same thing.

                • Donw
                  Donw commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Cooking temps would be around 250 over the coals, but you start checking doneness around 180 in the meat by looking for pink by the ham bones. Once the pink is gone, its done.
                  Last edited by Donw; June 21, 2019, 10:28 AM.

                • mountainsmoker
                  mountainsmoker commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Donw you keep me on my toes. Yes the cooking temp is 250. Have corrected it.

                #12
                Thanks!

                Comment


                  #13
                  Pig pickin' time!

                  Comment


                    #14
                    Thanks for this write-up as well. I've been wanting to go Whole-Hog for awhile now. Some here in Texas (and I'm sure in many other states) make a temporary pit with cinder blocks and a cattle panel as the grill grate to do whole hogs. Sometimes they use a piece of tin roofing as a lid if needed. When done you can easily take it down and stack it all out of the way.

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