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Pork Butt Low & Slow or Extra Low & Extra Slow

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    Pork Butt Low & Slow or Extra Low & Extra Slow

    Looking to eat some pulled pork before the Buffalo Bills Game Sunday Night. I have a 9 lb. pork butt I'm gonna smoke on my Grilla OG.

    I'm thinking about putting this on the OG Saturday night about 10 PM at 200 instead of 7:00 AM the next morning at 275. I am doing this hoping for more smoke flavor.

    I have never smoked anything at 200 before. Is there anything I need to watch out for or be concerned about.

    Thanks
    Steve

    #2
    There is nothing I'd be worried about cooking at 200 and then bumping it up to 275. I would plan on bumping it up to 275 around 7am so you can maximize sleep and shave some time off your cook.

    I think if you have the new Grilla app you might be able to tell it to do this automatically at 7am so you won't even have to check it until it is done.

    Comment


      #3
      Should work out mighty fine. The nice thing is if it gets done early there's zero harm in holding a pork butt a long time afterward, only makes it easier to shred.

      Comment


      • Mr. Bones
        Mr. Bones commented
        Editing a comment
        Big Ten-Four, Good Buddy!!!

        Alla them words is Truth!

        P.S: I hold em in a foil-wrapped 4" halfpan, to retain moisture, an juiciness...have successfully held over 24 hrs, countless times, in a lowest settin lectric oven, (~170°F) to Rave Reviews, without exception...

      #4

      I did an overnight cook on Pork Butt for Pulled Pork and worked well.
      Go pellet grills with WIFI.
      My Traeger's WIFI has alarms, includes one for low pellets.
      Plan your cook, cook your plan + rest time.
      Looking forward to your review.

      "Pellet Heads" live long and Prosper.
      Last edited by bbqLuv; October 8, 2021, 09:23 AM.

      Comment


        #5
        Since I’ve had my Grilla silverback that’s how I’ve been doing my butts this year and they’ve been the best I ever made. I’ve been putting them on before bed and then checking on them in the morning and going from there. Sometimes I’ve brought them up to 225 after I wrapped them but the first few I did I just left it there the whole time.

        Comment


        • bbqLuv
          bbqLuv commented
          Editing a comment
          radiodome21 way to go Pellet Griller

        #6
        I have done several butts on my Silverbac. Spot on each time, but it is hard to hurt a butt...Started at 11 PM at 225 and took them to 2:00 or 2:30 and then held them until time to pull at dinner. Perfect each time. Best of luck!

        Comment


          #7
          I usually take at least 12 hours for a large butt at 225F. You should be fine. You can wrap and crank it up to speed up at the end or wrap and cambro it to hold for a few hours.

          200 might actually take a little too long.

          Comment


            #8
            Pellet grills usually do produce more smoke at lower temps and lower temps also let meat stay in the zone to absorb smoke longer. One thing though, you’ll be cooking forever to get a butt over 200 cooking at 200, so you’ll need to bump to at least 225-250 at some point. It’s just how long until you bump it you have to decide. I’ve had 8-10 pounders take 16+ hours at 225.

            The only downside to cooking that low for extended periods is increased risk of flameout, each company’s programming is different, so hard to say if that risk is really low with Grilla or a decent possibility. Sounds like radiodome21 has done it without problems, so you’ll probably be fine. Hook up a remote thermometer if you have one and set a low temp alarm.

            Also, if you’ve never tried one of the few brands that do 100% hickory pellets you should try that sometime too. CookinPellets, LumberJack (they do blends too, so make sure bag says 100% hickory), and Kingsford are the brands I know that offer them. If you’re using a single species pellet from another brand you’re likely cooking on 70-80% oak or alder and the rest what the bag says. Some of the special/competition blends from many brands skip the oak/alder.

            Comment


              #9
              I’d run it at normal temps and when it’s done give it a long hold until you’re ready. I’ve held shoulders for 12 hours in a warm oven with no problems.

              Comment


              • Mr. Bones
                Mr. Bones commented
                Editing a comment
                wrapped, I'm guessin?

              • Santamarina
                Santamarina commented
                Editing a comment
                Wrapped, of course. I wrap once it’s the color I like (meteorite), which often isn’t until it’s done. So when it comes off the pit it gets wrapped, then held.

              #10
              Your plan is good. I have a Grilla OG also and have done the overnight smoke (started between 10pm and midnight) at 195 and then bumped it up at 7am to 250. Came out great!

              Comment


                #11
                I routinely cook 10# Boston Butts at 225 overnight. They typically take 12-14 hours. I put them on at 8 pm and they finish by 8 or 10 in the morning. I hold them wrapped in an ice chest with old towels for 2-4 hours depending on when they finish to serve for noon. So, I think your 200 plan will work fine over night and you can make any necessary adjustments to cooking temp or wrapping in the morning. I would plan on holding it in an ice chest for at least two hours.

                Comment


                  #12
                  I do the same basic thing lately with brisket or butts that I smoke overnight. I run the overnight part at 225, and don't worry about it unless the fire drops below 200 (this is with charcoal and wood chunks). In the morning I bump the fire up to 275 or 300 to get it done faster so that I can get in cambro early.

                  Comment


                    #13
                    For good dinner time timing and smoke absorption, I will put a butt in the freezer and hour or two before the cook. Then somewhere around 830 or 9pm but it in my smoker at smoke for an hour (175ish), then my program automatically bumps up to 200-215 depending how thick the meat is, when I wake up depending on the IT I will ramp things up to 250 with the hope it's ready to pull and rest a few hours wrapped in the oven until dinner time.
                    Last edited by ItsAllGoneToTheDogs; October 9, 2021, 09:45 AM.

                    Comment


                    • Mr. Bones
                      Mr. Bones commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Question: Brother At Arms: Do ya rub it first, then freeze it? On accounta it's rilly hard to git any rub to adhere (means stick, or cling lol) to a piece of frozen meat...

                      I'm always out there, tryin to learn...please, do help a brother out.

                    • ItsAllGoneToTheDogs
                      ItsAllGoneToTheDogs commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Mr. Bones always dry brine the night before. The freezer time doesn't really freeze it, just gets some extra cold in it for more smoke absorption which is more important on a pellet smoker IMO

                    • tdimond
                      tdimond commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I've started doing this also and I like the results.

                    #14
                    I do this for overnight cooks with butts in both my Yoder and my cabinet. Get it on at about 6pm at 200 and then the next morning up it to 250. Always has come out great.

                    Comment


                      #15
                      I've been doing this on the Grilla OG to get better smoke, especially for the overnight cooks. Depending on when I need it done, I bump up to 250 or so to finish. It's been great results with lots of compliments.

                      The thing I would keep an eye on is making sure you don't have a flameout trying to keep the temperature that low. I had one on an overnight brisket cook where I was doing the 200F approach, but that turned out to be a loss of feed.
                      Last edited by tdimond; October 9, 2021, 11:07 AM.

                      Comment

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