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Salt in dough

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    Salt in dough

    I found this videoto be interesting and helpful...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZt2...ZzS3UifQ%3D%3D

    #2
    I wish he would have talked about iodine. I have read that iodized salt can harm yeast activity, and also that some people can taste the iodine in the end product. I have also read the opposite on both accounts. I personally use non-iodized salt when baking just to be safe. I use iodized salt as table salt, so I get enough iodine, and can't really say I can taste iodine with the amount I use for seasoning.

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      #3
      Thanks for posting the link. Interesting. After the Meathead's pizza happy hour, I reached out to David Joachim. He co-authored "Mastering Pizza" and is the editor of amazingribs.com. I had a questions about when to add salt into Neopolitan dough recipes. I'm pasting our exchange, you may find this helpful. I certainly did and it emphasizes the point in the video you posted.
      First, my question(s). "A couple of things I'm confused on and it's not really addressed in either book or the happy hour is adding salt for a Neapolitan pie. Of course the concern is that salt kills yeast. In your book you mix/dissolve salt in water and then add the yeast. I've seen something that says mix the water with the yeast and then add the salt with 10% of the flour and then continue to add flour. Your thoughts?"

      David's response: "Salt *eventually* kills yeast. Kind of like salt on a slug. But it doesn't kill it instantly. It's more accurate to say that salt slows down yeast activity. And of course, a lot of salt on a little yeast will kill it quicker. Bottom line: you can add salt at various points in the mixing process strategically. If you WANT to slow down the yeast, you can add the salt earlier in the process. If you want to get the yeast fermentation going immediately, you can hold the salt until later in the mixing. There's no hard and fast rule. It's a matter of the effect you're trying to achieve. In Mastering Pizza, we actually do it differently in different recipes. The basic Naples Dough (p. 61) mixes the water and yeast, then the flour, then the salt. Adding the yeast first and salt last actually helps the yeast get going a little before the salt gets mixed into it. In the Old School Naples Dough (p. 67), we dissolve the salt in the water like you say. Why? Because originally sea water was used in the dough! So we make saltwater. That dough is fermented entirely at room temperature, so the salt slows down the yeast, which would otherwise ferment the dough so quickly at such warm temps that there wouldn't be enough time for flavor to develop. Then in the Roman Dough (p. 76), we actually hold the salt until after the initial mixing period. That really helps the yeast get going before mixing in the salt to put the fermentation brakes. Why did we treat salt so differently in each dough recipe? To create different doughs."

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      • treesmacker
        treesmacker commented
        Editing a comment
        So many different strategies. Thanks for posting - this makes sense!

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