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Pizza Dough Recipe Help

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    Pizza Dough Recipe Help

    Hi I'm hoping the collective genius of the Pit can help me out. We have been making Pizzas on the BGE and they have been good but not great. The crust has been too hard. Not overcooked just very dense crust that was hard to chew. (I had no problem but my 7 YO said it hurt his teeth lol) We have tried these recipes:

    https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

    https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/...recipe-1914764

    I am hoping to find that perfect chewy fold-able thinner crust. I always think it is NY Style but I am not sure. Boston style is a bit thicker than NY but still thin crust. Not crispy. The edge can be crisp but must be chewy inside.

    Am I chasing a dream?

    I bought a big bag of 00 flour online and want to use that up but open to all suggestions. Please help

    Thanks!

    #2
    I've had good luck using Ken Forkish's overnight poolish pizza dough from his book Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast - page 225. It is a high hydration dough and rises well while cooking and is chewy when eaten. The last time I made it I decided to lower the hydration which made it a little easier to handle but it also made it crunchier. Everyone recommends 00 flour but I have never used it - not available at the local stores and I haven't ordered any online.

    I also like Ken's sourdough pizza dough recipe.

    Here is the overnight poolish recipe:

    Take the ingredients in the left column, combine them, let ferment overnight about 14 hours. Then subtract the amounts used in the left column from the center column and add the difference to the poolish: Flour: 1000 - 500 = 500, water 750 - 500 = 250. Add 500 grams flour and 20 grams of salt to a large bowl and mix. Add 250 grams water to the poolish and mix then add to the flour/salt mixture and mix by hand. Allow to rise to 2 1/2 its original size - turn the dough by hand every 30-45 minutes for the first two hours*. Divide into 350 gram balls and refrigerate until use in oiled bowls. This can be kept for 3 days or so.

    Baker's formula:

    Columns are:
    Ingredients/quantity in poolish/ total in recipe/ Baker's percentages
    Flour 500 g 1,000 g 100%
    Water 500 g 750 g 75%
    Salt 0 20 g 2%
    Yeast 0.4 g 0.4 g 0.04%


    * Turning is a method of kneading, see youtube for demonstrations.
    Last edited by 58limited; April 24, 2020, 06:41 AM.

    Comment


    • Old Glory
      Old Glory commented
      Editing a comment
      I didn't think I would ever use my high school algebra again! LOL thanks!

    #3
    One of our favorite crusts is this one by Kenji. It uses Bread Flour and I like to sub about 1/2 cup Semolina so you might be able to use 00 Flour too. As I look in my notes I don't think I've tried 00 Flour with it but it might be worth a try. Just this week I saw a recipe in Taste of Home that I'm going to try soon. It uses 00 Flour. We liked the Roberta's Dough Recipe which you already have but sometimes adjusting flour combinations and how thin you stretch it will have some effect on how it bakes too. I use a BGE with a Pizza Stone and have found that a stone temp of 400-500* works best for me unless I use 00 flour which likes a hotter stone temp. Sorry for rambling so much but I feel your pain as I've tried many dough recipes too. Have fun!

    https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...zza-dough.html

    https://www.thekitchn.com/robertas-pizza-dough-22931890


    https://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/...t-pizza-dough/

    Comment


      #4
      First, if you don't have a scale, you need one. The amount of flour in a cup can vary too much depending on how you get it into the cup. And most recipes do not tell you how the flour was measured.
      Second, lower hydration doughs generally have a heavier or chewier texture. Higher hydration doughs are more tender, but a bit harder to work with because they can be sticky. The first recipe above is 65% hydration, but you can't really tell the hydration of the second because you don't know how much flour is used.

      I like Forkish's recipe above, but I also like Kenji's recipe. My suggestion is to try one of these, or even the Baking Steel recipe, (you don't have to have the steel but it helps).

      If you don't want a scale, make sure you measure the flour the same way every time. That way you can adjust the amount of flour or water to get a softer crumb. Here is a demo of measuring flour in a cup different ways. It's at the beginning of the video.

      Comment


      • RonB
        RonB commented
        Editing a comment
        Skip beat me to Kenji's recipe...

      • fkrall
        fkrall commented
        Editing a comment
        +1. Professional bakers (and I) always scale all ingredients. I advise metric readout, as it's really precise. As to scales, we have and love the OXO scale https://www.oxo.com/11lb-food-scale-...t-display.html. The pull-out display can be really handy

      #5
      I agree with all of the above. I really think going longer on the cold fermentation is key in developing a great texture, build and flavor. I use a composite stone for baking most of my pies, along with cast iron, sheets and screens. Just as important as the dough, is oven temp. It has to be screaming hot. My oven goes to 550 F, but according to my Thermoworks Smoke probes, it's actually in the 585 range, so a little extra "free" heat to use. I've been thinking of getting a steel in the near future.

      I usually shoot for around 65% hydration and at times a little higher, though it does tend to be sticky. I usually go higher hydration in CI. The forum below is pizza making nirvana and has everything about pizzas and such.

      https://www.pizzamaking.com/

      Tom Lehmann has a great NY style I use a lot.

      https://www.pizzamaking.com/lehmann-nystyle.php

      Comment


      • Jake435
        Jake435 commented
        Editing a comment
        Gonna try and upgrade from my DIY tile stone (home depot quarry stone) and grab one of those steels. The stone is nice but I've heard good things about using the steels. The Joe Dough looks to be good (https://artisanpizzakitchen.com/best...baking-stones/), and well, it's still in stock.
        Last edited by Jake435; April 25, 2020, 06:58 AM. Reason: added link

      #6
      Meathead has some good articles on pizza making. You can find them here: https://amazingribs.com/tested-recip...tbread-recipes

      Here is the direct link to pizza in the BGE: https://amazingribs.com/tested-recip...-grilled-pizza
      Last edited by rwhfly; April 24, 2020, 08:47 AM.

      Comment


      • Old Glory
        Old Glory commented
        Editing a comment
        I have been reading that section on the free side. Good info.

      #7
      I just bought and read Ken Forkish’s book below. Good read about pizza dough.

      The Elements of Pizza: Unlocking the Secrets to World-Class Pies at Home [A Cookbook] https://www.amazon.com/dp/B012KJYR3O..._VtVOEb62QCC0K

      Comment


        #8
        I've got a recipe that I like, but it results in more of a thin slightly crispy crust when I grill it, but it is soften when done in the oven or at temps below 500F. Sounds like you are looking for a big floppy foldable crust, like the Brooklyn style pizza from Domino's, which my daughter loves, or the big slices from Sbarro, which used to be at every mall around here.

        Regardless, here is the thin NY style crust recipe I use, which can be used about 2 hours after mixing the ingredients:

        https://dontwastethecrumbs.com/homem...za-sauce-ever/
        Last edited by jfmorris; April 24, 2020, 07:53 PM.

        Comment


        • Skip
          Skip commented
          Editing a comment
          I like the looks of your recipe jfmorris. I'll have to give it a try. Thanks!

        #9
        I used this most recently and it turned out really good! The guy has some pretty instructive videos as well.

        https://www.stadlermade.com/pizza-dough-calculator/

        His oven is pretty cool too, though not cheap

        https://www.stadlermade.com/products/outdoor-oven/

        Comment


          #10
          https://www.kingarthurflour.com/reci...a-crust-recipe

          This one is easy and works for me.

          Comment


            #11
            Absolutely try JKLA recipe for pizza dough. He goes into a good deal of detail in his explanation of the recipe. Do as Kenji recommends, and let it ferment at least two days in the fridge.

            Also, you MUST try “tipo 00” flour. It is very finely milled flour, and makes the BEST pizza dough.

            Comment


            • Old Glory
              Old Glory commented
              Editing a comment
              Thanks for the response but what is JKLA? I saw it below Thanks!

            #12
            This is the flour I bought:

            Comment


            • Thunder77
              Thunder77 commented
              Editing a comment
              That’s good stuff!

            • Thunder77
              Thunder77 commented
              Editing a comment
              Make J Kenji Lopez-Alt’s recipe with that flour, and it will blow you away.

            • Jake435
              Jake435 commented
              Editing a comment
              Never thought it would be so hard to find flour or yeast!

            #13
            I'm just starting on pizza dough but I will third this - get a scale. Gram scales are cheap (OXO is good) and it lets you do baker's percentages really easily. Using 500g of flour? Need 72% hydration? Easy - 0.72 * 500 = 360g.
            Last edited by rickgregory; April 25, 2020, 12:26 PM.

            Comment


            • Old Glory
              Old Glory commented
              Editing a comment
              I have a scale will do some reading to figure that out.

            #14
            Another thing that occurred to me: what is your kamado temp? What is the pizza stone temp? If you are making NY style pizza, that stone should not be too hot.

            Comment


            • Old Glory
              Old Glory commented
              Editing a comment
              I don't have a thermal gun to read surface temps but the dome temp is around 600.

            • Thunder77
              Thunder77 commented
              Editing a comment
              600 may be a little hot for NY style pizza. 450-500 maybe.

            #15
            Here is my set up. I use the BGE Pizza Stone on top of the Ceramic Grill Store's Adjustable rig with their plate setter below. That gives me indirect heat and raises the height of the pizza stone to the middle top zone in the dome. Cooking temp is approximately 600*. We use parchment paper to help slide the dough on and off the stone. Next time I will remove the parchment paper after the dough cooks a few minutes.

            The pizza was good but not great. Better than some I have had locally but the texture was off. The crust was dense and hard to chew. Will try some of these recipes. I think because I have that 00 flour I will try Serious Eats version. I have had good luck with his stuff.

            Thanks for all the suggestions and help!
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