Welcome!


This is a membership forum. As a guest, you can click around a bit. View 5 pages for free. If you would like to participate, please join.

[ Pitmaster Club Information | Join Now | Login | Contact Us ]

There are 4 page views remaining.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Science Of Juiciness

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    The Science Of Juiciness

    Hi guys! here at CR there are some BBQ Gurus (due to their long practical BBQ experience) that after sharing your article "'The Science Of Juiciness", insist that resting beef IS A MUST and that the article couldn't be more wrong, based on their practical long trajectory of been BBQ instructors, is there any point of you you could share?

    One of those self-named gurus mentioned that renamed chefs as " Ramsay o Wolfgang Puk" emphasize the importance of resting beef once cooked.

    Despite my multiple attempts to asking for their hard evidence all last on believing in their experience asking real concrete arguments.

    could get some point of view? I'm aligned with meathead point of view but wanted to validate, as I could be totally wrong, as I don't name myself as a Guru as those folks.

    #2
    I agree with the rest purists, I prefer to rest meat after cooking especially beef.
    This may or may not happen depending on the ravenous horde I live with.
    Brisket is a must for 2-4 hours, roasts 15-20 mins, steaks....well, rest just ain't happening.... burgers, gone in seconds....
    Pork and chicken is usually have at it.

    Comment


    • Ahumadora
      Ahumadora commented
      Editing a comment
      Sounds like my house. Sometimes I cut chunks off a steak in the pan and eat when I am hungry (and wifey's not lookin) It's probably still cooking when it hit's my stomach.

    • jgreen
      jgreen commented
      Editing a comment
      That’s about the time I get as well. The hoard needs food.

    #3
    People are going to do what they want to do and can disagree. Go with what you like. That being said here is a great article.

    https://www.seriouseats.com/2017/03/...sh-method.html

    Comment


    • cgrover60
      cgrover60 commented
      Editing a comment
      Wow. Great article and interesting science for sure. Instead I think I'll worry about something else and just eat when I'm ready!

    • Hulagn1971
      Hulagn1971 commented
      Editing a comment
      Great idea!

    • dubob
      dubob commented
      Editing a comment
      Can't fault the article, but way too much time & work involved for me. My speed is wide open all day long and there ain't no restin' twixt end of cookin' and start of eatin'. 😁😁😁

    #4
    I've found in the last year that when I grill a ribeye hot and fast, bring it in and slice immediately, it's a beautiful juicy red. The juice runs out onto the cutting board and can barely be contained by the juice groove. Then I put it on a platter and bring it to the table and within a few minutes, it's barely pink inside. When I let it rest for 10 or 15 minutes before slicing, there is hardly any juice on the board and the sliced steak stays red in the middle for the entire meal. That's just my experience, YMMV.

    Comment


    • Henrik
      Henrik commented
      Editing a comment
      I agree, to me resting is a must.

    #5
    I always rest when time allows. For me it provides the most juice.
    Last edited by DavidNorcross; May 1, 2020, 09:53 AM.

    Comment


      #6
      I think it’s a nuance. Do what suits you.

      Comment


      • smokin fool
        smokin fool commented
        Editing a comment
        Nailed it!!!!

      #7
      I'd love to see Kenji and Meathead do a blindfolded taste test to see if either could tell the difference between one or the other. That's a million dollar PPV event right there.

      Comment


        #8
        I agree with Mosca , I think it’s a nuisance! Let’s eat! I’ll be enjoying it whilst they are watching their steaks take a nap. I’d just grab it from em, cuz I don’t give a rip about steak etiquette!

        Comment


        • AZ Fogey
          AZ Fogey commented
          Editing a comment
          Yup - what FireMan and Mosca said. I'm also beginning to feel the same way about the sear first/reverse sear argument. Do I really care about that 1/8 inch of slightly darker meat around the outside edge? Not really, because it pretty much tastes the same to me. That said, reverse sear is what I do most of the time, but it is SO easy to overcook with that method compared to searing first.

        #9
        No rest, just a piece of bread or some mashed potatoes to sop up whatever runs out.

        Comment


        • FireMan
          FireMan commented
          Editing a comment
          Sop em up!

        • Oak Smoke
          Oak Smoke commented
          Editing a comment
          Good grief I miss the old days when you could be a meat and potatoes person. Meat,potatoes, and some good bread like maybe a crusty roll, garlic Texas toast, a cheddar biscuit, or a good slice of sourdough, those were the good old days! Now it's keto, spring mix, some awful cauliflower experiment that's "as good as" potatoes or pizza crust. No it's not! I know it's for my own good, but I don't like it.

        #10
        I went for 76 years before I even heard about the concept of resting meat. If I started with quality meat and cooked it the way we like it, it was always juicy enough for us without resting and generally better than most restaurant steaks. I'll continue to pass on the resting of any flavor of meat. Y'all do whatever suits y'all.

        Comment


        • FireMan
          FireMan commented
          Editing a comment
          Yup!

        #11
        I'm smokin pork back ribs on a pellet smoker. Using meatheads memphis dust (a low salt version) not sure how much or when (before or after run) to dry brine? I have wet brined these ribs before but unless you wash them afterward they come out way to salty! Please share you thoughts and expertise with me here.
        -bill

        Comment


        #12
        Any time I cook a large hunk of beef such as brisket or a strip loin or other roast, it inevitably gets a rest before carving, often 1-2 hours or more, especially for brisket.

        For steaks, I don't intentionally rest them, BUT it is usually 10-15 minutes by the time I get them in the house, and everyone fixes their plates and goes to sit down at the table. So.... they do get a rest of 10-15 minutes. If it is just the wife and me, which much of the time it is for steak (I save the good stuff for just us!), I've probably had it plated and been eating it within 5 minutes of it being done on the grill. I never noticed a difference, and savored every bite. If there was juice running out on my plate, I sopped it up with bread, potatoes or whatever else I was eating.

        Comment


        • klflowers
          klflowers commented
          Editing a comment
          Sop it up!!!

        • Dewesq55
          Dewesq55 commented
          Editing a comment
          If you are putting a whole hunk of meat on your plate and cutting it by the bite, then I kind of agree with you. But for the last few years, Barbara and I generally share a single ribeye which I slice and either put the cutting board or a plate with the sliced up steak on it and we help ourselves. Before I started resting before slicing, the juice all ran out on the cutting board, not our dinner plates, and the sliced meat rapidly changed from a lovely red interior to pale pink.

        • IowaGirl
          IowaGirl commented
          Editing a comment
          This is an interesting point y'all are making -- the way the meat is served and eaten may affect whether an "official" rest period is useful or not. My hubby and I often share a steak like Dewesq55 does, by slicing it so we get a taste of all parts but are less tempted to overeat. I've noticed this color change too but didn't associate it with a rest period vs no rest until I read this thread. I will have to pay attention to this now.

        #13
        Typically when I pull steaks, pork loin, chicken, etc off the grill it seems like it takes about 10-15 minutes between the time it comes off the grill and all of the other food is plated before anyone at the table cuts into their meat. That seems to work well. I usually let bone-in chicken sit for 15-20 before slicing but that's only so that the meat has cooled a little bit and is a tad easier to handle when carving.

        Comment


        • FireMan
          FireMan commented
          Editing a comment
          Let’s call it natural resting. Ya sorta rest it without the grand announcement. If ya think about it, all the fanfare of resting, then gettin the rest of victuals together & you may have a full fledge sleepover.

        #14
        Beware of people declaring absolutes when there are so many variables. I tend to rest big cuts like brisket and pork shoulder, but wouldn't think of resting a great quality steak for any long amount of time. Eat that puppy when it's cooked!

        Comment


        • JeffJ
          JeffJ commented
          Editing a comment
          1-4 hour rest for pork butt, brisket, etc makes sense because it allows for the collagen to further breakdown without turning the bark into a crispy jerky.

      Announcement

      Collapse
      No announcement yet.
      Working...
      X
      false
      0
      Guest
      500
      ["pitmaster-my-membership","login","join-pitmaster","lostpw","reset-password","special-offers","help","nojs","meat-ups","gifts","authaau-alpha","ebooklogin-start","alpha","start"]
      false
      false
      {"count":0,"link":"/forum/announcements/","debug":""}
      Yes
      Rubs Promo
      Meat-Up in Memphis