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    #46
    Lots of folks seem to have received/purchased woks for Xmas. I'm seeing a lot of wok action on the SUWYC topic lately.

    I'm on the leading edge of pulling the trigger on a US-made wok from the Wok Shop. Only hitch is that shipping is half as much as the wok set I'm considering. Quite a pill to swallow when I look at Prime shipping from Amazon for some of their woks. But this one has everything I'm looking for: flat bottom; 14 gauge carbon steel. Welded handles (wooden main handle and assist handle) so the entire inside of the wok is smooth without rivets (for what that's worth), 14 inch; comes in a package deal with lots of other goodies.

    Typing this up, I've almost convinced myself to go for it.

    OK. I just did convince myself. I'm going with this Holiday Special Package for $89.50 including shipping. The wok itself sells for $35 which was less expensive than the similarly-featured woks on Amazon selling for $60. That helped with the rationalization, along with the fact that I'd rather deal with a Mom/Pop vendor than Amazon for things like this.

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    I'm excited! Happy belated Xmas to me. It's going to be fun using this with my Camp Chef Somerset IV outdoor gas range or with the Gourmet System (hole in the center) grate on my WSCGC.

    Kathryn

    Comment


    • Bkhuna
      Bkhuna commented
      Editing a comment
      Don't rush the seasoning process. I have the 35 year old round bottom wok from China that I use outside. It's black as black can be and very non-stick.

      I wanted something a little nicer looking, with a flat bottom, that I could use indoors so I treated my self to a new a new carbon steel wok for Christmas and have been doing repeat seasonings for the last couple of weeks.

      I think I'm going to give it a whirl tomorrow.

      Looking forward to seeing what you cook with it.

    • fzxdoc
      fzxdoc commented
      Editing a comment
      How many seasonings total, Bkhuna ?

      K.

    • Bkhuna
      Bkhuna commented
      Editing a comment
      fzxdoc I'm on my 8th one this afternoon. My new wok is a Made•in and they tossed in a can of their Carbon Steel Seasoning Wax. I like it.

    #47
    Congrats, fzxdoc and welcome back from wherever you disappeared to for 3 weeks 😁. You are going to love your new wok.

    Comment


    #48
    Fantastic, fzxdoc ! I’m rilly excited fer ya. Can’t wait to see,what ya stir up, pun definitely intended. Double cool!
    Last edited by FireMan; January 8, 2021, 08:23 PM.

    Comment


      #49
      I really enjoy cookin' with a wok. I've been toying with the idea of getting a gas burner for out door use with the wok.

      One thing I really like is prepping everything early in the day and then taking a break so that it seems like I'm only spending 15 to 20 minutes fixin' supper.

      Comment


      • RonB
        RonB commented
        Editing a comment
        fzxdoc - I cut up and marinate almost everything early. Garlic and ginger don't get cut until it's time to cook, and shrimp only get a short marinade - maybe 15 min.

      • FireMan
        FireMan commented
        Editing a comment
        To back up what Ron said, you do prepare all the I fixins ahead of time. Except it’s not nice to do, it is absolutely necessary. Because the stir fry process is a matter of minutes. If you are having to cut something up or measure out, then in the meantime you are over cooking or burning something else, or gettin cold waiting for the next item. Also, don’t crowd the wok (over fill, it’s a western thing, “load er up”). Cook in small batches.
        Last edited by FireMan; January 9, 2021, 09:33 AM.

      • Polarbear777
        Polarbear777 commented
        Editing a comment
        Yep. Every little thing needs to be prepped and ready. There is zero time and the actual cooking doesn’t take long but needs 100% of your attention.

      #50
      Congrats! Wish I had the gumption to get into woking that way. Sum dae, just naught rite nau.

      Comment


        #51
        @fzxdoc looking forward to your method on the WSCGC. A 14" fits the GBS grate fine, I've done that, but I was using my Santa Maria attachment to fiddle with heat adjustment. With a fixed height, fire to grate, you'll have to just be active with the stir/flip tools. Not too difficult for someone with your skills.

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        Comment


        • fzxdoc
          fzxdoc commented
          Editing a comment
          I like that setup! Vortex underneath, wok, and the SM rig to modify the heat. Very clever.

          Kathryn

        • Old Glory
          Old Glory commented
          Editing a comment
          It looks like your fire grate is in the lower position?

        • Uncle Bob
          Uncle Bob commented
          Editing a comment
          Old Glory this is on my Bronco Pro, the vortex is set on the second level grate with the wide side up. The vortex had close to a full load of lump. In that configuration I had plenty of heat for it to function as a proper wok rather than a saute pan. Had I needed more heat I would set the vortex up small opening up to increase the air velocity/heat output.

        #52
        Encouraged by the recent Wok threads, I tried using a wok outside on my Weber kettle with a Vortex using my new kettle cooking grate with the removable center ring. However, I set it up all wrong and was not stir frying the food, but gently sautéing. The dinner still came out really good, but did not achieve the crisp tender veggies and caramelized meat that I wanted.

        I only used about a 1/2 chimney of lit coals and had my Vortex turned the wrong way. Just two pics. I always forget to keep taking pics because I get caught up in the cook. Next time, 3/4 chimney lit coals and invert the Vortex. Always fun to learn something and always fun to cook outside in So. Cal.

        Attached Files

        Comment


        • FireMan
          FireMan commented
          Editing a comment
          It is hard to tell what kind of meat (using my phone) , looks like chicken. That is classic “crowding the wok”. That would have been 2 batches. If it’s beef, no more than 12oz a batch, pork & bird you can do a little more. When you crowd you end up sautéing.

        • fzxdoc
          fzxdoc commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks for the info and the photos. It's just as important to know what not to do as what to do. I'm enjoying vicariously riding up your learning curve.

          Show us your next wok cook, pretty please, if you have the time and the opportunity, that is. I know how taking photos in the midst of a one-person cook can sometimes be the thing that tips a good meal into a slightly overdone one.

          Kathryn

        • TripleB
          TripleB commented
          Editing a comment
          FireMan and fzxdoc - Thank you for your comments and education. For overcrowding, is the same true for veggies?

        #53
        Don’t stress about seasoning it. A couple light coats and then cook with it all the time. Heck I often get the center 800F+ which pretty much smokes the seasoning down to bare metal in the very center. No big deal, by the end of the cook it is fine.

        main thing is when done cooking, immediately brush out with water (which will boil), wipe out with paper towel and some oil and get it hot until it is completely dry and the oil is smoking a bit. Wipe again and done. never ever leave food in the wok, as once it is dry it will stick and then you have to scrub etc.

        Comment


          #54
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          • fzxdoc
            fzxdoc commented
            Editing a comment
            Wow that seasoning on your wok is so pretty!

          #55
          TripleB , cooking veggies are more forgiving as far as quantity, but some veggies cook faster than others. And, some you don’t necessarily want to mix. I guess to be critical to an extent, it seems in this neck of the woods, Pitville, it’s about the Tim Allen way of cookin, The Binford 6000 turbo blast to get the maximum heat, argh, argh, argh. But, if you watch any one cook with a wok, Grace Young or Martin Yan or a couple of YouTube channels it’s not about the heat, but the technique & the process? I know we live in a culture of anti-reading but I strongly recommend one of two of Grace Young’s books The Breath of Wok or Stir Frying to the Sky’s Edge, two of the best out there on how to, care of your wok, technique, stocking your pantry, just getting a feel for the wok. It is a way of cooking that one can be mesmerized by.

          Comment


          • ofelles
            ofelles commented
            Editing a comment
            I am reading the Breath of a Wok now. Great book.

          • Richard Chrz
            Richard Chrz commented
            Editing a comment
            Thank you for the book recommendation!

          • TripleB
            TripleB commented
            Editing a comment
            I love reading cook books about food, techniques, history, etc. In fact this morning saw a video on a technique on smoking in the PK360. Next time, I gotta give that a try. Based upon your recommendation and ofelles comment, I will purchase “Breath of a Wok”. Thank you.
            Last edited by TripleB; January 10, 2021, 03:29 PM.

          #56
          Click image for larger version  Name:	BC7B0F62-0C31-4E5A-B4F4-3014A67BE89F.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	118.9 KB ID:	971771

          From earlier in this thread. The woks are the same age and type. In fact the started identical except the right is flat bottom for indoor use. The wok on the left is used over high heat and cleaned immediately the one on the right gets used inside and rarely gets cleaned (usually used as a holding vessel during the meal).

          the wok on the right works perfectly fine but the left one is almost like working with magic.

          Tricks that help me.
          1. for meat or anything with “breading” or even a light coat of something make sure it hits the oil in the wok center for just a fraction of a second before it contacts the hot wok surface. Much less likely to adhere.

          2. Unless you have a high flux power source, food has to be free of surface moisture (oil is ok) or it will steam.

          3. If you can’t toss the food around you probably have too much in there. Work in small batches of food and don’t overload. If you are indoors or have lower power, wipe out the wok between batches and let it heat-load for a little while.

          4. prep all veggies to the same thickness, that way you can cook evenly much more easily. Also really thick items will likely burn before you get enough heat to their centers.
          Last edited by Polarbear777; January 11, 2021, 08:01 PM.

          Comment


          • Polarbear777
            Polarbear777 commented
            Editing a comment
            The round bottom is nice because there are no “corners” and food slides around much easier.

          • Richard Chrz
            Richard Chrz commented
            Editing a comment
            Which one do you have? This is a great thread

          • Polarbear777
            Polarbear777 commented
            Editing a comment
            My woks are from the wok shop. Great quality and service. They even asked me a question before filling my order to ensure I had exactly what I needed.

          #57
          FireMan and Polarbear777 bring up some strong points that I just took for granted in my picture above (not realizing some tutorial comments would be needed). My picture is of the dish when it's all pulled together for service, roughly the final minute of cooking to get all the components heated and sauced together.

          For this cook the meat was seared, then removed, the noodles were fried (for crusting texture, they were cooked in water for a couple minutes first, that time varies with package instructions on the noodle you choose), then removed, and then the veggies (less cabbage), and those might be staggered based on density/size. Once the veggies are close, the meat goes back in, then sauced, then the cabbage and noodles for finish and off to the table.

          And just a comment on the pan. I'd love to use one with a long side handle and flip the contents, but when I got the pan 30ish years ago I didn't know better, and today the arthritis in my wrists won't take that kind of strain. Sometimes flipping with those utensils pictured is a bit much, but that's a personal problem that just is what it is.
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          Last edited by Uncle Bob; January 10, 2021, 02:28 PM.

          Comment


          • Polarbear777
            Polarbear777 commented
            Editing a comment
            Of course you don’t have to flip if you can keep it moving. I have a 16” also and I like that but it requires even more attention with the tools since I can’t easily pull it off the heat fir a moment.

          • Bkhuna
            Bkhuna commented
            Editing a comment
            That's some nice seasoning on your wok.

          #58
          Oh yeah. One more thing. You need serious gloves if you are handling the wok handles. Not welders, but glass blowers/fireproof etc.

          Comment


          • Richard Chrz
            Richard Chrz commented
            Editing a comment
            Thank you, I have been looking for gloves for the grill, and have not found a pair that is good enough. This sounds like a solution.

          • Polarbear777
            Polarbear777 commented
            Editing a comment
            I have these

            Newtex ZetexPlus 200 High Temperature 14 inches Gloves, Made in The USA https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00PR0KJLI...ing=UTF8&psc=1

            I also found some even beefier more heat resistant ones but they are so stiff I can’t do anything.

          #59
          Richard Chrz , hmmm, never have used gloves or needed em. I’ve watched a few cooks, never had seen any of them use either. Can’t explain what’s goin on. Plus, you’ll burn yer wood handles off I suspect.
          Last edited by FireMan; January 11, 2021, 07:20 PM.

          Comment


          • Richard Chrz
            Richard Chrz commented
            Editing a comment
            Remember I have horrible dexterity. I seem to burn myself every few weeks and even with welding gloves my hands get really hot near fire., so gloves, that are easy to get my hands in, and come up to my elbows, would help me.

          • Polarbear777
            Polarbear777 commented
            Editing a comment
            My pow woks have metal handles I have silicone wraps on them. With long wood handles you might be okay. I use a big glove on my left hand and usually none on the right.

          • FireMan
            FireMan commented
            Editing a comment
            Richard Chrz , what about multi layers of gloves? A thin cloth inside & then a good bbq glove.

          #60
          My first cook on my new wok. Recipe from https://www.justonecookbook.com/stir...ontainer-57738

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          • FireMan
            FireMan commented
            Editing a comment
            So cool to include the Japanese recipe! Looks great!

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