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Benefits of longer smoking time

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    Benefits of longer smoking time

    I was told by someone that after a certain internal meat temperature of thicker cuts( brisket/pork butt),(not time) there is no additional smoke flavor added. Any information would help, especially technical. Thank You.

    #2
    This video with Dr. Blonder may give you the information you want https://pitmaster.amazingribs.com/fo...e-ring-1hr-39m

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    • bbqLuv
      bbqLuv commented
      Editing a comment
      Go pellet grill smoker Dr. Blonder!

    #3
    I've read that meat should be at refrigerator temperature when you put it on the smoker, and after an hour or two, the meat won't absorb any more smoke. No mention was made of the thickness of the meat, whether a chuck roast or a pork shoulder (the internal temperature of these two cuts would be vastly different at that time).

    In other words, the smoke-collecting ability of meat happens at the surface, regardless of the internal temperature.

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      #4
      I believe, but don't know, that for pellet grills low and slow is the way to go. For other fuels that constantly produce smoke, I see no reason not to go low at the start and finish hot and fast?

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        #5
        AS the article that was linked above will tell you.......smoke is attracted to cool, wet surfaces. That means, at the start of the cook. That is when things are most important for smoke adhesion. Remember, smoke really does not penetrate the meat to far, it is much more of a surface treatment. You an add more smoke at the end of the cook by adding moisture to the surface of the meat, or by adding more wood. But by this point, you probably already have enough smoke on a long cook that is associated with a brisket, butt or shoulder.

        You could even smoke your cuts for a few hours and finish them in the oven with little difference in taste.

        Make sure to read this article. "What you need to know about wood, smoke and combustion."

        Focus on the "Smoke flavor is almost all on the surface of the food" section of the article."

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        • smokenoob
          smokenoob commented
          Editing a comment
          Well it seems then you folks in the north should jump in the lake before sittin’ round the campfire this time of year if ya properly want to smoke yerself. We down here in the south havta sit in the fridge for an hour before campfire! Tis the season!

        • Spinaker
          Spinaker commented
          Editing a comment
          Haha, I actually do that in my sauna sessions. 3 Mins in the icy spring water, then back into the 200 F stove.

        #6
        Welcome to The Pit.

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          #7
          Another crucial benefit of longer smoking times (or just cooking times) is to break down the connective tissues to replace the water that will have been driven off with all those wonderful juices. For many cuts from hard-workin' muscles, that extended time is essential.

          The summary article right here on AR is a great place to start: https://amazingribs.com/technique-an...-meat-science/

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