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Smoked Burgers on the FEC-100

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    Smoked Burgers on the FEC-100

    This is a slight adaptation from my first efforts at smoked burgers in the FEC-100 — this one yielded some of the most tasty burgers I've had the privilege to eat and was so simple it's comical.

    To 2.6 pounds of ground beef (we used 2x blister packs of Costco's organic 85% lean) add diced sweet onion (we used around 1 cup of Vidalia in a medium dice), 2 Tablespoons of Worcestershire, and sprinkle Tony Cachere's to taste. Mix gently and form into 1" thick patties (we got 7 out of this recipe). Place them gently on the rack, close up the FEC-100, and set to 224℉. Smoke for 60 minutes, then adjust the cook temp up to 350℉ and monitor internal temperature for a target of 155℉. Pull them promptly and enjoy!

    Oddly the link I pointed to is showing in the editor, but mangles on the displayed post to land you at my main gallery page. But the specific photo of the end result may be viewed directly at http://mgm.cx/GqaT
    End Result of Smoked Burgers on the FEC-100
    Last edited by mrmikemgm; July 19, 2014, 02:24 PM. Reason: Weirdness with the URL not working...

    #2
    Just FYI, USDA recommends ground meats be cooked to 165. I realize this is a "safe" temp and many like their burgers cooked to less than 165, but it has to be said so no one gets sick and blames us!

    Have you ever tried the reverse sear method, cooking indirect as you describe then balsting them over high direct heat to sear the exterior brown & crispy (but not burned?) Also, what wood do you use on your burgers? I find too much smoke on beef, even burgers, to be less desirable. Just curious.

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    • mrmikemgm
      mrmikemgm commented
      Editing a comment
      Agreed on the recommended core temps. I find 165℉ to be too well done for my taste, but understand the necessity of reminding about risks.

      That's the concept of sous vide entirely (reverse sear)! Everything you cook is cooked at low temp (comparatively), then you cut the pouch open and sear it for the Maillard reaction. We actually do meatballs this way all the time. Very lightly freeze so they don't squish when you seal them, then seal them, cook them, and when you're ready, open them and sear them with a crème brûlée torch. Same concept for burgers and we've gone that route too searing them on the BGE after cooking them in the water oven. Likewise for chicken, steaks, etc.

      Using hickory pellets at present for the burgers with a couple chunks of apple wood on the bottom platform of the FEC-100 Given we didn't have any smoked bacon, the smoke (evident in the red exterior on the burgers) flavor was excellent, but again, temper that with the fact that I'm a Texan and practically everything has Mesquite smoke here, which is strong. Even the brisket.

    • boftx
      boftx commented
      Editing a comment
      This is a tangent, but with respect to wood, I use mesquite a LOT since that is almost everywhere here in Vegas. Make friends with a gardner or two and you'll never be short of wood.

    #3
    Grind up some rib steaks, chuck steaks and/or short rib meat and do away with (almost all of) the worry of temperature. Just grind!

    Comment


    • Huskee
      Huskee commented
      Editing a comment
      Acually John whether you grind it or the grocery store butcher grinds it, the fact is the microbes exist on the surface of those meats. When grilling the meat whole, like a steak, you sear that outside killing the microbes. When meat is ground you're mixing whatever's on the surface down inside. So temp always matters. From a safety standpoint.

    #4
    I know Aaron but geez, did you have to ruin it for me? :-) I love a medium burger!!!!

    Comment


    • Huskee
      Huskee commented
      Editing a comment
      Lol! Sorry. Eat away my man. I like a slightly pink burger myself.

    • mrmikemgm
      mrmikemgm commented
      Editing a comment
      Ok, that made me laugh :-)

    #5
    Check this out: http://amazingribs.com/tips_and_tech...ure_guide.html

    I often cook my burgers to a final temp UNDER 150F. My family likes pink. Is it safe? Absolutely! I pasteurize the meat and hold it at a temp around 140F long enough that all the bad guys in the meat are dead.

    Comment


    • mrmikemgm
      mrmikemgm commented
      Editing a comment
      Exactly the concept we use in sous vide techniques in the kitchen. Cook the steak to a medium-rare state edge-to-edge, then hold it there for the prescribed time to kill statistically all the bugs, then you're free to throw it onto a grill to sear it and be done. Result=perfectly medium rare steak from edge-to-edge that's 100% safe.

      You can take an analogous route with in-shell eggs. Hold them at the prescribed pasteurization temp for a while and remove them and then use them to make your own homemade mayo, salad dressings, etc. without fear of the dreaded salmonella.

    • TheeMikeB
      TheeMikeB commented
      Editing a comment
      How do you keep the meat at 140 for 12 minutes?

    • David Parrish
      David Parrish commented
      Editing a comment
      You don't keep it at exactly 140F for that time. You get them close them reverse sear them. By the time that's all done they'll have been hot enough long enough all the bad stuff will be dead.

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