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Looking for a Beef Short Rib Recipe

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    Looking for a Beef Short Rib Recipe

    Any suggestions?

    #2
    Have you looked at the main site (below)? http://amazingribs.com/recipes/beef/BBQ_beef_ribs.html
    Texas-Style BBQ Beef Short Rib Recipe

    Here's how to make big, rich, juicy succulent BBQ Beef Short Ribs Texas style.
    1) Begin by removing the fat and the very tough silverskin from the top of the meat. All of it. No need to remove the membrane from the exposed side of the bones as you do with pork ribs. If you do the meat can fall off. Then cut slabs into individual bones or double bones if they did not come cut up. You can cook them in a slab, but they take a lot longer, and for Texas style, I like to expose more surface to heat to tenderize and develop brown Maillard reaction flavors. Inevitably some bones in a package have little meat and lotta fat. Trim them anyhow and cook them.
    2) Salt the meat in advance, up to 24 hours if possible. Lightly coat the meat with vegetable oil so the oil soluble spices in the rub will dissolve and penetrate a bit. Flavor the meat myBig Bad Beef Rub. Most commercial rubs are primarily salt. Meathead's Memphis Dust is too sweet. Do the tops and sides, and coat them generously. If you can, let the rub sit on the meat in the refrigerator for an hour or three or even overnight.
    3) If you wish, you can tenderize the meat with Jaccard. The narrow blades sever long tough strands and do a pretty good job. I normally do not recommend this tool because, if there is contamination on the surface of the meat, the blades can drive the bugs into the center and they will not be killed at 130°F, medium rare. But at 160°F the meat is pasteurized through and through.
    4) Setup your cooker for indirect cooking and preheat to 225°F, hot enough to kill bacteria but not too high to evaporate all the moisture.
    5) Put the meat on, bone side down, and add the wood. Oak is traditional in Texas and it makes sense because it is mild, but other woods work fine. I like cherry. Beef ribs seem to absorb smoke more quickly than other cuts, so remember, as always, go easy on the wood on your first cook. Too much smoke will ruin the meal. Add no more than 2 to 4 ounces on a tight cooker, double that if it leaks a lot. Put the lid on.
    You will not need to add more wood and you will not need to turn the meat over. Cook bone down all the way. The exact length of the cook depends on variables such as the composition of the meat (each steer is different).
    • 1" thick meat should hit 203°F in about 5 hours.
    • 1.5" thick meat should hit 203°F in about 7 hours.
    • 2" thick meat should hit 203°F in about 10 hours.
    Skip the Texas crutch. Wrapping it in foil or butcher paper will turn it to pot roast.
    Skip the sauce. A lot of folks like barbecue sauce on everything they grill, but sweet tomato based sauce just clashes with smoky beef. Save it for pork. I serve my beef ribs nekked. If you must use a sauce, try what they use in Texas, a thin beef stock based sauce, like my Texas Barbecue Mop-Sauce.





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      #3
      What are you cooking on?

      Comment


        #4
        Here's my 1st attempt using MH's recipe. The Intake / Exhaust values are recorded as % open, so 50 = half open, 100 = full open, etc.

        Good Luck!

        --Ed

        Click image for larger version

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          #5
          Hi everybody, i will also try my first beef short ribs tomorrow. About the cooking times in the recipe: Is the thickness measured with the bone, or just the sheet of meat on the bone?

          I will use my Maverick, but I need to know when to start

          Thanks in advance,

          Detlev

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            #6
            Start early, Figure with the bone. They benefit from a longer slower cook anyway. Resting in a faux cambro does them no harm, and the possibility of a second stall, for me typically about 198ish is probable. Try one and see how it pulls of the bone then. If it is too your liking, rest 'em. If there is some flyby membrane you don't like, let them go a bot longer. What cut are you using? Full length, or halves? One bone ribs? Two bones? Slabs? All this affects cooking times.

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              #7
              Thanks! Yeah, I discovered that by try and error

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