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Seasoning and Dry Brine Advice

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    Seasoning and Dry Brine Advice

    One of my son in laws turns 28 on Friday, and is coming over for some BBQ in the backyard. I offered him a choice of pulled pork, brisket, burgers, ribs, chicken, wings, or stir fry. He went with brisket, so I just pulled a 16 pound USDA prime packer out of the freezer and put it in the fridge. I'll trim and dry brine tonight, but expect it will still be at least partially frozen when I put it on the smoker late Thursday evening or early Friday. Probably start it at 10pm Thursday, running the cook at 225, then aim to finish around 2-3pm, and hold in cambro until dinner. Alternatively, I would put it on Friday morning and run the cook at 300F to get it done. Either way I will cramp this thing into the Weber Performer Deluxe and run it with the SNS and Party Q.

    I'm gonna roll with Hank's True BBQ Bonafide Beef Rub on this cook, since I've burned through my big jar of Big Bad Beef Rub, and am wanting to try something different this time. Plus I am too lazy to mix anything up, due to working 12 hour days most of this week, plus taking Yvonne back and forth to chemo, etc.

    So here comes my question... and a shout out to Henrik

    Since the Bonafide Beef rub includes salt, do I want to dry brine overnight with the rub, or still dry brine with kosher salt, and then apply the rub when I take the meat to the smoker?

    Thanks!

    And any thoughts on the low and slow overnight or hot and fast, get it done the day of the dinner? I've always done the low and slow, taking 14-16 hours to get a brisket this size done on the kettle.

    Jim
    Last edited by jfmorris; September 2, 2020, 07:43 AM.

    #2
    I believe someone asked Henrik about this recently. He said go ahead with a dry brine but reduce the salt amount by 1/2. If I remember correctly. I'd cook it as you've always done. He asked for your brisket because he likes it that way.

    Comment


    • jfmorris
      jfmorris commented
      Editing a comment
      HawkerXP thanks for the tip - I was inclined to dry brine anyway, and will just cut back a tiny bit on the salt if I go with the Bonafide Beef rub.

      As far as the rub, my son in law has has briskets I did with BBBR, and ones I did with salt/pepper/garlic, as well as ones where I used nothing but a big shaker of Montreal Steak seasoning. No complaints from him so far... he sampled rubs in my pantry not that long ago, pre-COVID, and liked the flavor of the Bonafide Beef rub.

    • Henrik
      Henrik commented
      Editing a comment
      You are correct, HawkerXP, that's the way to roll. jfmorris, thanks for using my beef rub! And dry brine with less salt overnight and you'll be fine.

    #3
    I agree with HawkerXP . That chunk of beef can handle the salt easily IMO. Have fun with the brisket cook.

    Comment


      #4
      Last brisket I went with a light covering of my dry rub then let her have it with Sucklebusters Best in Texas 1836 beef rub.
      If your son like pepper and his brisket on the hotter side give this a go.
      The one peeve I have with Sucklebusters is the amount of Sodium in they're rubs.
      This one is 34% so if your dry brining watch your salt amounts but overall pleased with this rub.

      Comment


      • jfmorris
        jfmorris commented
        Editing a comment
        I can't really go spicy for this cook, as there will be 8 folks working on this brisket, and none of the girls like things very spicy. I like hot and spicy though, and will keep an eye out for that rub.

      #5
      All I can add is that you may never use anything but Hank's Bonafide on a brisket after this.
      Last edited by CaptainMike; September 2, 2020, 09:34 AM.

      Comment


      • jfmorris
        jfmorris commented
        Editing a comment
        That is my hope! If only it came in bigger jars, haha. I may use up most of the shaker jar on this brisket.

      #6
      I use almost exclusively Henrik Hanks rubs when I do use a rub. That stuff is FABULOUS!!

      Less salt as mentioned and you are golden. Like said above. Do what you do as you normally do it. Don’t go adding variables and complications.

      its gonna be good!

      Comment


      • Henrik
        Henrik commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks my man 👊

      #7
      This reminded me to go and check my stock of Hank’s since we use it often, and did not want to be out for this weekend. It was time to restock so I’ve got several of each on the way now. Thanks for the reminder.

      Comment


      • Henrik
        Henrik commented
        Editing a comment
        Thank you 🙏

      #8
      Well, aside from cooking faster than expected, the 16 pound prime brisket is rolling along nicely this morning! I love the flavor of that Bonafide Beef rub! A little spicy, but that's good in the bark in my opinion.

      I decided to make Meathead's mop sauce, and used that to wet the brisket before applying the rub. I don't mop during cooking, but thought it would make a nice drizzle sauce or side sauce for serving this evening.

      Snapped this picture after flipping fat cap down - it ran from midnight to 7am fat cap up.

      Click image for larger version

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      Comment


        #9
        So question for the Pit on this cook.

        My plan was to be done around 2-3pm, and hold in cambro for serving at 6pm. Right now, at 10am, the brisket is up to 183F. I've been afraid to wrap as I don't want to cook faster. But I also don't want to dry the brisket out. Should I crutch, and just hold in cambro longer, or just cook naked the entire way to 205ish?

        Comment


          #10
          Never mind. Gonna wrap, since I always do that in the 170's, and let it finish when it finishes. I'll monitor it in cambro, and if it drops to 140F, move to a warm oven at 170F for holding.

          EDIT: re doing the probe placement after wrapping put the IT at 175, which is a little better...
          Last edited by jfmorris; September 4, 2020, 09:42 AM.

          Comment


            #11
            You can get an easy 6 hours in the cambro. I did a couple a while back that cooked super quick and I held them in a cooler wrapped in towels for 9 hours and they were still 145 degrees. If you were at 175 at 10 AM I would guess you have at least a couple more hours so you should be good to go.

            Comment


            • jfmorris
              jfmorris commented
              Editing a comment
              Thanks Joe. It went into the cambro around 1pm, so will be held until I pull it out and carve at 6pm. I left the Smoke probe in the meat, and put the probe on top of the cooler, and reset the low alarm to 145F. If it starts beeping, I'll move it to a warm oven.

            • jfmorris
              jfmorris commented
              Editing a comment
              After. 3 hours in cambro, the meat is down to 185 degrees! Must be a good cooler! It's a 40 quart Igloo that someone left at my house and never claimed, about 10 years ago...

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