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I'm sure a silly question

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    I'm sure a silly question

    I've been BBQ'ing for many years but more off then on. Would described myself as an "informed novice". Decided to make this summer my "Summer of BBQ". Last night I cooked in my Weber kettle a roast, maybe 3 pounds, indirect heat about 250 degrees. Intended to be med-rare; was medium (operator error) after only about 45 mins, which surprised me.Pulled it out too late. Was about 145 internal. My son recommended next time let the internal temp get to 180 or so. Yes, he said, it will be drier than med-rare at 135 but it will be much more tender because of the breakdown of collagens, etc. My simple question is this: Setting aside the quality and weight of the roast, does this make sense? Hope my question is clear.

    #2
    Well, it depends on the roast. What roast are we talking here- chuck, eye of round, sirloin, prime rib? In most cases though, I would have to disagree with your son here. I see where he's going though, he's partly right. At medium-rare you'll have your juiciest roast and going higher with many cuts will lead to a tender sliceable or shreddable end product, but that's only half the story!

    He might be thinking of the low & slow approach, which yes does break down tough fats and collagen. However this will not happen until much higher than 180. This begins happening at 190ish, and taking meats like pork butt, brisket, chuck roast up to 200-210 (or anywhere from 195 upward, really) then holding it there about an hour, gives it plenty of time to break down fats & collagen and make a delicious tender product which once again tastes juicy, but this time it's not really 'juice' so much as it is the rendered fats giving that sensation.

    This really only works with cuts that have those fats & collagens in them, like brisket, ribs, pork butt. Taking a lean roast like eye of round that high is an exercise in futility. In my opinion & experience 180 is that happy medium where you'll have neither, regardless of which cut it is, it will be dry and could be tough as nails.

    This article might be of interest to you: https://amazingribs.com/more-techniq...ooking-and-how

    Comment


    • Tom Ewing
      Tom Ewing commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you Huskee. Very, very helpful. I've cut & pasted your comment for my BBQ binder so I don't forget. #1 son--got his brains from his grandfather; skipped me sigh . . .--does the GREATEST job with ribs & pork butt on his Smoky Mountain. I'm a kettle guy. Bought a SnS. Terrific! Gonna get another roast tomorrow and try again. Determined by end of summer will graduate from "Informed Novice" to "Learned Novice". Anyway, thanks again. Glad I joined Pitmasters.

    #3
    Nope, not silly. Just depends on what yer after, although 180 doesn’t sound right. On one hand if ya brought to 205 would been nice, but if yer after MR you need to pull at 115 to 120 then sear it & bring it to 130 - 135, forget about the time, watch the the temp.

    PS. I had to look up what a gender reveal party was. Agin, silly, no.
    Last edited by FireMan; August 14, 2020, 03:24 PM.

    Comment


    • Huskee
      Huskee commented
      Editing a comment
      Oh I know what they are, it's a popular newer generation of moms & dads thing...I was just confused to why that was mentioned here...

    • Tom Ewing
      Tom Ewing commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you FireMan. Had already planned on doing as you suggested. You just confirmed. My goal is to smoke a beef roast that is sliceable rather than pulled. Think that will depend on both the quality of the meat and the cut (? i.e., chuck, etc). Kinda in the dark about the latter but will explore.

    • surfdog
      surfdog commented
      Editing a comment
      Ah yes...
      The 80+ Aunty said she was going to a sex party...
      A sex party?!
      After a few delicate questions...”It’s a gender reveal Aunty. Gender reveal.” LOL

    #4
    Wooo. I was working on this for a while. A lot of info to try and give. Huskee got what you need.

    Comment


      #5
      What he said. 👆 although I’ve been eating my beef at medium in recent months. Still delicious but cooked slow with prime cuts.

      180° though. What 👆he said.

      Comment


        #6
        I do round and sirloin roasts
        Aim for 130ish inside temp and wrap for a two hourish rest
        Have had great results so far

        Comment


        • Tom Ewing
          Tom Ewing commented
          Editing a comment
          Thank you.

        #7
        For cooking hind leg roasts for sliced medium rare roast beef first cook indirect low and slow until an internal temperature of 115F. Then direct over flame 5 minutes a side until internal of 125-128F at which time you pull and rest. Carryover will take you into the medium rare range.

        Comment


        • Tom Ewing
          Tom Ewing commented
          Editing a comment
          Thank you. I'll try it per your suggestion.

        #8
        "My goal is to smoke a beef roast that is sliceable rather than pulled"

        Again, it *Really* depends on the cut. As Huskee noted, you don't want to take a lean roast up that high. But you do want to take chuck high. The problem is that often things like chuck and brisket are actually tough when only cooked to sliceable temp ranges.

        Not to pile more stuff on, but you can do a sous vide then smoke (SVQ or QVQ) technique. The idea is to sous vide the cut for a LONG time (48+ hours) at or a little under your target temp to get things tender. Then chill. Then smoke to your target temp.

        There are good posts on this elsewhere but the basic idea is this:

        1) Season and vacuum seal your roast.

        2) Sous vide it for 48-72 hours at, say, 130F.

        3) pull it, shock it in ice water to drop the temp quickly. Then coat with rub and either refrigerate or smoke it back up to your final temp depending on your schedule.

        The davantage is that you can do this with cuts like chuck and brisket that you normally have to take to high temps in order to get them tender, but you can still have them at a lower temp.

        NOTE NOTE NOTE: This is not needed on already tender roast cuts.

        Comment


        • Tom Ewing
          Tom Ewing commented
          Editing a comment
          Hello Rickgregory. Thank you for your time responding. Interesting comment about sous vide. I'm a fan of the method. But my experience over the years (remember: an "informed" novice, but still a novice) is that smoke penetrates the meat only when raw. Once cooked (SV) too late. Yes. Can get grill marks and browning. But can get the same on a ribbed cast iron skillet. Did try SV & BBQ once. Didn't work but don't remember why. However, you do raise with me a fair point. Worth reconsidering. Thanks

        • rickgregory
          rickgregory commented
          Editing a comment
          Search for SVQ and QVQ here. Lot of info there.

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