Welcome!


This is a membership forum. As a guest, you can click around a bit. View 5 pages for free. If you would like to participate, please join.

[ Pitmaster Club Information | Join Now | Login | Contact Us ]

There are 4 page views remaining.

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Meathead Goldwyn Katz Pastrami

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Meathead Goldwyn Katz Pastrami

    The "Similar to Katz" recipe is great. The preparation iis definitely not for the faint of heart. I agree that the brine process should be at least 10-11 days. I pack it into a double hefty garbage bag with brine and load it into a big roaster which will be put in the refrigerator. Needs ROOM.

    Then, after a day of desalination, the dry curing should be at least two days. Make sure that the cure is crusty with lots of pepper.

    And by the way, I too visited Katz' Deli in the mid-80's. They still had the salamis hanging from the ceiling "send one to your son (wartime)"

    Here in L.A., Langers is supposed to be the best pastrami. This recipe when done right will beat them every time.

    I use a full packer brisket, at least 14-16 pounds. I buy it fresh from my butcher and I leave 1/4 inch of fat although 1/8 is recommended. I am also using a Pit Barrel which may be a little amateurish, but I can get good results using the Smoke temperature monitor that is sold by Thermo Works.

    What I believe is critical is observing temperatures. The Pit Barrel when lit will go to approx 275 degrees F, however that can be slowed with a little patience. A big "packer" will take at least 6-7 hours in the smoker. At the "stall" 150 degrees F, it will be taken out or if preferred, continue to 203 degrees F in the smoker. I prefer the steaming method the same day of smoking. I steam mine in a large foil roasting pan on a raised grate and use some reserved brine as the fluid, and of course covered (wrapped) with heavy duty Reynolds foil. Perhaps the reserved brine may introduce salt to some extent, however it can counter-react our colleague Meathead's remark that the product may need a little salting.

    I have introduced pictures of what I have done at various stages of the preparation, and the results are fantastic.

    I urge everyone to take the time to brine your own whether for corned beef or pastrami, if you have the room, patience and time. The results will be fantastic, and yes I would be able to open a deli, however working in a restaurant as a young kid in 1962 taught me that such a business is very joyful at times but not economic. I would rather see smiling faces from my family and grandkids.

    Be well and stay safe and yes Meathead, I understand the Yiddish expression at the bottom of your fine recipe.

    Kind regards
    Attached Files

    #2
    OMG that pastrami looks soooo good! OK now I have to give this a try. Made a corned beef a few years ago and smoked it but used a brisket rub rather than pastrami rub. It was good but a lot of trouble.

    Comment


      #3
      One wotd says it all. YUM. Is tht even a word? 🤣

      Comment


        #4
        All:

        Once again, 02.12..21 the "pastrami arrives!"

        Follow Meathead's recipe. This time, smoked to stall (150 F) then refrigerated and steamed to perfection on a steamer.

        For "Meathead" and all on our site, I have been to Katz' Deli, on Houston Street ("Howston") and also Langers in L.A. where I live. Our recipe rules.

        Please do yourselves a favor and acquire a brisket and brine it for at least 8 days, follow Meathead's instructions whether you bring it it 204 F in the smoker or steam it (which I did this time)

        I promise you it will be gone the next day with hungry family.

        Also look at the recipe for pastrami reuben sandwiches.

        All the best

        KINGBBQ
        Attached Files

        Comment


        • Jerod Broussard
          Jerod Broussard commented
          Editing a comment
          We use the calculator to give the minimum time required to cure.

        #5
        You may be singing to the choir. I think Meathead's Close To Katz' Pastrami recipe may be one of the most popular ones over on the free side. I know when topics have started here on The Pit asking which is the best Meathead recipe, pastrami is at the top as well.

        I make half a dozen pastramis a year. Some on my Pit Barrel Cooker (nothing amateurish about that cooker, as you joshed in your original post), and some on my WSCGC.

        Just as you say, the pastrami doesn't last long. Our kids ask for it all the time. Whenever we visit them, we often take a pastrami or a smoked bacon-covered meatloaf just to remind them there's more where that came from.

        Your pastrami cooks look awesome.

        Kathryn
        Last edited by fzxdoc; February 14, 2021, 07:48 AM.

        Comment


          #6
          Yep! This is my favorite recipe on the site. And it really does pay off to cure your own. I even make my own pickling spices, cause it really does make a huge difference.

          Comment


          • Spinaker
            Spinaker commented
            Editing a comment
            https://amazingribs.com/tested-recip...g-spice-recipe
            Yep, I use the one that MH posted to the Corned Beef recipe. It really makes a difference when you can get the ingredients fresh. I just go too the bulk section and get the small quantities I need. That is a huge money savor, over buying individual jars. 58limited

          • 58limited
            58limited commented
            Editing a comment
            Spinaker Thanks! The recipe I use for Kielbasa sausage calls for pickling spice, making my own for the recipe would be better that store bought I think. Have to grind it into powder for the sausage. Do you add any of the optional ingredients listed at the bottom of the recipe?

          • Spinaker
            Spinaker commented
            Editing a comment
            Yep, I add it all. I want full flavor. Anything you don't use, keep them in the little bags you buy them in and put those in a Ball jar to keep them fresh. You will notice the difference for sure. 58limited

          #7
          Just a quick note and BTW Happy Valentines Day!

          As I have said, I buy the full packer brisket from either my meat market (Hardy Meats in Studio City - Romeo, if you are in SoCal) or even at the local Pavilions (a/k/a Safeway, Albertosons) where I know everyone by name at the counter as they do mine.

          I strongly emphasize doing the brine @MH instructions (more or less depending on weight/thickness) and as our colleague Broussard posted, the brine time can be more depending on weight and size of the brisket. In my view, never any less that 8 days. It could be more. Then the desalinization for at least a day and then the dry rub again @ MH (thank you Goldwyn) which can be left in the fridge if you have room for two days or more.

          Note: If you are going to do this the long (right) way always make sure you are using pickling salt which is usually pink and not Himalyan salt which is not pickling salt. this is the key to preservation of the meat which has been used for millenia.

          Without repeating what everyone knows here, an accurate thermometer for both the kettle and internal temperature is very important. I still use Thermopop "smoke" but do not endorse any company particularly.

          Regarding the finished product and slicing:

          I have a pro meat slicing machine which is attached here. Never ever use this when the meat is hot or even warm.

          Next, in my personal preference I keep my knives (30 years now) in razor sharp condition and forgive the wood handles, but I am not a restaurant! (although my kids and grandchildren think so!) I do my own sharpening with a steel and often with a stone, and it is my opinion that the true pastrami / corned beef (or whatever meat you choose) should be hand cut. Just don't cut your hands. You will get into big trouble with an un-sharp knife, but be careful either way.

          You may find this humorous coming from a 48 year lawyer, but I started at 14 in a real deal restaurant 60 years ago and learned management of tasks, orderliness and handling of knives and utensils.

          My best to all our colleagues and hope you have a wonderful weekend

          KINGBBQ
          Attached Files

          Comment


            #8
            I found it interesting that they out source their pastrami to be smoked.

            Comment

            Announcement

            Collapse
            No announcement yet.
            Working...
            X
            false
            0
            Guest
            500
            ["pitmaster-my-membership","login","join-pitmaster","lostpw","reset-password","special-offers","help","nojs","meat-ups","gifts","authaau-alpha","ebooklogin-start","alpha","start"]
            false
            false
            {"count":0,"link":"/forum/announcements/","debug":""}
            Yes
            Rubs Promo
            Meat-Up in Memphis