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Lacquered Rib Eye

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    Lacquered Rib Eye

    Hi there,

    I came across this recipe here in Bon Appetit: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/lacquered-rib-eye. I am intrigued by "lacquer" that this creates but I'm not sure I completely trust their technique - especially the bit at the end on the indirect heat, where they're flipping every minute, and moving further/closer from the heat - what does flipping matter if it's indirect??? If you're flipping every minute is the cover off? It just doesn't make sense to me.

    Yet I feel like there's the gem of a good idea here. I've got some nice 1.5" Rib Eyes that I'm planning on cooking this weekend. Normally I use the better-than-steakhouse method, but was thinking of adapting it somehow with this lacquering technique.

    Anyone have ideas, suggestions, or experience doing something similar?

    Thanks!

    Ribby

    #2
    So they're saying sear on direct heat, then flip constantly on high heat.

    They had a bunch of recipes recently about "reverse marinating" - throwing the meat in a bag of marinade AFTER you grill it.


    They also suggest resting it for half an hour after it's done cooking.
    That sounds to me like a great way to have an over cooked luke warm steak.

    Personally, I'm skeptical.
    That sauce may make a great board sauce. I might do your normal reverse sear and add the sauce as you move from low to high heat.

    This seems to go against what I think about when grilling steak..... But blasphemy ribs seem backwards but come out delicious.

    So if you try it, let us know.

    Comment


      #3
      Here's my take. They're setting up a 2-zone fire, not using a deflector plate for true indirect cooking, so moving the meat closer to the burner or banked coals gets them some gentle direct heat. With that much sugar in the glaze it would be very tricky to get even caramelization without burning the glaze. They're also starting with a 2" thick hunk of meat so the internal temp rises more slowly. Getting the glaze caramelized but not burnt while getting the interior up to 120 all at the same time would take some practice. That said, it might just be worth the effort. Please let us know how this goes if you try it.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by BFlynn View Post
        I might do your normal reverse sear and add the sauce as you move from low to high heat.
        This is what I'm thinking - just basting it as I do the (reverse) sear.


        So if you try it, let us know.
        Absolutely - thanks!


        Comment


          #5
          Welcome to The Pit. I don't get it either. If you open the top every min, you might as well leave it open. Maybe if moving it closer to the fire I could see truning, but not far from direct heat. Flipping to baste makes sense, but over indirect, I don't think you are getting enough heat to cook it further...

          Maybe someone else understands...

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Chuck in Charlotte View Post
            Here's my take. They're setting up a 2-zone fire, not using a deflector plate for true indirect cooking, so moving the meat closer to the burner or banked coals gets them some gentle direct heat. With that much sugar in the glaze it would be very tricky to get even caramelization without burning the glaze. They're also starting with a 2" thick hunk of meat so the internal temp rises more slowly. Getting the glaze caramelized but not burnt while getting the interior up to 120 all at the same time would take some practice. That said, it might just be worth the effort. Please let us know how this goes if you try it.
            Hmm that makes sense. So probably blasting the baste with the direct heat during the sear would just burn it up.

            So maybe this: Do the normal thing except do the reverse sear a few degrees earlier than I normally would. Then, after the sear, baste, put on indirect again, wait a couple of degrees, flip, baste other side, wait till target temp, then done.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by RonB View Post
              Welcome to The Pit. I don't get it either. If you open the top every min, you might as well leave it open. Maybe if moving it closer to the fire I could see truning, but not far from direct heat. Flipping to baste makes sense, but over indirect, I don't think you are getting enough heat to cook it further...

              Maybe someone else understands...
              Thanks Ron. I think Chuck's take on what they mean by indirect is probably right.

              Comment


                #8
                Sorry, I want no part of sugar, vinegar, fish sauce & soy sauce on a ribeye. I use the two sauces time to time in my cookin, NOT on a ribeye, especially sugar.
                Last edited by FireMan; June 12, 2020, 05:22 PM.

                Comment


                • Bkhuna
                  Bkhuna commented
                  Editing a comment
                  What he said.

                • Troutman
                  Troutman commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Exactly, give me the beef

                • klflowers
                  klflowers commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Yep

                #9
                The first step of that is gonna stink up your house horribly. Heating soy sauce and fish sauce to a simmer.

                that’s a good time to have a side burner on your grill.

                Comment


                  #10
                  You can throw that one right out the window. I'm married to an Asian and fish sauce, which I have to smell all the time anyway, makes me nauseous, much more do I despise the flavor. Now having said that, who won't eat that steak ????

                  Click image for larger version

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                  Comment


                  • BFlynn
                    BFlynn commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Fish sauce always smells terrible. I find a little goes a long way in the occasional dish. I've had a bottle for 4 years. The few times I use it, I'm glad I have it..... But it's not often.

                    Maybe some other glaze......

                    I have mixed feelings about glazing a steak. My general goal is to not screw up all the cow's hard work.

                    But a glaze could be tasty.......

                    Intrigued enough to encourage someone else to give it a try

                  #11
                  BFlynn what I have found in my Chinese & other Asiatic cookin I’m only usin a TBSP or 2 at a time, to be used sparingly. Maybe the Man of Trout has some more input. A bottle will last me 6 to 12 mos.
                  Still NOT on a ribeye!

                  Comment


                  • BFlynn
                    BFlynn commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Yeah, that's about all I use it. A few Tbsp here or there.... Maybe once a month..... Maybe not that often

                  #12
                  I'm giving it a shot tonight - we're all fairly adventurous eaters, and I honestly don't see it messing up the steak that badly even in a worse case scenario...yeah fish sauce does stink up the place (already made the sauce) but it dissipates fairly quickly and doesn't bother any of us too badly. I'll let you all know how it goes!

                  Comment


                    #13
                    I ended up trying it the other night with some 1.5" Ribeyes. It definitely wasn't bad - not overpowering or weird or anything. It added a bit of caramelized sweetness and tang to the outside of the steak. The steaks themselves were excellent, I'm just not sure if this added much, though it wasn't a ton of effort. My wife's verdict was that it was like a "fancy A1" and that it would maybe help a lesser cut but not necessary on really nice well-marbled ribeyes.

                    Comment


                      #14
                      The verdict is in, good work ribbyrobby !

                      Now that yer definitely part of the group, dare I say, WibbyWobby. 😎
                      Last edited by FireMan; June 15, 2020, 03:16 PM.

                      Comment


                      • ribbyrobby
                        ribbyrobby commented
                        Editing a comment
                        You dare! Thanks!

                      #15
                      Thanks for going ahead and giving it a try, and letting us know how it turned out.

                      Comment


                      • ribbyrobby
                        ribbyrobby commented
                        Editing a comment
                        No problem!

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