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Brisket and the oven....

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    Brisket and the oven....

    So, in the time I've read this site I've heard a few things bandied about as general wisdom. To wit:

    1) Meat only takes on smoke for the first few hours.

    2) Low and slow is best for tough cuts like brisket.

    3) Brisket at 225F-275F is the way to go meaning it will take 12+ hours most of the time.

    But wait... if all of the above are generally true... why not do this? Smoke a brisket for 3-5 hours. If #1 is accurate, then it's taken about as much smoke as it's going to. Remove it, wrap it, plop it in the oven where temps are much easier to control (esp where it's cool/cold).

    I know that this has little of the BBQ mystique, but... so? If this doesn't work, then one of the assertions above must not be right or is, at best, only partially correct.

    Discuss. Over coffee. Or beer.

    #2
    Somebody is stirring the pot. Begin.

    Comment


    • rickgregory
      rickgregory commented
      Editing a comment
      Moi? *innocentface*

    #3
    You can drink a lot more beer outside on the deck when you have the “tending the cooker” excuse....

    Comment


    • smokin fool
      smokin fool commented
      Editing a comment
      I have a beer thinking about whether to have a beer or not.

    • xaugievike
      xaugievike commented
      Editing a comment
      well hell....looks like it's about time for me to start doing some thinking

    • Steve R.
      Steve R. commented
      Editing a comment
      Great point. Sitting around drinking beer while the brisket is in the oven would completely blow your tending the cooker excuse for not doing anything going forward. If you do this, do it when the wife isn't around.

    #4
    This is a method already suggested by even some big names in BBQ such as Harry Soo. The temperatures may vary, but the process remains approximately the same. One issue that remains debated is the texture of the brisket via each method.
    Last edited by Donw; February 29, 2020, 11:00 AM.

    Comment


    • crazytown3
      crazytown3 commented
      Editing a comment
      As Mr. Soo says, "BTUs are BTUs".

    #5
    Originally posted by Donw View Post
    This is a method already suggested by even some big names in BBQ such as Harry Soo. The temperatures may vary, but the process remains approximately the same. One issue that remains debated is the texture of the brisket via each method.
    But what's the logic for varying texture? If we say it's that it's wrapped in the oven... don't wrap. Heat is heat, so that can't be it. I can think of a couple of factors but... I want to see what others say.

    Comment


    • ItsAllGoneToTheDogs
      ItsAllGoneToTheDogs commented
      Editing a comment
      Many ovens are a giant cooler with heat, unless you have one with a fan, your meat likely wont form the same bark it would outside. I'm not a huge fan of oven made meatloaf, but I actually like it a lot from the grill because if the texture difference via cooking vessel.

    #6
    Try it both ways at the same time. Compare. Done.

    Comment


    • rickgregory
      rickgregory commented
      Editing a comment
      Where's the fun in that when I can get outrage here for free?

      I'm also curious because the general wisdom would seem to suggest that there's no reason to smoke for 12-20 hours. Yet we do.

    • smokin fool
      smokin fool commented
      Editing a comment
      When I do a brisket in the oven its a 12-14 hour cook at 225-250 wit a 4 hour rest

    #7
    I get your point about only retaining smoke for the first 3-5 hours and the more controllable temps the oven offers.
    Out on a limb, if you want a lot of bark it may suffer depending on how much bark formed in the first 3-5.
    Double wrapping in the oven also "steams' the meat more than cooking it like on an outdoor grill so there would be a different texture.
    My .02 cents.

    Comment


    • rickgregory
      rickgregory commented
      Editing a comment
      But, as I commented earlier, if wrapping is felt to affect the texture, just don't wrap (or not until the stall... basically replicate the process you use in the smoker).

      as to bark - that's heat, not smoke, yes? I mean, I've slow roasted pork butt and gotten bark.
      Last edited by rickgregory; February 29, 2020, 01:33 PM.

    #8
    I can see nothing wrong with this logic, last time I did 3-2-1 baby back ribs it was cold out so I smoked them my Traeger, then tented them in Alum foil and cooked in the oven and I finished them on the gas grill. They were very good. I don’t do brisket that often now, I prefer to do chuck roasts instead.

    Comment


      #9
      You can cook a brisket indoors just like you do in your grill/smoker. You won’t get the smoke flavor, of course, but other than that the meat doesn’t know where the heat comes from. One difference with respect to bark though: in a well designed offset smoker you have a high air flow, meaning it will build bark differently than your indoor oven. Nowadays most modern ovens can be set to ‘hot air’, so load that brissie up, spritz every now and then and wait for the stall.

      Comment


      • rickgregory
        rickgregory commented
        Editing a comment
        Ok but... If the assertion is that meat stops taking on smoke after the first few hours, then it doesn't matter to the smoke flavor where it's cooked after hour 4 or 5.

        For airflow.. convection oven?
        Last edited by rickgregory; February 29, 2020, 01:33 PM.

      • Henrik
        Henrik commented
        Editing a comment
        #1 is a myth: as Meathead writes: Does meat stop taking on smoke?
        There is a popular myth that at some point the meat stops taking on smoke. Sorry, but meat does not have doors that it shuts at some time during a cook. See here: https://amazingribs.com/more-techniq...wood-smoke-and

      • grantgallagher
        grantgallagher commented
        Editing a comment
        Im hardly one to dispute meathead, but having done the svq or qsv a few times i cant say that ive noticed a ton of difference in smoke flavors vs straight q. Wouldnt you expect an overwhelming smoke flavor if a brisket or chuckie actually took on smoke for 8-14 hours?

        Obviously a lot of variables here but if it is truly a myth then its one im definitely guilty of believing

      #10
      I have done this with varying degrees of success. Smoke for a few hours, then put it in the oven to finish. Here are a couple things I have run into.

      1) Leave the oven around 250. The meat continues to cook just as in the smoker and takes about the same time. The one real drawback is that I can create a much more moist atmosphere in my smoker than I can my oven. Wrapping in foil can solve this in the oven..

      2) If I turn the oven heat up to cook the brisket faster after smoking, the fat does not seem to render out as well or as completely I should say. This changes the texture of the meat somewhat. It is definitely not bad, but is different. If you are serving to those who know their BBQ, they will tell the difference.

      3) Finishing in the oven does have the advantage of being able to catch all those awesome juices easier so that they can be used in various au jus items.

      The bottom line is that there is no "perfect" way. If you love what you are doing and and enjoy it with others, then you are doing it right. Once you become known for your craft, then others will say that Henrik does it the "right" way. Then you can just smile at them and nod, allowing them to think all of your BBQ wisdom is really meat-magic.

      Keep smoking my friend.

      Comment


        #11
        If you are wrapping it doesn’t matter where you finish the cook.

        Comment


          #12
          I’ve done brisket this way. It works. But I keep it in the pit longer - make sure it’s past the stall, and the bark has completely formed. That’s the point at which I wrap...which is also the point to stick it in the oven. Once it’s done (probe tender) then turn the oven down to warm and let it rest.

          This is my preferred method for making great brisket and still getting some sleep!

          Comment


            #13
            You may have the smoke you want but not the bark. I'll leave it on the grill or in PBC until I get the color I want, wrap or put in sealed foil pan finish and hold in the oven.

            Comment


            • rickgregory
              rickgregory commented
              Editing a comment
              Ok but why would you think that the bark on the smoker will be better than in the oven?

            • Henrik
              Henrik commented
              Editing a comment
              The smoke improves bark, plain and simple.

            • HawkerXP
              HawkerXP commented
              Editing a comment
              I don't know why but a roast beef, a chicken, a turkey cooked in the oven certainly does not come out looking like one started on a grill / smoker / barrel. Like Henrik just said smoke.

            #14
            That would a good side by side test to do as pkadare suggested...

            Comment


              #15
              I don't think results would be that different . Just less fun in the oven!

              Comment

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