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Fat content different beef cuts

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    Fat content different beef cuts

    I experimenting with different cuts of beef for a custom burger blend. I know chuck is 80/20 but I'm unable to find a chart showing the fat content of different cuts of meat to ensure a proper lean fat ratio so I can add fat as necessary. I'm experimenting with combinations of chuck, oxtails, short ribs, hanger steak, brisket etc. Does anyone know where I can find such a chart?

    #2
    Not sure that I've seen what you are asking for. If you are grinding your own, just go by weight. Separate the meat and fat (as much as reasonable) before grinding and get your ratio right then grind it all together. I supplement with fat I've saved from trimming brisket and rib roasts

    I would concentrate more on the flavor and texture differences between cuts to figure out what you This may be a good starting point : https://aht.seriouseats.com/2009/10/...s-of-beef.html .

    Comment


      #3
      How do you know chuck is 80/20? Maybe that's true in some broad sense but if I take a piece of chuck from a grass fed animal and compare it to a wagyu equivalent it could be 10-15% difference. I think the only way to ensure a true blend is to do what lemayp says, grind your own. No two animals are ever alike.

      Comment


      • texastweeter
        texastweeter commented
        Editing a comment
        Agreed. Chuck from our grass fed Angus out at the ranch are as lean or leaner than choice or even select sirloin.

      • HouseHomey
        HouseHomey commented
        Editing a comment
        Yep

      #4
      I’ve been chasing burgers a very long time. First start with cuts and see what flavor, texture etc... that you like. Then play with ratios. Eventually you will come to
      things like cook process, tooth feel, mouth feel, crunch, back end flavors of rare, mid rare and all kinds of other things.

      What you are asking for does not exist as every single piece of meat is different and every cook is different.

      Please if you find anything like that I would be very interested.

      Comment


      • texastweeter
        texastweeter commented
        Editing a comment
        The burger whisperer speaketh!

      • tbob4
        tbob4 commented
        Editing a comment
        What would you recommend for him as his base cut and grade given he seems to want to grind leaner cuts into it?

      • HouseHomey
        HouseHomey commented
        Editing a comment
        tbob4 I don’t see the lean comment above? I’m not sure what “ ensure proper ratio” means. Could be lean I guess. All those cuts mentioned are not leaner cuts.

      #5
      For what it's worth, I like a mix of short rib, and skirt with extra fat mixed in. Can't go wrong with straight Chuck or brisket with a little suet mixed in to get her nice and greasy! Oh and burgers with some rehydrated dry age pelicle (think Peter Lugars) are great too!
      Last edited by texastweeter; January 26, 2020, 08:07 PM.

      Comment


        #6
        I don't think the OP was asking for precision but something like "Choice chuck is around N%, Choice short ribs are around Y%" etc.

        I mean, we can broadly say that chuck of a given grade has more fat than, say, top round of that same grade.

        Comment


        • HouseHomey
          HouseHomey commented
          Editing a comment
          I just reread the post. I’m not certain something like that exists. I wonder what criteria inspectors use??? Perhaps try the USDA? Has me thinking though.

        #7
        Thanks to all for the input. After further research I was able to locate this at,

        https://www.foodrepublic.com/2015/05...illing-season/

        Chuck (80/20): When old-school butchers refer to “hamburg,” they’re speaking of chuck, and even more specifically, chuck roll. It’s as classic as you can get, yielding a high-fat burger that comes across as juicy rather than greasy. Most ground beef — and burgers — come from the chuck, so this cut is an obvious choice. Hands down, it’s our favorite cut to grind. At the grocery store, look for the slab labeled “chuck pot roast.” Grind it up and you’ll instantly think burger.

        Brisket (70/30): This blue-collar cut is popular for boiled dinners, delicatessens, and barbecue joints. Its distinct flavor profile and high-fat content will yield a rich burger with a humble meat-and-potatoes attitude.

        Rib (70/30): Another high-fat cut, this primal slab produces some real burger beauties. Our favorite rib cuts for grinding are short rib, flanken, and ribeye cap.

        Plate (90/10): The plate is just below the ribs. This cut yields both skirt and hanger steaks. These are slightly tougher cuts with buttery yet tangy flavor profiles, similar to the strong malolactic notes of a tart, velvety red wine. The sophisticated flavors of the plate lend themselves nicely to a fancier burger night.

        Short Loin (85/15): If you win the lottery (and suddenly feel like a ridiculous asshole), we recommend sourcing our favorite cut from the short loin: a dry-aged New York strip steak. Dry aging produces an umami-packed profile that comes from an enzymatic breakdown of muscle. You just can’t find that flavor anywhere else. Most importantly, dry aging yields the amino acid glutamate. (It’s the same glutamate found in monosodium glutamate — the dreaded MSG! — and gives that buzz that Chinese takeout provides without the cancer scare.) So if you’ve got money to burn and you’re looking for a burger to give you some zip, this cut is for you.

        Flank (93/7): Remember when London broil was cheap? We do. Back then, chefs were doing tasty things with flank, like marinating, charring, and shaving it so thin the meat just melted in your mouth. Even though the price of this cut has skyrocketed in the last ten years, it’s still a worthwhile component in your burger blend. That’s right, bring back the London broil, baby!

        Sirloin (85/15): The sirloin can be complicated. There’s sirloin, tenderloin, top sirloin, and bottom sirloin. Flavors and marbling vary greatly throughout the sirloin region, so for burger-grinding purposes, we suggest sticking to the bottom. Bottom sirloin is well marbled and packed with two of our favorite cuts, both for grilling and grinding: flap meat, also known as steak tips (and typically only available on the East Coast) and tri-tip (usually only available on the West Coast).

        Round (93/7): Cuts from the round are lean and cheap. They’re a great go-to when you need to adjust your protein-to-fat ratio. Typical cuts include top round, bottom round, and eye round.

        Shank (96/4): The shank is cut from either the hind shank or fore shank (or the calves and forearms). These muscles are constantly used, which gives them a beefy flavor but a tough consistency. Such tough cuts tend to be best for braising, but remember, a few grinds of even the toughest meats will yield a tender, melt-in-your-mouth texture. We love the shank because it adds a rich and gelatinous beefiness to our burgers. Be sure to pair this lean cut with fattier cuts.

        Oxtail (85/15): Sometimes we just love getting funky with our burger grinds. That’s where oxtail comes in. Similar to the shank, this cut is very tough and gelatinous. It’s also high in fat and low in cost. Pick up some tail next time you want to try something a little different.

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