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First brisket and question about how long to hold internal meat temp to 203 degrees?

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    First brisket and question about how long to hold internal meat temp to 203 degrees?

    I just cooked my first brisket (14lbs) using a xxl Big Green Egg with a BarbQgurus Cyberq pit controller to hold the food probe temp to a certain degree.
    I trimmed the extra fat off to where i had about 1/4+ in in places, some meat showing through.
    I then injected about 16 oz of beef broth into the brisket, not counting what shot out around the kitchen, and hope it did it properly. (Looking for a video on proper injection technique) I then salted the brisket with Kosher salt about 1.5 hours then put on a rub found here on this site. ( I realize now I possible got the injection and salting out of order)
    I put some dry rub on the brisket like described here and then put the brisket into the egg at 225 and smoked with mesquite for about 2 hours. Once I had the internal temp to 160 ( I think that is what it was) I took out and wrapped well with foil and put on for 14 hours with the internal temp slowly climbing to the 203 and maintaining that temp, (around 206) for about the last 6 hours. There was a lot of juice at the bottom of the foil and the top was very wet so I put it back into the egg for about 15 minutes to try to dry the top a bit.
    While moving the brisket from one tray to another I can see where it is very loose and could be pulled apart with little effort. I now have it in the oven, off, to cool down a bit to make for better slicing.
    I had read on here where 190-203 was the magic zone to get the meat to or to hold it at. But what I am unsure of is how long would you want to hold the brisket to that temp?


    Is there anything else that you noticed from my routine that needs to be tweaked or modified drastically?
    Thanks for any help,.
    Phil

    #2
    When it hits probe tender, which will occur at +/- 203 internal, it is best to put it to rest in a warm environment, aka cambro or faux cambro, and allow it to slowly cool off for some time. (1-3 hours is typical). Maintaining it at 200+ will no doubt tenderize the ever-living chrud out of that thing. Not a bad thing, unless you don't want your slices falling apart.

    Some low grade cheap briskets might still hold together.....

    I like to salt aka dry-brine 24-48 hours in advance. I HATE injecting, therefore I don't.

    I also like to wrap on bark, which puts the wrapping usually around 170-180 internal. Although I have had some get wrapped at 190+.
    Last edited by Jerod Broussard; February 15, 2015, 09:13 AM.

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks for that info. So if its a good grade of meat then once you hit that internal meat temp ( thickest part) it could be pulled? And if that is true then the lesser the grade of meat then just keep it at the same internal temp longer to make more tender assuming that there is some sliding rule of thumb between holding that temp and grade of meat.
      Wrapping on bark,..going to look that up.
      Buying this brisket was a last minute decision yesterday and fast tracked it.

      Comment


      • Jerod Broussard
        Jerod Broussard commented
        Editing a comment
        The only time I get fixated on internal temp is when I'm cooking a lot of Select briskets that will ultimately be chopped. Most, cooled, then reheated and chopped. I will take all those to 205, and that is enough for me.
        Last edited by Jerod Broussard; February 15, 2015, 12:57 PM.

      #4
      Phil, while injecting, try to place the needle with the grain of the meat. And push the injection in slow. You won't have nearly as many squirters flying around the kitchen. However, your always going to have them when you are injecting.

      I let my briskets roll unwrapped for as long as possible to help build more bark. Even when the meat hits the stall, I will let it sit there for a couple of hours to see if I can power through it. If I can, then I wrap mine at about 175 to 180 F. If I get a brisket that just won't budge then I will wrap it. Unlike what a lot of guys/gals do on here, I don't wrap mine super tight. I let some of the steam escape so its not so much of a steam bath in there. I want to get as much firm bark as possible.

      I have also gone to not putting water in the water pan in my Kamado. I was having problems with getting a really good bark because of all of the moisture in the cooker. So now I use sand to help regulate the temps and this has made a word of difference. Keep in mind, you should have mastered your temp control with your BGE before trying this. The sand will help to level out temps but there is nothing stopping it from getting way hotter than 212 F like you would get with water in the pan.

      I take my brisket off the cooker at 202 F, I wrap it tightly, if not already done ,then I put it in my cooler for at least 3 hours to rest. I've never used the oven, but I know a lot of guys do. I really think this is important. If you wrap it in a towel and put it in a good, solid cooler, it will stay hot for hours and the meat comes out incredible. Just make sure the internal meat temp doesn't drop below 165 F in the cooler. I use a YETI cooler for mine and that thing could keep a brisket hot for days! So I've never had problem with them getting cooler than 165 F.

      I hope this answers some of your questions!!

      Good Luck

      -John

      Comment


        #5
        Thanks John,...I have not put any water in the Egg yet. I do think that I should try to let it cook a little longer prior to wrapping or "crutching" to get a better bark. I did not notice any plateau as far as holding at 150 or so. It seemed like it just sailed right on by that temp and slowly headed toward the 203.
        I think what happened with the injector was that I switched from the single exit needle at the end to the multi port side exits and pressed the trigger while some were hanging out of the meat. Nothing on the ceiling that I could notice. ha
        Phil

        Comment


          #6
          I would suggest using wood other than mesquite. MH says here: http://amazingribs.com/tips_and_tech...n_of_wood.html

          I avoid mesquite. It can be harsh, bitter, and pungent. Hickory is the tried and true mate for pork, but some people find it too aggressive and occasionally it can taste bitter. Fruit woods tend to impart a sweetness, but this may just be the power of suggestion because we know fruit to be sweet.

          That being said, I have never used mesquite so I am just going on what MH suggests

          Good luck

          Comment


            #7
            Originally posted by FLBuckeye View Post
            I would suggest using wood other than mesquite. MH says here: http://amazingribs.com/tips_and_tech...n_of_wood.html

            I avoid mesquite. It can be harsh, bitter, and pungent. Hickory is the tried and true mate for pork, but some people find it too aggressive and occasionally it can taste bitter. Fruit woods tend to impart a sweetness, but this may just be the power of suggestion because we know fruit to be sweet.

            That being said, I have never used mesquite so I am just going on what MH suggests

            Good luck
            I read most of the info on that link. thanks.
            I noticed He said
            "Never use lumber scraps. Some lumber is treated with chemicals that are poisonous. Never use wood that has been painted. By the way, that's one of the reasons I don't use lump charcoal. You can see lumber scraps in there and it makes me wonder how careful they are to prevent treated lumber from getting in the bag.
            Of course I agree about the lumber scraps but if he does not use lump what does he use? I have a BGE and have been told to only use this.
            ​ Another issue I see with the BGE is that with the plate setter in place for more indirect heat it makes it difficult to put more wood chips over the fire with the fire in the center. I see now from that article that it might be best to get some block wood for something like brisket or any other meat that takes longer to cook. I'm thinking now of trying one of those home made aluminum foil containers to spread the love. This would allow me to load it up and get it next to the fire.
            Ha,.. I'm assuming everyone starts their fire in the center of the BGE but now after reading this site for a few days I'm wondering what If anything I am doing right.

            Also with the plate setter in place and the grate in place over the place setter it leaves very little room for smoke to "get underneath" the meat to smoke properly. I'm thinking that possible I should have a extra grate on top of the one I have now to give it a little rise so that the smoke will flow a nit more under the meat. Ideas, thoughts?


            Phil

            Comment


            • FLBuckeye
              FLBuckeye commented
              Editing a comment
              He uses Kingsford Blue bag charcoal because it is a consistent product. Harry Soo only uses Kingsford. I have used lump before but have returned to the blue bag. Helps when it goes on sale at Lowe's and Hoe Depot for $10 for two 20 lb. bags usually during the Memorial day and Labor day weekends.
              That being said, I don't have BGE so I don't know about issues with cooking with it. My bro has one and loves it.
              The wood can be anywhere in your cooker. As it smolders, it circulates throughout the cooking chamber. Proximity isn't important IMO

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