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Prime Rib Cap off or Cap on?

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    Prime Rib Cap off or Cap on?

    Meathead recently posted on Twitter a link to an article and videos - https://amazingribs.com/tested-recip...r-beef-roasts/ - he and Jenny Johnson prepping a prime rib roast. On the bottom video with Jenny, he leaves the cap on. In the more technical video further up in the article, he removes the cap and talks about the the fat can insulate the rest of the roast and cook unevenly. So...how do you make the call to leave it on or off?

    #2
    I don’t think there’s any right or wrong answer to this one. Fat cap on trim down to probably a quarter inch leaves all that delicious fat on there and that adds flavor. However the other argument is if you take the fat cap off you were exposed to a lot of meat that can be seasoned and caramelized. So either way I think you’d come out a winner.

    Comment


      #3
      I remove almost all the cap nowadays as explained here https://amazingribs.com/more-techniq...netrates-meat/

      Comment


      • jsaniga
        jsaniga commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks Meathead, I will take a look at that article.

      #4
      I like the video near the top of this article:

      https://amazingribs.com/tested-recip...ide-prime-rib/

      Meathead shows how to break it down in the video. I did this recently, and got a LOT of meat from a 15 pound standing rib roast. I cooked the "eye of ribeye" with about all the exterior fat removed, just the way he shows in that video, and was very pleased with the results. All the slices were pretty much fully edible with no fat for folks to cut off on their plate, and I got a lot of compliments on the crunchy bark that was around each slice. If you leave the fat on, you won't have folks eating any of the spicy crust.
      Last edited by jfmorris; December 23, 2021, 01:31 PM.

      Comment


      • Dr. Pepper
        Dr. Pepper commented
        Editing a comment
        And....that's why I plan on cutting our big bone-in primal rib roast (Costco) into thick steaks. Best of both worlds: Meat on the sides with Maillard reaction, and fat around the side for those of us who like that as well.

      • jfmorris
        jfmorris commented
        Editing a comment
        That's an easy answer...

      #5
      Jeeez. I just picked up 2 USDA Prime 7 bone Beef roasts. Total price $1300+!!!!!! Double last year.

      Comment


      • gboss
        gboss commented
        Editing a comment
        Holy moly! Too bad you couldn’t grab a sale like this one:

        https://pitmaster.amazingribs.com/fo...ib-roast-sale/

      • jsaniga
        jsaniga commented
        Editing a comment
        Ah, wow! I wasn't thrilled with the Choice boneless outs I got from Costco for my smoke. One had a huge chunk/streak of internal fat that for sure would have caused on uneven cook. Did some surgery and tied that one back together. Overall they came out pretty good.

      • texastweeter
        texastweeter commented
        Editing a comment
        Boneless is $19-$20 a lb here this year, up $5 from last year.

      #6
      The Meathead method works well, so does How to Perfectly Cook a Prime Rib | Chef Jean-Pierre - YouTube
      Two different processes two different outcomes. I have gotten Positive BBQ Reviews (PBR) for both.

      Comment


      • Dr. Pepper
        Dr. Pepper commented
        Editing a comment
        Love Chef Jean-Pierre. And, he basically is repeating our well accepted reverse sear mantra. With what I like to call a 'dry pseudo sous-vide.' His resting for 45 minutes before searing is great advice. Also makes planning the dinner easier, since you don't have to fret the minutes if you start early enough and let it sit.

      #7
      Originally posted by Meathead View Post
      Jeeez. I just picked up 2 USDA Prime 7 bone Beef roasts. Total price $1300+!!!!!! Double last year.
      Delicious, but on price Ouch!

      Comment


      • bbqLuv
        bbqLuv commented
        Editing a comment
        Some people have more money than cents.

      #8
      The Grillfather putting the reverse sear on two prime rib roasts last Monday. Did one using Mrs. O'Leary's Cow Crust and one using Meathead 's all purpose beef rub. Both were really good, but the Cow Crust really does help make a great crust to bite into. Thanks for the tips everyone!
      Attached Files

      Comment


      • Meathead
        Meathead commented
        Editing a comment
        THEY LOOOK AWESOME!

      #9
      This year for NYE I got 4 bones dry-aged (7 lb bone-in) ... I left the bones and spinalis on this time, but as I trimmed the fat it smelled so good that I decided to render it. Then my friend pointed out we had enough rendered to use for Yorkshire pudding...this was a good meal.

      Comment


        #10
        I for one trim off almost all the fat. I'm a bark afficionado, and even though I speak fondly of the fat cap, none of my guests ever touch it. So, bottom line: trim it off before, build that awesome bark, and everyone's happy!

        Comment


        • ecowper
          ecowper commented
          Editing a comment
          I trim fat cap aggressively on everything for this very reason. Brisket, Rib Roast, Tri-Tip, whatever. If I leave the fat cap, even a little, people cut it off and lose all that amazing bark and flavor.

        #11
        I remove it now and keep it for a treat for myself. I only like those other people so much, the ribs and cap are mine!

        Comment


          #12
          I am in the less fat more bark camp 😛

          Comment


          • ecowper
            ecowper commented
            Editing a comment
            Besides, all that fat makes lovely tallow

          • Dr. Pepper
            Dr. Pepper commented
            Editing a comment
            I think you can fool the public: leave about 3-4 mm of fat, and it becomes part of the tasty bark. It's not bark separated from the meat by a cm of fat. It's fried.

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