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Smoked meatloaf questions

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    Smoked meatloaf questions

    I'm going to try this recipe tomorrow

    http://www.theblackpeppercorn.com/20...oked-meatloaf/

    Questions:

    1. I'm doing this on my WSM and will use meat dust for the rub. What's the ideal smoker temp for bark formation? At that temp approx how long will it take to get to 160?

    2. Should I saute the veggies before forming the loaf? I'm worried about the onions overpowering the flavor. I love cooked onions but not a huge fan of raw.

    3. What internal temp is good for glazing with bbq sauce?

    4. Water in the water pan or leave it dry?

    #2
    I find that you need to get to at least 300 on meatloaf to actually get that stinkin' thing done already.

    Most will bake at 350 for at least 1-1.5 hours.

    Obviously I am talking about the usual thickness with respect to a loaf pan.

    I use mini-loaf pans (line with plastic, loaf comes right out onto the grate) and find it still takes some time.

    Once it gets to 150 you should be able to glaze. Any time the food is done, and the glaze has not caramelized to my liking, I just go over it with a handheld propane torch to make it all bubble a little.

    I HATE onions in meatloaf. I'd rather just sautee them and pile them on top when it hits the plate.

    Not sure if water will make a really big difference.
    Last edited by Jerod Broussard; August 15, 2015, 03:20 PM.

    Comment


      #3
      I cook mine to an IT of 135F then glaze with ketchup/sugar sauce under the broiler for 8 minutes, glaze again and back in for another 8. I cook at 375F and the first part takes about an hour. I usually do it in my Breviile Smart Oven, but I have also done it on the smoker. No big flavor difference at that temp.

      I also saute the veggies before putting into the loaf - onions (sorry Jerod), celery and carrots. I also don't use a loaf pan but just make a free form loaf - the loaf is on a rack so the grease drips away.

      Click image for larger version

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      This last one was cooked on the Rec Tec, first two in the BSO.

      Attached Files

      Comment


        #4
        I just did one, I did it at 325. It was barkin' like a bulldog.

        Comment


        • Jerod Broussard
          Jerod Broussard commented
          Editing a comment
          Mosca the cook that caused/allowed me to find amazingribs, was an all mesquite chunk for fuel cook for meatloaf with temps hitting 500 degrees near the firebox. I finally moved the meatloaf to the other end of the offset. Deepest, richest bark I've ever got a hold of.

        #5
        Meat loaf with 3 strips of bacon, on the kettle, @ 375* for an hour and twenty minutes, until 160* internal. Glazed with Heinz Simply Ketchup.

        Last edited by Munch; August 15, 2015, 07:53 PM.

        Comment


        • David Parrish
          David Parrish commented
          Editing a comment
          That looks like your kettle's inaugural cook. =)

        • Munch
          Munch commented
          Editing a comment
          Maybe? 😁

        #6
        Here are the pics from my meatloaf cook this past weekend. I sauted the veggies before I formed the loaf. Also, I used about 3 tsp of meat dust on this bad boy. I cooked it at 325 for about 2 hours until it hit 165. I glazed once it hit 135 and it took about 30 to 45 mins to finish from there. Had a pretty decent bark. Probably the best meatloaf I have ever tasted.

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        Comment


        • JeffJ
          JeffJ commented
          Editing a comment
          It looks great! What kind of wood did you use and how much? I have done a few loaves on my Performer and went minimal with the wood. Ground beef seems to pick up a lot of smoke and I was looking for the smoke to accentuate the loaf in a subtle manner.

        • josht138
          josht138 commented
          Editing a comment
          I did a lot of wood. I only had apple wood chunks since I just ran out of the hickory, so I put in 2 large chunks when I put the loaf on and then I put 2 more on about 30 mins later.

          I thought it was a good amount of smoke flavor.

        #7
        Very nice indeed! I always glaze/sauce so the additional time doesn't exceed my target internal temp.

        Comment


          #8
          The last time I did a loaf it stalled at 150 or so and I was cooking at about 330 fahrenheit. The cook lasted well over 2 hours. I eventually pulled the loaf (I was pushing 9 PM and the family was HUNGRY for dinner) at 152 and was gratified to find that it was thoroughly cooked.

          Comment


          • josht138
            josht138 commented
            Editing a comment
            I don't think I've ever had issues with stalling at higher cooking temps over 300F. Did you try spot checking it once it stalled?

          • JeffJ
            JeffJ commented
            Editing a comment
            Yep. My instant read matched what my probe thermometer was telling me. I guess sitting just over 150 for an hour was enough to cook it through.

          #9
          I've made dozens of bacon-covered meatloaves (a family favorite) and have yet to have a meatloaf stall. However, I make each one of them uniformly in 2.5 lb (or slightly more) loaf sizes, and flatten them (wider than they are tall) so there is more surface area for the smoke to get to. I mold them in small 2.2liter Rubbermaid containers lined with plastic wrap and store them in the refrigerator until ready to smoke. Then I put them on the grate and place them in the PBC at about 330-350 deg F. I take them to 160 degF internal, which usually is in about 1.5 hours. Since they're bacon-covered, they don't need a glaze. I place them under a broiler for 2 minutes just before serving to crisp up the bacon.
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          Kathryn




          Comment


          • fzxdoc
            fzxdoc commented
            Editing a comment
            Nope, Dr ROK. Just old fashioned elbow grease.

            K.

          • Munch
            Munch commented
            Editing a comment
            Absolutely beautiful... Now I need to hit a Crate and Barrel or Macy's to pick up a few single plates. My Corelle stuff is looking sad compared to this one. The food art here is as forcing me to learn yet an additional skillset.

          • fzxdoc
            fzxdoc commented
            Editing a comment
            Munch , I have Corelle plates too because they're great for microwaving leftovers. But my turquoise/black plates are my favs because they match the decor of my Art Deco home.

            Kathryn

          #10
          Wow... that made my mouth water, Kathryn!

          Comment


          • fzxdoc
            fzxdoc commented
            Editing a comment
            Thanks, Steve!

            Kathryn

          #11
          fzxdoc What's your recipe for that loaf? Looks colorful and delicious!

          Comment


          #12
          That looks great, Kathryn. I like the idea of molding them in a loaf shaped pan and then placing directly on the grate. I have been molding them by hand and placing them directly on the grate. Worked pretty well but the meat needs to be very cold when doing it that way.

          Comment


            #13
            I agree, JeffJ , that the meat needs to be really cold before un-molding and placing on the grill. That way not only is it easier to unmold, it sucks up more smoke flavor, being so cold.

            If I'm pressed for time, I put the mold pans in the freezer for 30 min before unmolding. Easier for me, though, is to mix the meatloaf and put it into the plastic-wrapped Rubbermaid loaf pans and let it sit in the refrigerator from 4 to 24 hours before draping on the center-cut thin-sliced bacon and tossing into the smoker.

            Kathryn

            Comment


            • JeffJ
              JeffJ commented
              Editing a comment
              Yep, that sounds about right fzxdoc.

              I really like the idea of wrapping them in bacon. I have never seen that and it sounds fantastic.

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