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Summer Sausage Recipe

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    Summer Sausage Recipe

    G,day All,

    My granddad made a great summer sausage from ground beef. He didn't use a casing. He just formed it into a tube and baked. He may have wrapped it in cheesecloth. I recall the recipe having liquid smoke. I will forego the liquid smoke and just smoke it. I think there may have been some curing "salt" used too. I have Prague Powder #1. There may have been a wee bit of sugar in it too.

    Problem is, I can't get the recipe. Mom can't find it.

    Can somebody please hook me up with a recipe?

    Thanks.

    -Bill
    Last edited by CosmicMiami; December 16, 2021, 01:00 PM.

    #2
    Here's a couple:

    https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/75...ummer-sausage/

    https://pitchforkfoodie.com/beef-summer-sausage/#recipe

    If you search "summer sausage no casing recipe" you'll get a lot of results

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Murdy View Post
      Here's a couple:

      https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/75...ummer-sausage/

      https://pitchforkfoodie.com/beef-summer-sausage/#recipe

      If you search "summer sausage no casing recipe" you'll get a lot of results
      Thanks. I'll try try a blend of one of these.

      I have Prague Powder #1. Tender Quick is not available. I'm pretty sure I can sub the Prague for TQ but don't know the proper ratios.

      Comment


      • Donw
        Donw commented
        Editing a comment
        A general rule for #1 or #2 is 1 level teaspoon per 5 lbs ground. TenderQuick also has sugar added and you generally use 1 level tablespoon for 1 pound of meat.

      #4
      Backroadmeats

      Comment


      • Backroadmeats
        Backroadmeats commented
        Editing a comment
        I cheat and just buy most of my seasonings. I use a summer sausage seasoning from p&s seasonings.

      #5
      Take a look at this recipe https://www.meatsandsausages.com/sau...summer-sausage

      Comment


        #6
        This is from Ruhlman's "Charcuterie" book which is excellent and something everyone who wants to make, er, charcuterie should have:

        “This is a fermented-style sausage, one of the most popular and delicious types of sausage. A fermented sausage is one in which an active bacterial culture feeds on the sugars in the meat mixture, releasing acid, which in turn inhibits the growth of harmful bacteria and creates a pleasingly acidic taste, as with Italian soppressata. It was originally called summer sausage because it kept well in summer’s heat without refrigeration. Fermento, a dairy-based flavoring used here, gives the sausage the same tangy flavor, distinct from other acids such as citric acid or a vinegar, but it does not actually ferment. The sausage is ground once and refrigerated to allow it to cure before it is ground a second time; this will result in a firmer-textured sausage and a brighter color. This is excellent sliced thin, served at room temperature with some good mustard. Brian often bakes this sausage inside brioche.”
        • 3 pounds/1350 grams boneless lean beef (stew beef, chuck roast, round), fat and sinew removed
        • 11⁄2 pounds/675 grams boneless pork shoulder butt, diced
        • 3 tablespoons/40 grams kosher salt
        • 3 tablespoons/30 grams dextrose
        • 1 teaspoon/7 grams pink salt
        • 1⁄2 cup/80 grams Fermento (https://www.sausagemaker.com/ferment...-p/11-1022.htm)
        • 4 teaspoons/16 grams Colman’s dry mustard
        • 11⁄2 teaspoons/4 grams ground coriander
        • 1 teaspoon/2 grams garlic powder
        • 8 ounces/225 grams pork back fat, diced
        • 10 feet/3 meters hog casings, soaked in tepid water for at least 30 minutes and rinsed.

        “1. Combine the beef, pork, salt, dextrose, and pink salt and toss to mix well.
        2. Grind the mixture through the large die into a bowl set in ice (see Note below).
        3. In a small bowl, dissolve the Fermento in just enough water (1⁄4 to 1⁄2 cup/60 to 125 milliliters) to make a thin paste. Add the mustard, coriander, and garlic powder and stir to mix thoroughly. Add to the ground meat mixture and mix with the paddle attachment (or a sturdy spoon) for 2 minutes. Fold in the diced fat.
        4. Pack the mixture into a pan or plastic container, pressing out any air pockets. Cover with plastic wrap, pressing down on it so that it touches the meat (no air should touch the meat). Refrigerate for 2 days.
        5. Regrind the mixture through the small die. Sauté a bite-sized portion of the sausage, taste, and adjust the seasoning if necessary.
        6. Stuff the sausage into the hog casings, and twist into 6-inch/15-centimeter links. Hang on smoke sticks and let dry for 1 to 2 hours at room temperature or in the refrigerator.
        7. Cold-smoke the sausages (see page 77) for “ 2 hours at the lowest possible temperature (to increase its time in the smoke). Turn the heat up to 180 degrees F./82 degrees C. and smoke to an internal temperature of 150 degrees F./65 degrees C. It will have an even brown color and be firm.
        8. Remove the sausages from the smoker and hang at room temperature for 2 hours to “bloom” turning the color to a deep mahogany. Refrigerate.

        Yield: About 5 pounds/2.25 kilograms sausage; about twenty 6-inch/15-centimeter links”

        Excerpt From: Michael Ruhlman. “Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing (Revised and Updated).” Apple Books. ”
        Last edited by rickgregory; December 16, 2021, 04:12 PM.

        Comment


        • rickgregory
          rickgregory commented
          Editing a comment
          Although he calls for casing, I don't see why you couldn't make this into logs, wrap tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate it to let it firm up, then remove the plastic wrap and smoke. Also, he calls for cold smoking but I'd just smoke as close to 200 as you can get since most of us don't have good, stable cold smoking setups.

        #7
        Last Christmas I gave my Son/Grandsons a meat grinder along with recipes for some of our favorite sausages that they could make with the equipment that they had. One was summer sausage:

        Click image for larger version

Name:	Summer.JPG
Views:	66
Size:	86.8 KB
ID:	1143397
        Last edited by johnec00; December 17, 2021, 09:05 AM. Reason: Tried re-posting picture.

        Comment


        • raywjohnson
          raywjohnson commented
          Editing a comment
          You pasted the image directly into the post? That does not work for some reason. It is one of the items on my todo list to fix. You need to attach the image to the post. Using the Upload Pix button.

        • johnec00
          johnec00 commented
          Editing a comment
          raywjohnson Deleted and added picture again. Used the upload picture button the first time though. Let me know if you can see it this time, if not I will delete the post and move on.

        • rickgregory
          rickgregory commented
          Editing a comment
          johnec00 - now it's there! I remember this happening a few weeks ago to some folks. It's a weird bug. Thanks!

        #8
        Originally posted by rickgregory View Post
        This is from Ruhlman's "Charcuterie" book which is excellent and something everyone who wants to make, er, charcuterie should have:

        “This is a fermented-style sausage, one of the most popular and delicious types of sausage. A fermented sausage is one in which an active bacterial culture feeds on the sugars in the meat mixture, releasing acid, which in turn inhibits the growth of harmful bacteria and creates a pleasingly acidic taste, as with Italian soppressata. It was originally called summer sausage because it kept well in summer’s heat without refrigeration. Fermento, a dairy-based flavoring used here, gives the sausage the same tangy flavor, distinct from other acids such as citric acid or a vinegar, but it does not actually ferment. The sausage is ground once and refrigerated to allow it to cure before it is ground a second time; this will result in a firmer-textured sausage and a brighter color. This is excellent sliced thin, served at room temperature with some good mustard. Brian often bakes this sausage inside brioche.”
        • 3 pounds/1350 grams boneless lean beef (stew beef, chuck roast, round), fat and sinew removed
        • 11⁄2 pounds/675 grams boneless pork shoulder butt, diced
        • 3 tablespoons/40 grams kosher salt
        • 3 tablespoons/30 grams dextrose
        • 1 teaspoon/7 grams pink salt
        • 1⁄2 cup/80 grams Fermento (https://www.sausagemaker.com/ferment...-p/11-1022.htm)
        • 4 teaspoons/16 grams Colman’s dry mustard
        • 11⁄2 teaspoons/4 grams ground coriander
        • 1 teaspoon/2 grams garlic powder
        • 8 ounces/225 grams pork back fat, diced
        • 10 feet/3 meters hog casings, soaked in tepid water for at least 30 minutes and rinsed.

        “1. Combine the beef, pork, salt, dextrose, and pink salt and toss to mix well.
        2. Grind the mixture through the large die into a bowl set in ice (see Note below).
        3. In a small bowl, dissolve the Fermento in just enough water (1⁄4 to 1⁄2 cup/60 to 125 milliliters) to make a thin paste. Add the mustard, coriander, and garlic powder and stir to mix thoroughly. Add to the ground meat mixture and mix with the paddle attachment (or a sturdy spoon) for 2 minutes. Fold in the diced fat.
        4. Pack the mixture into a pan or plastic container, pressing out any air pockets. Cover with plastic wrap, pressing down on it so that it touches the meat (no air should touch the meat). Refrigerate for 2 days.
        5. Regrind the mixture through the small die. Sauté a bite-sized portion of the sausage, taste, and adjust the seasoning if necessary.
        6. Stuff the sausage into the hog casings, and twist into 6-inch/15-centimeter links. Hang on smoke sticks and let dry for 1 to 2 hours at room temperature or in the refrigerator.
        7. Cold-smoke the sausages (see page 77) for “ 2 hours at the lowest possible temperature (to increase its time in the smoke). Turn the heat up to 180 degrees F./82 degrees C. and smoke to an internal temperature of 150 degrees F./65 degrees C. It will have an even brown color and be firm.
        8. Remove the sausages from the smoker and hang at room temperature for 2 hours to “bloom” turning the color to a deep mahogany. Refrigerate.

        Yield: About 5 pounds/2.25 kilograms sausage; about twenty 6-inch/15-centimeter links”

        Excerpt From: Michael Ruhlman. “Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing (Revised and Updated).” Apple Books. ”
        Gotta try this one. Sounds great. Not sure I have ever had fermented sausage.

        Comment


          #9
          4 pounds of ground beef and wrapped for curing in the fridge. This is just two of the four loafs. All wrapped in cheesecloth for the fridge. I'll remove the cloth and smoke tomorrow. Will put them on one of those fancy mats for smoking.

          I'm thinking smoking until internal temp reaches around 150. Should I go lower or higher?

          Here's the recipe I used. It is an amalgamation of several I referenced. I used cheesecloth because I thought I would smoke with the cloth on but realized I had one of those fine mats so I'll take it off and drop on the mat in the smoker. Recipe called for coriander. I didn't have any so used cardamom.

          Cosmic Summer Sausage
          Ingredients
          4 pounds ground beef
          4 tablespoons mustard seed
          2 tablespoon garlic powder
          1 tablespoon onion powder
          2 tablespoons liquid smoke flavoring
          1 teaspoon Prague Powder #1
          1 tablespoon sugar
          1 tablespoon coarse ground black pepper
          2 teaspoons ground cardamom
          2 teaspoons allspice
          Directions
          In a large bowl, using your hands, mix together all ingredients. Mix well.
          Form into equal logs. Wrap with cheesecloth or plastic wrap. Chill in fridge for 24 hours.
          Fire up smoker to 250 F or thereabouts. Cook until done. Chill before slicing.
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