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Wet Brining Loin Back Ribs??

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    Wet Brining Loin Back Ribs??

    I just made a couple racks of loin back ribs on my PBC the other day. Temp ran a little hot (probably averaged 275-300) and I pulled them in 2.5 hours. They looked fine until you cut them...and I had near jerky on the thinner ends and the rest was ok...moist-ish. The meat was pull away, not fall off the bone.

    I just used salt/pepper/garlic powder as my rub, applying the salt about 4 hours before to dry brine. I did spritz a few times with apple cider vinegar to try and help with the moisture.

    I’m assuming I just overcooked them, drying out the more lean loin meat, but was curious if anyone has ever wet brined the loin back ribs and or if it might make any different in moisture retention? I’m guessing not...just was a little disappointed/embarrassed with my results...

    #2
    Those temps are pretty much normal. I usually need 3 or so hours to finish St Louie and BB ribs. Did you have pull back from the ends of the bone? Did you probe between the bones, looking for melted butter tender?
    Sure the bottom ones will get a little over done but I have to beat my son to get them.

    How many cooks have you done on your PBC. They will leak and run hot until you build up a nice layer of insulation.

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      #3
      I've never wet brined ribs. But if you do it, I'd love to see the results.


      If i do BBs I try to buy smaller racks - near the 2.5 lb mark. They have less of the loin meat to dry out. When I've done the 3.5 lb racks, they have come out dryer.
      ​​​​​
      ​​​

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        #4
        Wet brining has it's advantages with quick cook foods like pork chops and chicken breasts. As cook time gets longer it gives more time for more moisture to "leach" out. Doubt you would see much of a difference with wet brining.

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          #5
          I usually cook ribs on the PBC for 2:45 to 3 hours, have never had them overcooked like that. Did you have really small racks?
          Maybe you could hook them a bone or two lower so they ride higher. Wet brining is not the answer.

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            #6
            People here have reported the barrel temps can vary depending on where you put the probes, so it's possible you were running hotter than you thought. If the vent on the bottom is set correctly you may not have had a tight fit on the lid. A brick wrapped in an old sock placed on the lid or the addition of a LavaLock seal will fix this. Usually, after time, the PBC will develop "gunk" that will make a tight seal.

            The PBC is a moist environment, so spritzing ribs is not needed. I've never wet brined ribs, and I've found that about an hour of dry brining is fine, even for BB's that have extra loin meat.

            The bottom ribs that get crunchy are a treat for the cook . But if you'd rather not have that just cut your slabs in half before hanging.

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              #7
              Sorry for the delay in responding. Life’s a bit hectic right now.

              I’ve had this PBC for about a year. Has one previously a couple years ago but gave it to my brother in law. Feel like I’ve done enough cooks to have it seasoned. Temps are pretty stable. Started around 325-ish, settled in around 275 until I removed the lid
              to spritz.

              The racks were probably around 3.5 lbs each, hooked them 3 bones down. It was actually the tops (the wider, but thinner ribs) that got way overdone. The ones closer to the fire and the middle ones were decent.

              I figured wet brining was not the solution, but worth asking. I wonder if my probe is off and I was running hotter than I thought? (I used a Chef Alarm to monitor temps). Will test the probe before the next cook...

              Comment


                #8
                Depends where the probe is placed, budbrew2 . I nearly screwed up a cook a while back by not noticing that the ambient probe was next to the side of the barrel, still at mid-meat level. It ran a lot cooler than the one on the opposite side of the barrel, placed correctly, about 2 inches or so from the side of the barrel. I'm used to one ambient probe running hotter than the other so didn't think to check. Well, moving that probe away from the side of the barrel made one heckuva difference.

                Kathryn

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