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Dry brining with a rub containing salt?

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    Dry brining with a rub containing salt?

    Hi all - I usually dry brine poultry and love the results. I am interested in experimenting with some store bought rubs to change things up, but most of those have salt. Would you recommend just dry brining using the rub (making peace with less precise salt measurement)?

    #2
    Sure. I do it all the time. I taste the rub to see how salty it is and then eyeball the amount I use.

    Comment


    • Jim White
      Jim White commented
      Editing a comment
      Same. Although I don't even always tast.

    #3
    Ditto! Check out how salty. The rub won’t hurt anything.

    Comment


    • Steve R.
      Steve R. commented
      Editing a comment
      Do you measure out how much you use, or just eyeball it? See what I did there?

    #4
    dry brining is salt but table salt is saltier than Kosher salt (I think) so would be wise to check saltiness of the rub, maybe pour it on an open wound and if you don’t tear up, its ok?
    Last edited by smokenoob; April 8, 2020, 03:30 PM.

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    • FireMan
      FireMan commented
      Editing a comment
      Yeah, & I’d ya don’t have an open wound, well, go get one. Just make sure ya have a clean, sharp knife, yup. 🕶

    • Dewesq55
      Dewesq55 commented
      Editing a comment
      Salt is salt. Kosher salt is exactly as salty as an equal WEIGHT of table salt. If you measure by volume, then table salt will be saltier than and equal volume of kosher salt, and Diamond Crystal kosher salt will be saltier than an equal volume of Morton's kosher salt since the crystals are smaller so more time in the same volume.

    • smokenoob
      smokenoob commented
      Editing a comment
      well no wonder my chemistry professor thought I was a dunce.....fortunately I was smarter than my math professor....or at least he thought so
      thanks for reminding me!

    #5
    Tasting & trying works for many folks. If you wanna be more precise, you can compare the sodium content of your rub to a salt you may use regularly. For instance:

    Table salt has about 2300 mg of sodium per teaspoon.
    Diamond Crystal kosher salt has about 1120mg/tsp
    Morton kosher salt has about 1920 mg/tsp

    Meathead's recommendation for dry brining is 1/2 tsp kosher salt (likely diamond Crystal) per pound of meat, or 1/4 tsp of table salt per pound. That's roughly 560 mg of sodium per pound of meat.

    So you could try applying your rub up to that amount & see if you like it.

    Comment


    • Troutman
      Troutman commented
      Editing a comment
      MH recommends Morton I believe.

    • DurhamBuckeye
      DurhamBuckeye commented
      Editing a comment
      I stand corrected. I assumed Diamond Crystal because it has about half the sodium of table salt & he recommends you use twice as much kosher salt as table salt. Maybe that explains why I tend to prefer using a little more than he recommends.

    #6
    To be honest I've been dry brining for the better part of three years and love the effect it has on meat of all kinds. That said I also use both homemade and commercial rubs. I have yet, using either, to have had any complaints about the meat ever being too salty. Some commercial rubs get a little carried away, but there are also some that encourage the use of dry brining with their rubs. I think it comes down to the tolerance of the user, about all you can really do is experiment. Maybe start with a quarter teaspoon of Morton per pound, then season and taste the results.

    Again I've never had any issues personally, but I've often been called a salty dog so there's that.

    Comment


      #7
      Another check in the "yes" column. It may take a time or three to know which storebought rubs contain enough salt to fully dry brine w/ them, and which are lower and still might need a little extra salt, but that's the fun in all of this.

      Comment


      • klflowers
        klflowers commented
        Editing a comment
        Jerod Broussard it is an impressive pic. Huskee, this makes me prouder to be a part of AR with such distinguished peeps in charge lol.

      • Huskee
        Huskee commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks klflowers. I thought maybe it was time to show that I can clean up, sorta. Distinguished? YOU TAKE THAT BACK!

      • klflowers
        klflowers commented
        Editing a comment
        OK, maybe I was only referring to the other peeps in the pic when I used that word.

      #8
      I’ll second/third/fourth this - I use commercial rubs with salt and often use them for the dry brine, or dry brine with kosher salt, and use the rub right before going onto the grill. Never had complaints about stuff being over salty.

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