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Blacktip Shark Steak Recipe

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    Blacktip Shark Steak Recipe

    [EDIT] For the benefit of anyone else looking to cook these, I'll summarize what I did, based on the great advice I got below. Thanks everyone!

    Prep.
    Fire up the grill. I used half of a large Weber chimney of charcoals in the SnS with reservoir removed. I'm sure any method of two zone fire at medium-high direct heat on one side would be comparable. Since most of this cook was done with lid open, I wasn't terribly worried about the temp on the indirect side.

    Unwrap shark steaks and dry them with a paper towel. I did not dry brine, but next time I think I will try that.

    Cook.
    Front-seared the shark, assuming that they would hit "done" with this alone. As it turns out, this was not the case, and I had to leave them in the indirect zone, lid down for a bit, before coming up to 135 or so. Max warned me not to let them get past 140, and he was right. Owing to uneven shapes of these steaks, the thin bits got tough and rubbery. Next time, I may sous-vide them at 131, and then give them an ice bath before direct grilling.

    Sauce.
    Henrik gave me the brilliant suggestion of serving this with a Hollandaise. I would never have thought of that on my own, and he was spot on! It was my first time making a Hollandaise, and I was a bit intimidated by what I'd heard of it, but went with this recipe for a foolproof 2-minute Hollandaise by Kenji Lopez-Alt, and it was both easy and delicious. I made this after grilling the shark, and in the time it took, the shark did not get cold. The fresh Hollandaise was also hot.


    Result: Owing to the odd shapes of the "steaks," I overshot my temperature on parts of some, but the food was still really good! Next time, I'll try to either find more uniform cuts, sous-vide, or reverse-sear before grilling.

    Thank you, everyone who helped out!
    Last edited by MadUncleAndy; December 19, 2020, 08:09 AM.

    #2
    They're made for direct grilling. Just like swordfish or tuna. But they have more flavor (which is a good thing). Grill over direct heat and flip often. Once they get that nice surface/crust and the inner temp hits 60 deg C / 140 deg F they're done. You can test them by prodding with a fork to see that they flake easily. Depending on personal preferences you can let it go to 145 deg F also, but just like a flank steak you don't want to overshoot on temp.

    It's quite lean meat, so serve with a rich sauce. I would add salt and lemon pepper to the steaks, and serve with a Hollandaise sauce or another sauce with lots of flavor.

    Comment


    • MTurney
      MTurney commented
      Editing a comment
      Man you know your seafood 👏

    • Backroadmeats
      Backroadmeats commented
      Editing a comment
      Ya had me at hollandaise sauce!! You could put that on a boot and I would eat it!!

    #3
    A friend had our blacktip meat professionally slow smoked (possibly even first brined or cured) and packaged, as bite sized cubes of nearly transparent pink colored goodness.

    Comment


      #4
      Thanks Henrik! Direct grilled with Hollandaise sounds like a plan!

      Do I need to take any special precautions to keep them from sticking to the grates? (I'll be using an SnS or Weber Kettle, depending on what else is being cooked, if that matters) Also, any value in brining (dry or otherwise), and / or using some Marietta's Fish Rub on it? I don't plan to cook them until tomorrow, so I have some time.

      Best,
      Andy

      Comment


      • Mr. Bones
        Mr. Bones commented
        Editing a comment
        I usually lay em on a piece of foil, dab of butter kinda thing...

        Far from an expert, but it works fer me.

      • Henrik
        Henrik commented
        Editing a comment
        Nah, brush them with some oil and flip often, and you’re good. I use a spatula for the indoor frying pan, that way it is real easy to scoop them up, way better than tongs.

      • Henrik
        Henrik commented
        Editing a comment
        You can use Mr Bones’ trick by placing them on a piece of alu foil for the first few minutes until they firm up a bit, then move over to the grates right over the fire.

      #5
      Originally posted by ddmcwhirter View Post
      A friend had our blacktip meat professionally slow smoked (possibly even first brined or cured) and packaged, as bite sized cubes of nearly transparent pink colored goodness.
      Dang, that sounds yummy! The only fish I've ever smoked was Meathead's Schmancy Hot Smoked Salmon, which is now a favorite in my family.

      Comment


        #6
        Don't overcook them or they will turn to rubber!

        Comment


        • tbob4
          tbob4 commented
          Editing a comment
          I’ve made that mistake with Tuna on more than a couple of occasions. Great advice.

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