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Kosher vs. Sea

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    Kosher vs. Sea

    Salt....which do you use the most and why?

    #2
    I dry brine with kosker or coarse grain but use a locally-available Mexican sea salt for rubs since it is more consistent with the granule size of the other spices so it will fit through the shaker at the same rate. the coarse salt sometimes gets caught in the shaker if it has smallish holes and the rub doesn't spread evenly. no really big preference other than that. salt provides salt in my experience, however it may come.

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      #3
      Here’s what I’ve learned works well for us. If I’m curing or brining we use kosher, if we’re cooking (mixed into the food while preparing) it’s either pink or table salt and we use sea salt post cook as a finishing salt because to me it’s much milder so you don’t tend to over do it.

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        #4
        I use Himalayan pink salt as others use table salt.

        I use kosher salt for dry brining, for consistency.

        I use large flake sea salt for finishing salt on some dishes.

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          #5
          Sea salt is our go to but pink salt is beginning to over take and pull ahead.
          Haven't brought kosher salt in ages as again pink is taking over.
          We haven't had iodized table salt around in decades.
          Why....like most I read reviews....

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            #6
            I use coarse kosher salt for dry brining and in BBQ recipes. Also keep fine sea salt in the pantry. The wife is convinced that Himalayan pink salt is the best thing for you and somehow better than sea salt or normal table salt, so uses that as table salt. I try and tell her it is just salt with rust (iron oxide) impurities present. She for whatever reason does not believe me, but if you google it you will see I am right.

            We have salt shakers that I secretly fill with Morton iodized table salt. SWMBO thinks they are filled with sea salt, but I am sorta convinced that we need a little old fashioned table salt in the mix, as all the fancy salt has gotten us away from iodine in our diets, and I have a few family members with thyroid problems, so I'm not taking any chances.

            I keep pool salt and ice cream rock salt on hand as well at all times, but those aren't for cooking.

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            • Dadof3Illinois
              Dadof3Illinois commented
              Editing a comment
              Yep forgot about the big box of rock salt for making ice cream…..oh and melting ice in the winter.

            • Histrix
              Histrix commented
              Editing a comment
              Most sea salts contain microplastics these days.
              The only salt which will be guaranteed to NOT contain any microplastics is Himalayan salt due to obvious reasons.

            • jfmorris
              jfmorris commented
              Editing a comment
              Good info to know Histrix - I guess another reason to get salt that is mined versus sea salt. A little bit of research seems to indicate that most course Kosher salt originates from mines rather than evaporation of sea water, so I guess that's a good thing.

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