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Roasted chicken almost always = soup on deck

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    Roasted chicken almost always = soup on deck

    When I roast a chicken them bones go into the instant pot overnight.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	D5ajdsacozbHpWKFpbIjGevwDFiumyaw7YV9rj9Hly5p4j1r1-7ikMAmwXnnaldzJ_sFM8CV1X9WotmFNVnpXMpDb9eO-qLKlSepWAEhi4Im_hgueAgc9hxUqykCkIpiNyawiL_GkfH1PSvrwSOoQsklzv84kaZBELilZHqUmVJmxeUsHPwQ0a1jvVqgP1Z7hVsIjs2wXIdIx6uhUMOKcdT7yZAu8BLpGTSA5jfLFAF8HZLLRotFDYgBHcpyPCE Views:	3 Size:	562.5 KB ID:	825008

    In the morning I have 3 quarts of broth.

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    Tonight I'll have soup...
    Last edited by Attjack; April 3, 2020, 10:55 AM.

    #2
    Nice. Have not made the IP purchase yet, but that moves me one step closer.

    Comment


    • Attjack
      Attjack commented
      Editing a comment
      It's almost worth it just for making broth. I used to stay up late after dinner to get it all processed. Now it's in the pot and off to bed and 10 minutes in the morning will get it in jars.

    • DreamOn
      DreamOn commented
      Editing a comment
      A crock pot also works fine 👍🏻

    #3
    Liquid Gold, looks delicious!!!
    Nice job, Brother!

    Comment


    • Oak Smoke
      Oak Smoke commented
      Editing a comment
      Yes sir! Liquid gold! I freeze mine in ice trays, remember those, then transfer them to a ziplock bag for storage. They can take so many things to the next level.

    • Attjack
      Attjack commented
      Editing a comment
      Oak Smoke Another good technique is to put it in freezer bags and into the freezer on a sheet pan. Once they are frozen they are nice and flat so it makes it easier to store in the freezer.

    • Dewesq55
      Dewesq55 commented
      Editing a comment
      Attjack - that's what I do. I learned it from Serious Eats. I know that fzxdoc does it as well. I have a gallon of it in the fridge that I made 2 days ago in my 10qt IP 2 says ago. Bagging that much up is a PITA.

    #4
    Attjack - that looks awesome, is there a particular recipe you use?

    Comment


    • Attjack
      Attjack commented
      Editing a comment
      No, not unless I'm trying to do something authentic like pho. I put vegetable and animal scraps in freezer bags. So last night I had the Peruvian chicken carcass and it went into the pot along with the organs, and some wing tips I had in the freezer. I also added what was in the veggie scrap bag which was mostly carrot skins and mushroom stems. Sometimes I'll cut up onions and toss them in too. So, in this case, there will be flavoring from the Peruvian spices present in the broth.

    • Attjack
      Attjack commented
      Editing a comment
      If I was doing it without scraps and wanted vegetable flavors I would probably go with onion, carrots, and celery. But I like the idea of using the stuff that would otherwise get wasted.

    • pkadare
      pkadare commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks!

    #5
    pkadare
    Pressure Cooker Chicken Stock

    Ingredients
    []4 1/2 pounds (2kg) mixed chicken parts, such as wings, backs, bones, and feet (see note)
    []½ pound yellow onion quartered - leave the skin on
    []4 ounces carrots, cut in 3 or 4 pieces each
    []4 ounces celery, cut in 3 or 4 pieces
    []2 medium cloves garlic
    []4 flat-leaf parsley sprigs
    []3 fresh thyme sprigs (optional)
    []1 bay leaf

    Directions
    1. Rub bones with canola oil and roast at 450-500ºF for 1 hour. Half way through, turn the bones over for even browning and pour accumulated fat and juices over the mirepoix in the bowl and toss to coat
    2. Pour contents of the bowl onto another baking sheet and put into the same oven with the chicken to caramelize.
    3. Combine all ingredients in a stovetop or electric pressure cooker and cover with cold water, about 2 quarts (1.9L). Make sure not to let liquid exceed the cooker's max-fill line; it's okay if a few things poke above the water's surface.
    4. Close cooker and bring to high pressure, then cook at high pressure for 90 minutes. Allow cooker to depressurize, either by allowing it to cool to room temperature (for the clearest stock) or by using the pressure-release valve on the cooker to rapidly vent steam. (Using the release valve will cause the stock to boil, which may result in some loss of clarity; this should not be an issue unless you're serving it as consommé or in another preparation that requires the broth to be crystal-clear.)
    5. Skimfat from stock, strain, then use as desired or freeze for up to 6 months.

    This is a combination and modification of 2 stock recipes - one for stovetop and 1 for pressure cooker/IP. I do the natural release option.

    Here's the batch I just made.
    Click image for larger version

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    Last edited by Dewesq55; April 3, 2020, 01:38 PM.

    Comment


    • fzxdoc
      fzxdoc commented
      Editing a comment
      I wish I could triple "Like" this post. I use almost exactly the same recipe, except I add some dried basil and white wine. Either way, it's so good.

      Are these the proportions you use for your 10 Quart IP or your 6 Quart IP?

      Kathryn
      Last edited by fzxdoc; April 3, 2020, 01:38 PM.

    • Dewesq55
      Dewesq55 commented
      Editing a comment
      fzxdoc - This recipe is for a regular 6 qt IP. I double it for my 10qt.
      Last edited by Dewesq55; April 3, 2020, 02:04 PM.

    #6
    I really want to try this. Is 90 minutes pretty standard for how long to pressure cook chicken bones for stock? Is roasting them in the oven necessary every time or is it done to add flavor? Anyone ever try making a beef stock in the pressure cooker with beef bones or would that even work?

    Comment


    • Dewesq55
      Dewesq55 commented
      Editing a comment
      The serious eats recipe says 45 mins. I like 90 mins much better. And yes, I make IP beef stock

    • Dewesq55
      Dewesq55 commented
      Editing a comment
      You can make chicken stock without roasting the bones. I just like it better that way. I have done both.

    • Attjack
      Attjack commented
      Editing a comment
      I've done anything from 2 - 4 hours. Keep in mind if you're doing it overnight it will be steeping for over 8 hours so it almost doesn't matter how long you go.

      Roasting bones is traditional and requires extra effort. But I usually prefer to make chicken for dinner and go from there.

      Yes. Beef stock. Pork. Fish. Don't waste them bones!

    #7
    bep35 - here is the Serious Eats IP beef stock recipe. I follow this one the way out is and it comes out great.

    Ingredients
    []5 pounds (2.25kg) beef bones (see note)
    []Vegetable oil, for drizzling
    []1 (8-ounce; 225g) yellow onion, roughly diced
    []1 medium (4-ounce; 115g) carrot, roughly diced
    []1 large (3-ounce; 85g) celery rib, roughly diced
    []Boiling water, for deglazing
    []2 medium cloves garlic
    []2 sprigs thyme
    []1 sprig flat-leaf parsley
    []2 tablespoons tomato paste

    Directions
    1. Preheat oven to 400°F with rack set in middle position. Lightly coat all the bones with oil and arrange in an even layer on a rimmed baking sheet or in a roasting pan. Roast, turning bones once or twice, until beginning to turn golden-brown, about 30 minutes.

    2. Meanwhile, lightly toss onion, carrot, and celery in oil. When step 1 is complete, scatter all over and around bones and continue roasting until bones and vegetables are nicely browned, about 30 minutes longer. Be careful not to let anything scorch.

    3. Transfer beef bones and roasted vegetables to a pressure cooker. Pour off and discard (or save) any accumulated fat from the roasting pan. Pour a thin layer of boiling water into roasting pan and scrape up any browned bits. Pour pan juices into pressure cooker.

    4. Add garlic, thyme, parsley, and tomato paste to pressure cooker. Add enough cold water to bring level to the cooker's max-fill line; do not let water exceed the max-fill line, even if some solids are not submerged.

    5. Close pressure cooker, bring to high pressure, and cook for 2 hours 30 minutes. Allow cooker to depressurize naturally. Open cooker and strain stock through a fine-mesh strainer (discard solids, though if there's a shank in there, be sure to eat it).

    6. Skim the stock by either carefully ladling off the top layer of fat while stock is still hot, or, for greater ease, refrigerate stock until well chilled, then remove the solid cap of fat that rises to the top.

    7. Portion stock into storage containers or zipper-lock bags (if it's been chilled, reheat it to a liquid state first), then freeze or refrigerate until ready to use.

    Comment


    • pkadare
      pkadare commented
      Editing a comment
      Make sure the beef bones are cut short enough to fit into your pressure cooker (ask butcher to cut them shorter if not). You can use any assortment of bones your butcher has, but bones with bits of meat still attached will give more flavor, while connective-tissue-rich options like joints and feet will deliver more gelatin to the stock; you can also include some veal bones for even more gelatin. A cross-cut beef shank, while not required, will boost the flavor even more; eat it after cooking.

    • pkadare
      pkadare commented
      Editing a comment
      My comment are the notes from the recipe. Here's the link - https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...eef-stock.html

    • HawkerXP
      HawkerXP commented
      Editing a comment
      The good old pressure cooker. How many meals we saw come out of that pot growing up. Occasionally my Mother would send me to the hardware store, yes hardware store, to buy another seal for the lid.

    #8
    37 ½ cup portions ready for the freezer. Click image for larger version

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    Comment


    • fzxdoc
      fzxdoc commented
      Editing a comment
      Wow, that takes patience to bag up 37 portions. My hat's off to you. I usually bag a couple of 4 cup portions in gallon bags to have on hand for soup, and the rest in 1 cup portions. If I need something as small as half a cup, I whack the bag against the counter edge and pull out enough pieces to weigh in as a cup or so.

      I never thought I'd hear myself say something like this but you've got yourself an impressive collection of beef (edited to say, "er, chicken" ) broth bags there.

      Kathryn
      Last edited by fzxdoc; April 4, 2020, 05:56 PM.

    • Dewesq55
      Dewesq55 commented
      Editing a comment
      fzxdoc - It's chicken, but thanks. It was a bit tedious, but I took a couple of breaks. I find I have a lot of recipes that only call for ½ cup. Knowing me, I would end up wasting a lot of I froze it in 1 cup portions.

    #9
    Attjack so when it is finished it just switches to warm and you leave it until the morning?

    Comment


    • Dewesq55
      Dewesq55 commented
      Editing a comment
      "I know, I know; there's Tons of tutorials, entire sites out there, but I always look fer answers here, from folks I know an trust!"

      As you should, Mr. Bones . Happy to be of service.

    • Mr. Bones
      Mr. Bones commented
      Editing a comment
      Attjack Dewesq55 Many thanks, Brothers!
      Be safe an well, yall!

    • Dewesq55
      Dewesq55 commented
      Editing a comment
      You as well, Mr. Bones !

    #10
    Here's the soup (repost)

    Click image for larger version

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    Comment


      #11
      Great way to get some good quality broth Attjack

      Comment


        #12
        Broth made in the IP. Can't beat it!! Do it all the time, Although never overnight, thanks for the suggestion!!

        Comment


          #13
          Usually in the wintertime I take advantage of cold nighttime (and some daytime) temps to cool the broth on the deck. I trust temps around 32°F for this. In the Spring/Summer/Fall, the temps don't get cold enough to do this. That's when I'll try your overnight broth idea, Attjack . Thanks for posting it!

          Kathryn
          Last edited by fzxdoc; April 4, 2020, 10:01 AM.

          Comment


          • IowaGirl
            IowaGirl commented
            Editing a comment
            I love my "Kelvinator"! Only problem is sometimes raccoons visit the deck (a second story deck with no outside stairs -- they have to shinny up a support post). Other than the wildlife, it works really well.

          • fzxdoc
            fzxdoc commented
            Editing a comment
            Our wildlife is most often black bears, IowaGirl. So far they haven't demonstrated a proclivity to cooling broth. That said, they did turn over and ravage our neighbor's gas grill, attached to their propane gas feed from their home. Sort of scary. Good reason to keep outside grills and smokers prisitine.

            Kathryn

          #14
          I'm definitely doing this.

          Comment


            #15
            Yup. Chicken carcass = chicken broth 👍🏻

            Comment

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