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Turkey on the grill, didn't go so well

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  • Bkhuna
    Club Member
    • Apr 2019
    • 654
    • Merritt Island Florida

    #16
    +1 for spatchcocking a bird. It's as foolproof as it can get. I gave up doing whole birds several years ago. Even cooking and a dramatic reduction in time.

    https://www.seriouseats.com/2012/11/...tchcocked.html
    Last edited by Bkhuna; July 29, 2019, 03:35 AM.

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    • phecksel
      Club Member
      • Jun 2019
      • 20
      • South East MI

      #17
      Originally posted by Bkhuna View Post
      +1 for spatchcocking a bird. It's as foolproof as it can get. I gave up doing whole birds several years ago. Even cooking and a dramatic reduction in time.

      https://www.seriouseats.com/2012/11/...tchcocked.html
      I'm surprised at their 450F cooking temp

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      • jfmorris
        jfmorris commented
        Editing a comment
        I try to run the cooker at 350 for my poultry. I agree that 450 is kinda high. I would expect some scorched skin, but maybe not. Let's face it - other than presentation, most of the skin on a turkey doesn't get eaten by the time I carve up the breasts. The drumsticks are about the only skin that gets consumed, as the boys fight over those most years.

      • Bkhuna
        Bkhuna commented
        Editing a comment
        Here's their link for grill roasting a spatchcocked turkey.

        https://www.seriouseats.com/2014/11/...ey-recipe.html

        High heat, uniform thickness, decrease in cooking time. That's the crux of the technique.
    • jfmorris
      Club Member
      • Nov 2017
      • 3568
      • Huntsville, Alabama
      • Jim Morris

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      #18
      I don't think I will do a turkey that isn't spatchcocked or even split or deconstructed going forward. I've had great success spatchcocking birds up to 24 pounds, and love the time savings I get in the cook. I always orient so that the legs are pointed towards the heat in my offset or my kettle (smaller turkeys) so that the dark meat reaches around 185 about the time the breast hits 165. You will find that the dark meat is SAFE at 165, but it is slimy and unappealing to me, and I let it hit 175 to 185. Spatchcocking helps a lot in this regard, as it lets the legs and thighs get done better in my opinion, and they tend to reach a good done temp about the same time as the breast.

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      • Troutman
        Club Member
        • Aug 2017
        • 7833
        • 1521

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        #19
        I agree with spatchcocking almost all foul; chickens, quails, squabs, turkeys. Much better surface contact area and better flavor as a result. Having said that, I do rotisserie whole chickens on a regular basis and the way I was taught is to temp the breast meat first, it should be around 160* then temp the "arm pit" between the leg and thigh, that should b at 175*.

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        2021 Meat-Up In Memphis Canceled - Rescheduled for March 2022

        We've unfortunately had to cancel the 2021 Meat-Up in Memphis. We are rescheduling for March 18-20, 2022. More details and re-booking info coming soon! For now click here for more info.
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