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Ultimate Turkey Gravy Question

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    Ultimate Turkey Gravy Question

    What is this supposed to look like, taste like when finished? I attempted it tonight, and the pre looks just like the MHs, but the post looks and tastes...strange.
    For the most part it looks like broth that you dissolved a lot of solids in. It tastes primarily of oil, I get a hint of vegetables, onion and turkey, but the primary taste is oil.

    It may taste totally different when covering turkey, but from just a taste on the finger I don't think I would ever pour it on anything intended for consumption.

    #2
    I will forward this to Meathead & Chef Ryan. Someone else recently had this same question. They'd be the best ones to answer it.

    Comment


      #3
      it sounds from your post like your having issues with fats and oils, this should be a fairly simple fix. Ok so when making any kind of gravy or stock it is important to separate out both the solids and the fat. The first and easiest thing to do would be to pass the gravy through a strainer or colander first, this will remove all your solids and make the next step easier. There is a device called a gravy separator that is designed specifically for the task at hand but many people don't have one or are unfamiliar with it. Basically in short a gravy separator looks like a glass teapot with graduated volume marking on the side like a measuring cup. When you pour liquid in that has both fats and water(broth) the fats being less dense will float on top of the broth. The separator allows you to pour the good stuff out from under the fat and you can then discard the unappealing fat layer on top. If you don't have such a device there are two other options. The first would be to use a spoon or ladle and gently skim the layer of fat off of the surface, the fat will usually be clearer then the stock so it should be easy to differentiate between the 2. this isn't an exact method and you'll probably find it hard to get every drop of fat out this way but it works and will make a noticeable difference. The other option requires more time cause you'll need to let the liquid cool for several hours or over night so this may not be the best option for some timing wise. However if you can let it cool the fat will solidify and set at the surface making it supremely easy to simply reach in and discard the layer of solid fat. After any of these steps you will be left with just the stock which is what we're after for making the best possible gravy. Hope this helps and sorry if its a bit long winded I tried to stay as concise as possible while still conveying my point.

      Comment


      • _John_
        _John_ commented
        Editing a comment
        This was great and makes perfect sense. I used a strainer, but it had some fairly large holes, on my way to get a separator now!

        Thanks!

      • smarkley
        smarkley commented
        Editing a comment
        Thank YOU! I never heard of that separator tool... it makes perfect sense though!

        Here is one at amazon using the AR amazon link, of course --

        http://www.amazon.com/OXO-1067506-So...=fat+separator
        Last edited by smarkley; November 15, 2014, 11:12 AM.

      #4
      It is a broth with a lot of solids! Also a lot of fat and you need to remove most of it. In years of publishing this recipe I have NEVER heard a complaint about the gravy. From the recipe: "8) Carefully remove the gravy pan from the cooker. Pour the gravy through a strainer into a large pot or saucepan. Discard the solids. They have given you their all. Let it sit for about 10 minutes and with a large spoon or basting bulb, remove most of the fat. You'll never get it all, so don't obsess. Besides, fat brings flavor. Now taste the juice under the fat. It should be rich and flavorful. If you find it too weak bring it to a boil and cook it down a bit. Taste again and add salt only at the last minute. If you add salt and then reduce it, it will be too salty."

      I have the OXO smarkley recommends and that works, but there is more liquid here than fits, so I just put it in a thermos and the fat rises to to top. I then just pour it off. If you have some of the gravy still, taste it from under the fat layer. Use a straw!

      Comment


      • smarkley
        smarkley commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks Meathead.. you rawk!

      • wahuwa73
        wahuwa73 commented
        Editing a comment
        I'm the cheesecloth guy. I had the same question. Thanks for the great response to the gravy question!

      #5
      I missed the fact that it wasn't strained/separated. I thought the finished product according to the recipe was oily tasting. Glad you got your answer!

      Comment


        #6
        John, did you get a separator? Did it make a difference?

        Comment


        • _John_
          _John_ commented
          Editing a comment
          I did, seemed to work just fine, layer of fat at the surface and this lets you pour from underneath it.

        #7
        John, I had this problem on my turkey smoke with MH recipe. I stuck my finger in and it taste just like the oil I used on the turkey. I wrote it up on this site and everyone was stumped because I did everything right. I let it cool in the frig and the next day spooned the solid fat off the top. I then put it on the stove and heated it for a bit while stirring it often. I did add a little salt, pepper and garlic salt. Anyway it was fine, really good on the turkey. After you take the gravy pan off the smoker and strain the solids the other flavors sink to the bottom. That is why stirring while heating probably helped. Don't take me for an expert just telling you my story.
        Last edited by Guy; November 19, 2014, 03:02 PM.

        Comment


          #8
          Guy: Good to know!

          Comment


            #9
            How about sauteing some shallots, make a roux and add that liquid to finish your gravy?

            Comment


              #10
              It ended up working well, took it to my mothers house and got to work carving up the turkey. When I was done I turned to see the empty bowl. I asked where the gravy went and she looked down at the pot she was stirring on the stove. It wasn't near thick enough but it should be ok now, if you want, next time you make gravy call me and i'll tell you how to do it.

              Could have just bought the gravy packet at the grocery store...Hell, with the fat separator and all the ingredients that gravy cost me $30!

              Comment


              • Huskee
                Huskee commented
                Editing a comment
                OMG. I would've been more than a little upset.

              • Chef Ryan
                Chef Ryan commented
                Editing a comment
                I'm sorry to hear John I'm with Huskee I probably would've lost it at that point.

              • smarkley
                smarkley commented
                Editing a comment
                Have them compare the ingredients of the gravy packet to your gravy ingredients... that should shut 'em up... (who wants to ingest all that garbage? LOL)

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