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This is for those that also like to bake bread...

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    This is for those that also like to bake bread...

    *Ciabatta bread... Fast and easy in your Kitchen Aid mixer.*

    It should take about 4 to 5 hours from the time you start. It will be more than that if your house is cold and less if you house is hot. I've done it in 3 hours start to finish and that includes the baking time. Sometimes it's taken 5 hours.

    Recipe:
    • 500 grams of bread flour. I use King Arthur's bread flour.
    • 450 grams of water. This is a 90% hydration recipe. Very sticky!
    • 1 packet of active dry yeast... Like you buy at the grocery store. 7grams.
    • 10 grams of salt.


    Equipment preference ... Use whatever you have
    • Standup Mixer... I use a 5 quart Kitchen-Aid - mixer with the dough hook. https://www.flickr.com/photos/food_pictures/9178138985/
    • Digital scale that weighs small quantities.
    • https://www.flickr.com/photos/food_pictures/9238090449/
    • Baking stone or pizza stone...
    • Parchment paper...
    • Thermapen - instant read food thermometer.* http://www.thermoworks.com/products/thermapen/
    • Spray can of Canola oil...
    • Food scraper... I use 2 of them. A small teardrop shaped one to scrape the glop/dough out of the mixing bowl and a 6" straight edge I use to shape and cut the dough.
    • A proofing bucket... a barrel shaped plastic container. I put a rubber band at the same level as the dough is at so I can measure from the starting point and I know when it has TRIPLED in mass. http://www.flickr.com/photos/food_pictures/9193052175/
    • Pizza peel...
    • An oven... Any kind! I've baked this bread indoors in my kitchen oven and I've baked it in my Big Green Egg which is an outdoor Ceramic oven. You can bake it in any cooking device you can control the temperature in. I've found the preferred baking temp is 465 degrees. Baking time... About 15/16 minutes. It MIGHT take a little longer but when it is at 205 degrees, internal crumb temp, it is done. If you are a few degrees over or under - No big deal.

    Outdoor baking...
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/food_pictures/9178041081/

    Method...

    1) weigh out 450 grams of water...

    2) proof your dry active yeast... 1 package active dry yeast = about 2 1/4 teaspoons = 1/4 ounce = 7 grams. Pour enough water from your 450 grams, about 30 grams, into a very small bowl and microwave it for a few seconds until it is between 95 and 110 degrees. Put a packet of yeast in the warm water and proof it. It's a shame to spend all of this time to mix a dough and find out later your yeast was dead on arrival.

    3) determine the temperature of the room you will be cooking in. Not required but handy. You will see why below.

    4) determine the temperature of your flour in the bag or canister it is stored in.* Not required but handy. You will see why below.

    5) water temperature... The temp of the water you use is the ONLY control you have over the final outcome after the mixing process. Your dough will rise faster and better if it is close to 80 degrees.**See below how to determine the correct water temp... It's easy.

    6) weigh out 500 grams of bread flour. I do that with the bowl of my kitchen-aid mixer on my digital scale. Fewer dirty dishes is a good thing.

    7) once you have determined your yeast is active... Pour it and all of the water you used to proof it into your bowl on top of the flour. You want to use all 450 grams of water.

    8) pour in the remaining 420 grams of water...

    9) notice... We have not added the salt yet. Salt can kill the yeast when added at the wrong time.

    10) turn the mixer on at a slow speed and mix it to just a shaggy state... Just until the majority of the flour has been absorbed by the water. I don't want to over mix the dough at this point. Once the vast majority of the flour has been absorbed by the water I shut down the mixer and take the bowl off and scrape the edges and the bottom with my scraper to get all of the flour wet.

    11) I let the dough rest for 20 minutes... I let the flour, water and yeast work it's magic to comingle and start building the glutton strands. At this point the dough is like a heavy waffle dough consistency ... Not bread dough yet.

    12) after the rest I add the salt by sprinkling it all around the top of the dough so it will mix in evenly when you start the high speed mixing process.

    13) turn your mixer on to a high speed... I use #8 on my KA mixer which is the second highest speed. The waffle like dough will just mix around for a while -then... It will slowly start sticking to the dough hook and start slapping the side of the mixing bowl. Then as it starts to tighten up and build the glutton strands, the ball building around the dough hook, will start peeling away the sticky dough stuck to the side of the bowl. Then when the side of the bowl is clean it will start picking up the dough from the bottom of the bowl. Once there is NO soft gooey dough left at the bottom of your mixing bowl... It is a done deal! Depending on the heat in your kitchen this process can take 15 minutes and up to 30 minutes. It WILL NOT hurt your Kitchen Aid mixer. You will need to stay close to your mixer it will walk on your counter top some.

    14) spray/rub your proofing barrel/bowl with an oil... I use a spray can of canola oil.

    15) scrape the dough out of the mixing bowl into the proofing container. It's a very wet dough! Mark the proofing container where your dough is at this point because you want it to rise to 3 times the size it it now. I like to use a barrel shaped container so I can put a rubber band around it and measure the increase during the rise. Remember to place a towel or shower cap over the proofing container.* https://www.flickr.com/photos/food_pictures/9193052175/

    16) if your dough came out of the mixer at about 80 degrees and your room temperature is 70ish degrees it will take about 2 hours to rise... Give or take.*

    17) once your dough has TRIPLED... This is a good time to preheat your oven and baking stone/pizza stone to 465 degrees. 1 hour before baking is best.

    18) Scrape your glop, dough out onto a smooth well floured work surface and then sprinkle it with flour. Get lots of flour on your hands because this is a very sticky dough. Use your hands and your 6" scraper to work the dough into a manageable mass. Cut the dough in half don't worry about pre shaping it much. I just work it in to an ball without deflating it much. Sprinkle it with flour and put a damp towel over it and let it rest for 30 minutes right where it is. You can cut this dough into smaller sizes too. It works well for hoagie rolls, dinner rolls *or pizza bough https://www.flickr.com/photos/food_pictures/9195867172/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/food_pictures/9195884898/

    19) tear a piece of parchment paper twice the width *of your loaf and put it on top of your pizza peel... The bottom of a cookie sheet will work too if you don't have a peel. You need a way to get this wet dough into the oven.*

    20) reshape your loaf to the final shape you want it to be. It does not need to be a perfect shape, I usually shape it into a batard shape... Like a long fat sourdough loaf. You don't want to deflate it during this process. Transfer it on to the parchment paper and put it on the peel, flour the surface and cover it again with the damp towel and let it rise again*for 30 minutes.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/food_pictures/9196044808/

    Here's a video of a professional baker cutting and shaping his ciabatta dough.

    21) right before I put the dough into the oven I spray the loaf with a light coating of canola oil to help the browning process. use the parchment paper to transfer the loaf from the peel/cookie sheet to the baking stone/ pizza stone. Close the oven door.

    22) let the loafs bake at 465 degrees for 8 minutes then open the oven door and use the parchment paper to spin it 180 degrees so you get even cooking/browning. You will be amazed at the oven spring this bread gets in those 8 minutes.

    23) 15/16 minutes at 465 degrees and your loaf should be browned and at about 200 to 205 degrees Internal temp - it's done! If you have a thermapen you can test that accurately like I do.

    24) take your loaf out of the oven and put it on an elevated grate so it can cool evenly. Let it cool for at least 30 minutes before slicing.
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/food_pictures/9193566707/

    25) slice and enjoy...
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/food_pictures/9194092197/ https://www.flickr.com/x/t/0098009/p...s/16127976148/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/food_pictures/9194351017/

    * Using WATER to control the temperature of the dough during the mixing process.*

    Water temperature chart by General Mills... http://www.generalmillsfoodservice.c...ure-chart.ashx

    Your Kitchen Aid mixer for this recipe will add 10 to 12 degrees of heat to the dough from the friction of the high speed mixing process. I know that from the experience of making this recipe about 50 times.

    I stumbled on to this chart looking for a good pizza dough recipe. General Mills encourages their customers to get their yeast bread doughs to 80 degrees to decrease the amount of time it takes to rise. They also used this chart to get the same results from customers whether they were in Alaska, Kansas or Arizona... Year round. It's easier than it appears.

    Try it... You will like it.
    Last edited by Huskee; January 25, 2015, 02:34 AM.

    #2
    Hmmm... Sorry about the spacing and lack of paragraphs. I wrote it properly but when I posted it, it condensed everything together. Go to bread in the Home menu and read it there. I sent this recipe to Meathead on that page and it stayed properly spaced. It's easier to read there.

    Comment


    • Huskee
      Huskee commented
      Editing a comment
      Did you post it here from a phone? I've read from other members that posting from iPhones and the like seems to disregard formatting and makes run-on paragraphs.

    • smarkley
      smarkley commented
      Editing a comment
      I appreciate you doing this... I have baked a lot of bread over the years. It is a very interesting topic.

    #3
    Smarkley... I had never baked ANYTHING until I retired and my son bought me a Big Green Egg as my retirement gift. The owners Manual said... You can bake bread in it, better than in your kitchen oven. I thought I'd give it a throw. Now... I bake sourdough bread, Ciabbata bread, pizza dough or any kind of bread I want! I... Started with sourdough... Not knowing that it was the most difficult of all breads. So when I decided to try ciabatta... It was easy. I've learned bakers percentages and many other professional baking techniques... As a hobby. A man can only eat so much meat... I love to serve my friends a great steak, fettuccine alfredo, asparagus with a hollendaise sauce and bread I baked myself, sourdough or ciabatta... With a nice glass of wine. Baking bread is much more scientific than grilling a steak. Much more of a challenge.

    Comment


      #4
      Huskee... I posted it from my iPad. I posted at the bread page on the same device and it came out totally differently on this page. Not sure why?

      Comment


        #5
        Originally posted by Wartface View Post
        Huskee... I posted it from my iPad. I posted at the bread page on the same device and it came out totally differently on this page. Not sure why?
        Yeah vBulletin and Apple devices aren't the best of friends. If you can get to a computer to edit it that'd be great. If you'd like I could try to separate lines to make it an easier read....not a big deal either way.

        Comment


          #6
          Huskee... Yes. Please edit it. It you search bread on the tested recipes and then go to bread. You will see my discussion with Meathead and how it was formatted there. Thanks.

          Comment


            #7
            Originally posted by Wartface View Post
            Huskee... Yes. Please edit it. It you search bread on the tested recipes and then go to bread. You will see my discussion with Meathead and how it was formatted there. Thanks.
            Done! Your numbering is off on the Disqus page where your original post is, I corrected it here. Have a looksy and let me know if anything needs changed.

            Comment


            • Breadhead
              Breadhead commented
              Editing a comment
              Thank you Huskee... You do fine work Sir. I know more about bread and BBQ than I do computers.

            • Huskee
              Huskee commented
              Editing a comment
              Thank you sir, but I just clicked a few keys. You shared an awesome detailed recipe with our community here- YOU do fine work!

            #8
            That is quite the ciabatta recipe. It covers every ciabatta sensibility I've ever used(except sourdough). I will print and try this one, as it looks epic! I do so love to bake bread. I even mill my own flour. Yes, I'm that nuts, as if you all didn't know that by now...lol

            Great job Wartface, and thank you ever so much for sharing your cool recipe with all of us. Good job, as well, showing us the internal temp for the finished bread, as that is extremely important for good crumb.

            Comment


              #9
              Strat50... I've been trying to get Meathead to further develop his bread pages. There are lots of us that bake bread as a hobby. Have fun with this recipe. It's an easy way of doing ciabatta because the mixer does most of the work for you... No kneading or stretch and folds required. It's nice having a recipe yo start at noon and you have fresh bread to serve at dinner. My sourdough takes at least 24 hours from the time I mix the dough. I have a good sourdough recipe too if you want to give that a go. Here's a picture of the sourdough I bake on my Big Green Egg. https://www.flickr.com/photos/food_pictures/8991726160/

              Comment


              • smarkley
                smarkley commented
                Editing a comment
                Whew really nice pic Wartface... I can almost smell it.

                The only bread baking I have done outside is with a Dutch Oven... I would really like getting a setup similar to yours someday.

              #10
              Great step by step with explanations along the way! Gotta try this one.

              Comment


              • Breadhead
                Breadhead commented
                Editing a comment
                Have fun with it Dr Rok... It is my go to bread recipe these days. My friends, that are bakers, always ask for the recipe when they taste it. I slice it and have toast in the morning with my coffee whenever I have some in the house. If you try it... Send pictures.

              #11
              really cool will be trying this soon . I am guessing you can make rolls for sandwiches and burgers?

              Comment


              • Breadhead
                Breadhead commented
                Editing a comment
                Yes... Once you have the dough made you can cut it to any size you want. See the video on cutting and shaping.

                I cut it into roll sizes for hoagies. I've made dinner rolls with it and I've used it for pizza dough. You can also degas it and make focaccia bread out of it.

                You need to reduce the cooking time for smaller pieces. Use your thermapen and when they get to 200 to 205 degrees they are done.
                Last edited by Breadhead; January 25, 2015, 04:23 PM.

              • Papa Bob
                Papa Bob commented
                Editing a comment
                thanks how long did it take you to type all that cuz it took me 5 min to type this. ha-ha

              • Breadhead
                Breadhead commented
                Editing a comment
                Papa Bob... I've typed that over time. Many people that I've served that bread to have asked for the recipe. Some experienced bakers and some beginners. I just kept updating it over time to where most novices can do it fairly easily.

              #12
              For those interested in getting their bread together, I can recommend this site highly. They are into bread like we are into "Q." There are recipes, videos, and links to bake just about any bread you care to mention, along with several excellent treatises on sourdough bread. They are nice folks too. Be careful, however, or you'll start building your own oven(s)!

              Comment


              • Breadhead
                Breadhead commented
                Editing a comment
                I use that website too. My favorite bread website was Northwestsourdough.com but something happened that they just shut down. They taught me all I know about how to make sourdough bread. I was trying to learn how to make sourdough bread on King Arthur Flour website but was baking hockey pucks. One of the moderators there suggested I try Nortwest sourdough to see if they could help. There was a guy there by the name of Shasta who was a really, really good teacher.
                Last edited by Breadhead; January 26, 2015, 06:28 PM.

              #13
              Excellent. I love baking bread,

              Comment

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